Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

what is the best photo printer?

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Share
April 20, 2005 11:42:37 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I want to buy a printer, primarily to make photos from my digital
camera. I am looking for opinions on what to buy. All informed views
will be appreciated.

More about : photo printer

April 21, 2005 4:09:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"jj" <jabba112358@erols.com> wrote in message
news:AcqdnaFYZfJzdfvfRVn-1Q@rcn.net...
> I want to buy a printer, primarily to make photos from my digital
> camera. I am looking for opinions on what to buy. All informed views
> will be appreciated.
"Best" with respect to what? Best color? Longest lasting prints? Cheapest
prints? Fastest printing?

Sorry to say, these are conflicting requirements. There is no printer which
is best in every category.
Jim
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 4:26:25 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I would look into the Canon IP4000 and use OEM ink. Canon Photo Paper
Pro is the best I have used. I recently used some of Costco/Kirkland
Glossy Photo. It may be made by Ilford but I am not sure.

I cut the Costco paper into 2 4x6 and 1 5x8. The 4x6 cost a little over
4 cents. The Canon Photo Paper Pro costs 29 cents for a 4x6 sheet.
While the Canon is a little better if you look real hard, Costco is
probably 95% as good at a minimum and 1/7 the cost.

I have also tried Office Depot and Surething papers. I am going to
standardized on Costco/Kirkland.

jj wrote:

> I want to buy a printer, primarily to make photos from my digital
> camera. I am looking for opinions on what to buy. All informed views
> will be appreciated.
Related resources
April 21, 2005 6:47:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I use a canon i960, the previous generation canon with 6 color inks. It
makes beautiful prints with canon inks and also with aftermarket inks I
have been using. Canon cartridges are easier to refill if you decide to
use third party inks, and there are a few good inks that have been
recommended on this and other forums. If economics is an issue and you want
to buy aftermarket cartridges or refill them, and if archival quality is not
a big issue, then Canon is the best choice in my estimation. For permanance
of prints the newest epsons with pigmented inks are best. Canons used dye
based inks which tend to fade faster than the Epson prints.The major issue
is what you want out of the printer. If you sell prints you have to go for
pigmented inks. If you want to purchase Epson, look for posts from Arthur
Entlich on this Newsgroup as he has described the progression of inks that
Epson has gone through to improve their pigmented ink for avoidance of head
clogs and other problems. He can probably tell you which Ep;son models are
least problematic. That information is probably in this newsgroup, but you
will have to go through it and do your homework. You might want to go on to
Neil Slade's site at www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff and read all of
his information also. He leans heavily toward Canon. He also has links to
a forum - I think it is Steve's or something like that - with excellent
reviews of printers, digital cameras, etc.

"jj" <jabba112358@erols.com> wrote in message
news:AcqdnaFYZfJzdfvfRVn-1Q@rcn.net...
>I want to buy a printer, primarily to make photos from my digital camera. I
>am looking for opinions on what to buy. All informed views will be
>appreciated.
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:09:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

> I use a canon i960, the previous generation canon with 6 color inks. It
> makes beautiful prints with canon inks and also with aftermarket inks I
> have been using. Canon cartridges are easier to refill if you decide to
> use third party inks, and there are a few good inks that have been
> recommended on this and other forums. If economics is an issue and you want
> to buy aftermarket cartridges or refill them, and if archival quality is not
> a big issue, then Canon is the best choice in my estimation. For permanance
> of prints the newest epsons with pigmented inks are best. Canons used dye
> based inks which tend to fade faster than the Epson prints.The major issue
> is what you want out of the printer. If you sell prints you have to go for
> pigmented inks. If you want to purchase Epson, look for posts from Arthur
> Entlich on this Newsgroup as he has described the progression of inks that
> Epson has gone through to improve their pigmented ink for avoidance of head
> clogs and other problems. He can probably tell you which Ep;son models are
> least problematic. That information is probably in this newsgroup, but you
> will have to go through it and do your homework. You might want to go on to
> Neil Slade's site at www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff and read all of
> his information also. He leans heavily toward Canon. He also has links to
> a forum - I think it is Steve's or something like that - with excellent
> reviews of printers, digital cameras, etc.

I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
Automatic print head alignment. Connects to a camera. Two paper feed
sources. Printer profiles in the drivers.

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 21, 2005 10:09:48 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
<geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:

>
>
>Burt wrote:
>
[snip]


>
>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.

Do you mean that each color has a separate print head?

>Automatic print head alignment. Connects to a camera. Two paper feed
>sources. Printer profiles in the drivers.

CD printing?

Dye-based inks?
>
>Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 12:26:54 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"jj" <jabba112358@erols.com> wrote in message
news:AcqdnaFYZfJzdfvfRVn-1Q@rcn.net...
>I want to buy a printer, primarily to make photos from my digital camera. I am
>looking for opinions on what to buy. All informed views will be appreciated.

What is the resolution of your camera? How large a print do you want? Do you
want to print directly from the camera or camera cards? Is portability a
requirement? Here are a few choices you may want to check out:

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF02a/18972-236... lists
various of HP's Photosmart offerings. Depending on your requirements you might
consider the following that I have personally used:

Photosmart 375 is a portable 4"x6" photo printer, optional battery for
completely portable operation. It prints directly from most memory card formats
or partridge cameras. It has a 2.5" color LCD that allows selecting, zoom,
crop and a few other functions without needing a computer. See:
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF05a/18972-236...

Photosmart 7950 is a 9 ink photo printer capable of 13"x19" prints. At the
recent PMA show its prints were rated the best, beating out offerings from
Epson, Canon and others. It is also suitable as a versatile printer for text
and web pages. See:
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF05a/18972-236... .
This printer is due to be released May 1 I believe.

You might also consider an all-in-one unit, which combines the capabilities of
a photo printer with a scan, copy and fax functions. My personal favorite is
the Officejet 7410 shown at
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF05a/18972-238...,
lower end all-in-one units such as the Photosmart 2600 or 2700 series may be of
interest as well. See:
http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF02a/18972-238....
Personally the all-in-one units are my favorites - it is very easy to get
spoiled with a personal color copier.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP






All the above use HP's Vivera inks which gives better lightfastness than
traditional photo prints. See http://www.wilhelmresearch.com .
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 6:32:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> Burt wrote:
>
>> I use a canon i960, the previous generation canon with 6 color inks.
>> It makes beautiful prints with canon inks and also with aftermarket
>> inks I have been using. Canon cartridges are easier to refill if
>> you decide to use third party inks, and there are a few good inks
>> that have been recommended on this and other forums. If economics is
>> an issue and you want to buy aftermarket cartridges or refill them,
>> and if archival quality is not a big issue, then Canon is the best
>> choice in my estimation. For permanance of prints the newest epsons
>> with pigmented inks are best. Canons used dye based inks which tend
>> to fade faster than the Epson prints.The major issue is what you want
>> out of the printer. If you sell prints you have to go for pigmented
>> inks. If you want to purchase Epson, look for posts from Arthur
>> Entlich on this Newsgroup as he has described the progression of inks
>> that Epson has gone through to improve their pigmented ink for
>> avoidance of head clogs and other problems. He can probably tell you
>> which Ep;son models are least problematic. That information is
>> probably in this newsgroup, but you will have to go through it and do
>> your homework. You might want to go on to Neil Slade's site at
>> www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff and read all of his information
>> also. He leans heavily toward Canon. He also has links to a forum -
>> I think it is Steve's or something like that - with excellent reviews
>> of printers, digital cameras, etc.
>
>
> I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To
> die for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
> Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
> Automatic print head alignment. Connects to a camera. Two paper feed
> sources. Printer profiles in the drivers.


And Duplex Printing too.

Try Canon OEM ink with either Canon Photo Paper Pro or Costco/Kirkland
Glossy Paper. You made a great choice.

>
> Gary Eickmeier
April 22, 2005 3:20:30 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Lady Margaret Thatcher wrote:
> On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
> <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>Burt wrote:
>>
>
> [snip]
>
>
>
>>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
>
>
> Do you mean that each color has a separate print head?
>
>
>>Automatic print head alignment. Connects to a camera. Two paper feed
>>sources. Printer profiles in the drivers.
>
>
> CD printing?
>
> Dye-based inks?
>
>>Gary Eickmeier
>
>

http://www.canon.com.au/products/home_office/printers/c...
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 5:21:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

There is no "BEST" unless you tell us what of the following you want the
most in a printer, ranked by preference. (there's a lot more, too)

1) cheap is important

Any on-sale inkjet printer that goes for <$50. Simply buy, use
until ink cartridges are empty, then replace with another <$50 printer
(since ink cartridges cost about the same as a new printer anyways).

Give aways, hand me downs, found in trash, etc. are all good to get.
BIG college campuses like UCLA at the end of the year and quarter are
particularly good for dumpster diving.

2) Longevity is important

a) Keep in mind that all inks fade with light/air exposure - thus,
don't expect prints to last in open display longer than a few years w/o
fading (search for POV Image Epson Orange Fading website). Applies to
all inkjets.

b) Out of the box, those expensive Epsons like the 1800/2200 series
which have longer lasting inks than their regular line. Pigemented
generally lasts longer than dye based inks, but see #a above.

c) you can even buy 3rd party archival inks and papers from
www.inkjetmall.com and elsewhere, but even then, as you can see from
their longevity reports, that they don't last that long either under
direct light exposure.

d) If you're worried about lawsuits, simply do like the regular film
print companies - put in a disclaimer that you're not responsible for
any fading at all, period - because they will fade.

3) Smoother prints with less visible dots. Smaller picoliter dots like
the 1.5pl from Epson will be able to print tinier dots that are less
noticable. Also, more colors like the 9 color from HP will generally be
better than lower number of colors - but here, keep in mind that almost
any inkjet printer that runs at least 6 colors or more will produce
'photographic' prints quite easily.

4) Lower operating costs?

More ink cartridges = more cost per set of inks you need to replace.
Also, Canon carts are the easiest to refill, HP & Epson are tougher,
esp. the chipped cartridges from Epson, or the expiration dated HPs.
You can bypass the locks, but it's an extra step.

Continuous Bottle Feed ink systems from www.inkjetmall.com and
elsewhere let you print thousands of colors prints w/o a single refill -
they feed directly from huge bottles of ink retrofitted to your printer.

www.shopper.com generally gives you an idea what each printer's
print cartridge cost will be, so you can find out what the operating
costs are.

also, keep in mind that Epson generally has cheaper photo papers
than Canon which in turn is cheaper than HP. Per print operating costs
of Paper + Ink is to be kept in mind. Also, add to the per print
operating cost the price of the printer, too! An expensive printer will
make each print more costly than a dirt-cheap printer.

5) DOS/linux

You'll have to hunt down printers that have support for these OSs.

6) Thick paper

Flatter paper feeds such as the top in, bottom out feeds of some
Canon and Epson printers are better than HP and some Canon U-feed
designs. These can definitely jam up on thicker paper, or not feed at all.

7) double-sided

Here, only a few printers from Canon and HP have auto-double-sided
printing

8) flash card slot

Only a few from each maker have these to print directly from digital
camera flash cards

9) scanning?

Only a few from each maker can print photo prints, scan/copy in
color, and even fewer still (like the Epsons) have built-in scan
directly to flash cards w/o a PC, or scanning of 35mm films.

R500/600 series from Epson are examples of some that have a truck
load of these nice features.

10) n-up on one page support, borderless printing, etc.

A lot of other features are only available on some makes and models,
such as poster printing, n-up on one page printing, manual double-sided
printing, etc, etc.
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 6:30:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 14:00:18 -0700, Lady Margaret Thatcher
<Was_at_10_Downing_Street@bad_for_the_UK.org> wrote:

>On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
><geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>Burt wrote:
>>
>[snip]
>
>
>>
>>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
>
>Do you mean that each color has a separate print head?
>
>>Automatic print head alignment. Connects to a camera. Two paper feed
>>sources. Printer profiles in the drivers.
>
>CD printing?
>
>Dye-based inks?
>>
>>Gary Eickmeier



And Print heads that don't last or the Prints..

You are Joking..
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 6:30:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 14:30:57 +1200, CSE <cse@noware.comn>
wrote:

>>On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
>><geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:

>>>Burt wrote:
>>>
>>>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>>>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>>>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.

>And Print heads that don't last or the Prints..
>
>You are Joking..

I'm curious about that..Why do you say the heads don't last?
Are you saying it's characteristic of Canon, or of that particular
model?
Anonymous
April 22, 2005 6:30:59 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

_R wrote:

>On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 14:30:57 +1200, CSE <cse@noware.comn>
>wrote:
>
>
>
>>>On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
>>><geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>
>
>
>>>>Burt wrote:
>>>>
>>>>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>>>>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>>>>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
>>>>
>>>>
>
>
>
>>And Print heads that don't last or the Prints..
>>
>>You are Joking..
>>
>>
>
>I'm curious about that..Why do you say the heads don't last?
>Are you saying it's characteristic of Canon, or of that particular
>model?
>
>
>

I have not found any of this to be true. Maybe these people are using
some crummy after market ink. Who knows. I have a Pixma printer since
last October and have had no problems at all. I do not print a great
deal since I have another printer that I use more for business
documents. I did use a set of the all of the colors.

You made a great choice.
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 2:16:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 00:32:45 -0400, _R <_R@nomail.org> wrote:

>On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 14:30:57 +1200, CSE <cse@noware.comn>
>wrote:
>
>>>On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 18:09:47 GMT, Gary Eickmeier
>>><geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:
>
>>>>Burt wrote:
>>>>
>>>>I just upgraded from the i950 to the iP8500, and what a printer! To die
>>>>for! Eight colors, and brilliant, accurate color in the prints.
>>>>Astounding. Individually replaceable, including the print head.
>
>>And Print heads that don't last or the Prints..
>>
>>You are Joking..
>
>I'm curious about that..Why do you say the heads don't last?
>Are you saying it's characteristic of Canon, or of that particular
>model?

It's characteristic of Canon. On Epson's the problem can be clogging.
On Canon's the print head burns out. Of course, in both cases, it
depends how much you use it.

--

Hecate - The Real One
Hecate@newsguy.com
Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 2:17:27 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Fri, 22 Apr 2005 05:21:25 GMT, measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
wrote:


>
>I have not found any of this to be true. Maybe these people are using
>some crummy after market ink. Who knows. I have a Pixma printer since
>last October and have had no problems at all. I do not print a great
>deal since I have another printer that I use more for business
>documents. I did use a set of the all of the colors.
>
>You made a great choice.

Oh wow, a whole 6 months and the print head hasn't burnt out.

Of course it hasn't, even bloody Lexmarks still work after 6 months
(after a fashion).

--

Hecate - The Real One
Hecate@newsguy.com
Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 2:47:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Low cost and doesn't clog. Buy HP. The cartridges cost more but
> they're generally bulletproof for low cost, low volume printing.

General concurrence with this thought.

One caveat: HP install/uninstall software, in my experience,
sometimes fails. And sometimes their drivers are
buggy. In both regards, much more so than Canons, Epsons,
or Lexmarks. One can generally work around those issues,
but they do exist.

-- stan
Anonymous
April 23, 2005 4:44:19 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Sorry to break this to you Bob, but just like how HP paid Spencer Lab
to post "favorable" results for them, here too HP was the only entrant
in all categories except for the 9 inches to 17 inches wide.
April 23, 2005 4:54:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Great post, David. The reality is that all brands of inkjet printers (and
all devices in general) have pros and cons. No device lasts for ever, and
each has its own way of self destructing. Whatever printer one purchases,
it is a good idea to become more educated through reading of newsgroups and
forums to learn about alternate inks and papers, trouble shooting and
simple fixes. For instance, there are ways of clearing head clogs that will
help forestall a new printer purchase when an old one doesn't print well.
The most comprehensive place for finding information on printer maintenance
would be Arthur Entlich for Epson at www.artistic@telus.net (when
requested, he will email you his instructions on diagnosing and clearing
Epson print head clogs) and Neil Slade's site at
www.neilslade.com/papers/inkjetstuff .

"David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message
news:D 4bmcm$kmr$1@news.service.uci.edu...
> There is no "BEST" unless you tell us what of the following you want the
> most in a printer, ranked by preference. (there's a lot more, too)
>
> 1) cheap is important
>
> Any on-sale inkjet printer that goes for <$50. Simply buy, use until
> ink cartridges are empty, then replace with another <$50 printer (since
> ink cartridges cost about the same as a new printer anyways).
>
> Give aways, hand me downs, found in trash, etc. are all good to get.
> BIG college campuses like UCLA at the end of the year and quarter are
> particularly good for dumpster diving.
>
> 2) Longevity is important
>
> a) Keep in mind that all inks fade with light/air exposure - thus,
> don't expect prints to last in open display longer than a few years w/o
> fading (search for POV Image Epson Orange Fading website). Applies to all
> inkjets.
>
> b) Out of the box, those expensive Epsons like the 1800/2200 series
> which have longer lasting inks than their regular line. Pigemented
> generally lasts longer than dye based inks, but see #a above.
>
> c) you can even buy 3rd party archival inks and papers from
> www.inkjetmall.com and elsewhere, but even then, as you can see from their
> longevity reports, that they don't last that long either under direct
> light exposure.
>
> d) If you're worried about lawsuits, simply do like the regular film
> print companies - put in a disclaimer that you're not responsible for any
> fading at all, period - because they will fade.
>
> 3) Smoother prints with less visible dots. Smaller picoliter dots like
> the 1.5pl from Epson will be able to print tinier dots that are less
> noticable. Also, more colors like the 9 color from HP will generally be
> better than lower number of colors - but here, keep in mind that almost
> any inkjet printer that runs at least 6 colors or more will produce
> 'photographic' prints quite easily.
>
> 4) Lower operating costs?
>
> More ink cartridges = more cost per set of inks you need to replace.
> Also, Canon carts are the easiest to refill, HP & Epson are tougher,
> esp. the chipped cartridges from Epson, or the expiration dated HPs. You
> can bypass the locks, but it's an extra step.
>
> Continuous Bottle Feed ink systems from www.inkjetmall.com and
> elsewhere let you print thousands of colors prints w/o a single refill -
> they feed directly from huge bottles of ink retrofitted to your printer.
>
> www.shopper.com generally gives you an idea what each printer's print
> cartridge cost will be, so you can find out what the operating costs are.
>
> also, keep in mind that Epson generally has cheaper photo papers than
> Canon which in turn is cheaper than HP. Per print operating costs of
> Paper + Ink is to be kept in mind. Also, add to the per print operating
> cost the price of the printer, too! An expensive printer will make each
> print more costly than a dirt-cheap printer.
>
> 5) DOS/linux
>
> You'll have to hunt down printers that have support for these OSs.
>
> 6) Thick paper
>
> Flatter paper feeds such as the top in, bottom out feeds of some Canon
> and Epson printers are better than HP and some Canon U-feed designs.
> These can definitely jam up on thicker paper, or not feed at all.
>
> 7) double-sided
>
> Here, only a few printers from Canon and HP have auto-double-sided
> printing
>
> 8) flash card slot
>
> Only a few from each maker have these to print directly from digital
> camera flash cards
>
> 9) scanning?
>
> Only a few from each maker can print photo prints, scan/copy in color,
> and even fewer still (like the Epsons) have built-in scan directly to
> flash cards w/o a PC, or scanning of 35mm films.
>
> R500/600 series from Epson are examples of some that have a truck load
> of these nice features.
>
> 10) n-up on one page support, borderless printing, etc.
>
> A lot of other features are only available on some makes and models,
> such as poster printing, n-up on one page printing, manual double-sided
> printing, etc, etc.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 4:04:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

> And Duplex Printing too.
>
> Try Canon OEM ink with either Canon Photo Paper Pro or Costco/Kirkland
> Glossy Paper. You made a great choice.

I love the way the ink cartridges snap in so easily, and the software
tells you when they are short and running out. The auto head alignment
is a bonus I didn't even know about.

I have found that the Canons will print on most anything, but the Epson
and Canon papers are particularly compatible, and the best. Fun
experimenting with a lot of different surfaces.

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 10:56:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> measekite wrote:
>
>> And Duplex Printing too.
>>
>> Try Canon OEM ink with either Canon Photo Paper Pro or
>> Costco/Kirkland Glossy Paper. You made a great choice.
>
>
> I love the way the ink cartridges snap in so easily, and the software
> tells you when they are short and running out. The auto head alignment
> is a bonus I didn't even know about.
>
> I have found that the Canons will print on most anything, but the
> Epson and Canon papers are particularly compatible, and the best. Fun
> experimenting with a lot of different surfaces.
>
> Gary Eickmeier


I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 8:23:25 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
> work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
> tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
> prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
> sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
> quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.

You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a pain
- what cutter can do this so well?

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 8:23:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> measekite wrote:
>
>> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
>> work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
>> tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
>> prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an
>> 8.5x11 sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no
>> difference in quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>
>
> You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a pain
> - what cutter can do this so well?
>


I use an even more archaic method . . .

I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.

With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.

While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
(two printers). Works great for me.

-Taliesyn
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 8:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> measekite wrote:
>
>> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they
>> will work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very
>> best I tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To
>> compare 4x6 prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut
>> from an 8.5x11 sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost
>> no difference in quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>
>
> You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a
> pain - what cutter can do this so well?
>
> Gary Eickmeier


I do not mind. I purchased an inexpensive Fiskars Branded rotary paper
cutter that I purchased at Costco for $29.00/ It works very well. I
cut the sheet with the glossy side up. I either get 2 4x6 and a 5x7 or
3 4x6 depending on my needs. I cut 10 sheets at a time that gives me 30
blanks. I never timed myself but it is around 15 minutes. I never cut
more than one sheet at a time even though the cutter specifications
provides for more. Try it and see what you think. The paper is great
and I do not have to worry that it will do any damage to my printer.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:56:43 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Taliesyn wrote:

> I use an even more archaic method . . .
>
> I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
> associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
> I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.
>
> With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
> seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
> press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
> gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.
>
> While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
> iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
> if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
> off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
> affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
> (two printers). Works great for me.
>
> -Taliesyn

I just haven't found a good cutter that doesn't turn the paper as it
cuts, making for a curved or angled side rather than ruler straight.
Your method may do it straighter, but seems to be more trouble.

Have you tried printing (a four-shot) first, then cutting?

Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 9:56:44 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> Taliesyn wrote:
>
>> I use an even more archaic method . . .
>>
>> I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
>> associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
>> I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.
>>
>> With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
>> seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
>> press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
>> gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.
>>
>> While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
>> iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
>> if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
>> off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
>> affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
>> (two printers). Works great for me.
>>
>> -Taliesyn
>
>
> I just haven't found a good cutter that doesn't turn the paper as it
> cuts, making for a curved or angled side rather than ruler straight.
> Your method may do it straighter, but seems to be more trouble.
>

Yes, most people won't go for a method that involves a lot of
manipulations. It doesn't bother me the least bit. I like the fact
that I get a new, razor sharp blade every time I use it, simply by
breaking off a blade segment.

> Have you tried printing (a four-shot) first, then cutting?
>
> Gary Eickmeier

No, I set up my printer software, Serif PagePlus, for one photo at a
time. I've made three separate setups: 4x6, 5x7, and a shared
8x10/8.5x11. The simple 4x6 setup, for example, has 4 red layout
lines that always stay visible on top - any photo will always be behind
the red layout lines. Then I just bring in a photo and stretch and
compose to fit and suit my fancy. The printed area will only be that
which is within the red layout lines. Any overlapping excess will not
print because the document page size is also set to 4x6. Anyway, that's
the reason I can't print 4 on one page, I'm using a single setup.
Putting 4 on a page would also make them an off-standard size, no? I'm
only paying about 7 cents (Canadian) for a 4x6 sheet using Costco
Kirkland Paper. So I see no real economical gain by cramming 4 photos
on a sheet.

-Taliesyn
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 10:08:21 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Taliesyn wrote:

> Gary Eickmeier wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> measekite wrote:
>>
>>> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they
>>> will work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very
>>> best I tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To
>>> compare 4x6 prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland
>>> (cut from an 8.5x11 sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and
>>> almost no difference in quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>>
>>
>>
>> You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a
>> pain - what cutter can do this so well?
>>
>
>
> I use an even more archaic method . . .
>
> I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
> associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
> I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.
>
> With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
> seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
> press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
> gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.
>
> While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
> iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
> if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
> off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
> affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
> (two printers). Works great for me.
>
> -Taliesyn


I did that before getting a Fiskars. It was a pain in the ass. $30 is
cheap for a little convenience.
Anonymous
April 24, 2005 10:11:50 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Gary Eickmeier wrote:

>
>
> Taliesyn wrote:
>
>> I use an even more archaic method . . .
>>
>> I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
>> associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
>> I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.
>>
>> With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
>> seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
>> press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
>> gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.
>>
>> While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
>> iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
>> if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
>> off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
>> affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
>> (two printers). Works great for me.
>>
>> -Taliesyn
>
>
> I just haven't found a good cutter that doesn't turn the paper as it
> cuts, making for a curved or angled side rather than ruler straight.
> Your method may do it straighter, but seems to be more trouble.
>
> Have you tried printing (a four-shot) first, then cutting?
>
> Gary Eickmeier


I use the Fiskars to cut single sheets. They make a special model for
Costco with the Fiskars name on it. It is the same mechanical but has a
nicer appearance with an aluminum bed that is ruled in black. After you
place the paper on the bed where you want it close the locking lever.
It is still a good idea to hold with a clean hand but the locking bar
does hold the paper securely.
April 25, 2005 2:09:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I have a guillotine type paper cutter left over from my darkroom days. It
must be 40 years old! It has an adjustable paper guide on it that permits
lining up the paper for each cut extremely easily. before I had the canon
i960 which does borderless prints, I experimented with printing three on a
page and then cutting them apart. One had to be much more careful with
aligning the paper on the cutter, and there is no guide that showed the
exact line of the cut. I had to kind of eyeball it. Much easier with the
paper guide set to cut a whole box of paper into 4x6's at one time while
watching some dumb tv or news program. My paper cutter, unfortunately, is
not the most expensive or most accurate, so it doesn't quite cut the most
accurate right angle. It is so close, however, that the prints look great.
You would have to use a drafting triangle or other instrument to see the
inaccuracy. I do use the steel straight edge technique and knife (utility
knife with new blade and cutting against a piece of plywood scrap from my
workshop) for trimming the edges from larger prints.

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1KPae.24745$_t3.18856@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>
> measekite wrote:
>
>> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
>> work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
>> tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
>> prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
>> sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
>> quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>
> You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a pain -
> what cutter can do this so well?
>
> Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 9:01:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The Fiskars rotary cutter is quite accurate. It also has the advantage of
using optional wheels for scoring and perforating. I even used one at my
last print shop for low volume perf and score jobs when the setup of my
bigger equipment would take too much time. You can get them at Sam's Club or
Office Depot for less than $50 (12" model) and if you have a Michaels store
nearby, they are even less expensive (especially with the weekly 40% off
coupon). It is just one of many photo trimmers on the market, but is a cost
effective one. I also use an inexpensive Boston guillotine cutter and it
does a good job. The key to getting consistent cuts with either trimmer is
to use a stop block so that each sheet is positioned exactly in the same
spot. A small piece of chipboard taped to the cutter bed works fine. Try
using a couple of sheets of scrap paper to get a better cutting surface and
that will help reduce the problem of paper skew. If I really want to save
time, I'll take a couple of boxes of paper to my old print shop and use the
hydraulic cutter.
--
Ron Cohen

"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
news:v5Rae.21690$5f.6800@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>
> Taliesyn wrote:
>
>> I use an even more archaic method . . .
>>
>> I use the same full page size sheets too. Like everything else
>> associated with printing, you don't need an expensive "OEM" cutter.
>> I use a mini "exacta" type knife cheap dollar store refill blades.
>>
>> With a metal ruler and a scrap photo as a template, it takes but a few
>> seconds to cut a 4x6, or what have you. Tip: Use the small exacta, don't
>> press hard on the knife, it'll leave a ridge. Don't rush it, make a few
>> gentle passes with the blade before cutting through.
>>
>> While the first photo is printing (it takes about 4 minutes on my
>> iP5000 at 9600 dpi) i've cut up most of the sheets I plan to use. Then
>> if I'm pressed for time I can use both printers simultaneously to run
>> off the photos. I get the job done efficiently (assembly line method),
>> affordably (non OEM inks, paper and blades) and with little wasted time
>> (two printers). Works great for me.
>>
>> -Taliesyn
>
> I just haven't found a good cutter that doesn't turn the paper as it cuts,
> making for a curved or angled side rather than ruler straight. Your method
> may do it straighter, but seems to be more trouble.
>
> Have you tried printing (a four-shot) first, then cutting?
>
> Gary Eickmeier
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 9:01:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

A rotary paper cutter is the safest and easiest to use. I bought the
Fiskars at Costco for $29.00. At the same price Staples is selling the
Carl. I like the Fiskars sold at Costco because it is black ruled
against an aluminum bed and has a locking bar to hold the paper in place.

I also have and never use guillotine cutter as I felt $29.00 is worth
the accuracy and ease of use.

Of course when I get a wide bed printer I will need to get a much more
expensive one that will do over 20 inches.

Burt wrote:

>I have a guillotine type paper cutter left over from my darkroom days. It
>must be 40 years old! It has an adjustable paper guide on it that permits
>lining up the paper for each cut extremely easily. before I had the canon
>i960 which does borderless prints, I experimented with printing three on a
>page and then cutting them apart. One had to be much more careful with
>aligning the paper on the cutter, and there is no guide that showed the
>exact line of the cut. I had to kind of eyeball it. Much easier with the
>paper guide set to cut a whole box of paper into 4x6's at one time while
>watching some dumb tv or news program. My paper cutter, unfortunately, is
>not the most expensive or most accurate, so it doesn't quite cut the most
>accurate right angle. It is so close, however, that the prints look great.
>You would have to use a drafting triangle or other instrument to see the
>inaccuracy. I do use the steel straight edge technique and knife (utility
>knife with new blade and cutting against a piece of plywood scrap from my
>workshop) for trimming the edges from larger prints.
>
>"Gary Eickmeier" <geickmei@tampabay.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:1KPae.24745$_t3.18856@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
>
>>measekite wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
>>>work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
>>>tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
>>>prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
>>>sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
>>>quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>>>
>>>
>>You mean you're buying 8.5x11 paper and cutting it yourself? What a pain -
>>what cutter can do this so well?
>>
>>Gary Eickmeier
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 9:21:58 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Ron Cohen wrote:

>The Fiskars rotary cutter is quite accurate. It also has the advantage of
>using optional wheels for scoring and perforating. I even used one at my
>last print shop for low volume perf and score jobs when the setup of my
>bigger equipment would take too much time. You can get them at Sam's Club or
>Office Depot for less than $50 (12" model)
>

Costco for $29.00

>and if you have a Michaels store
>nearby, they are even less expensive (especially with the weekly 40% off
>coupon). It is just one of many photo trimmers on the market, but is a cost
>effective one. I also use an inexpensive Boston guillotine cutter and it
>does a good job. The key to getting consistent cuts with either trimmer is
>to use a stop block so that each sheet is positioned exactly in the same
>spot. A small piece of chipboard taped to the cutter bed works fine. Try
>using a couple of sheets of scrap paper to get a better cutting surface and
>that will help reduce the problem of paper skew. If I really want to save
>time, I'll take a couple of boxes of paper to my old print shop and use the
>hydraulic cutter.
>
>
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 6:30:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> I do not mind. I purchased an inexpensive Fiskars Branded rotary paper
> cutter that I purchased at Costco for $29.00/ It works very well. I
> cut the sheet with the glossy side up. I either get 2 4x6 and a 5x7 or

even better was when HP was mailing out their wide-format inkjet
glossy paper samples years ago - take those huge multi-foot square rolls
and cut them up to size! Took forever, but heck, free inkjet paper to
last a lifetime!
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 6:32:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

speed & pressure are the key to a straighter cut for me on my rotary.

Basically, faster you go, the straighter the cut - paper doesn't have
time to curl back up.
Pressure is key to keeping the paper aligned - so press hard enough to
hold the paper in place.

----

Otherwise, you'd have to go with a commerical cutter ala Kinkos
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 6:13:28 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite (measekite@yahoo.com) writes:
> Gary Eickmeier wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> measekite wrote:
>>
>>> And Duplex Printing too.
>>>
>>> Try Canon OEM ink with either Canon Photo Paper Pro or
>>> Costco/Kirkland Glossy Paper. You made a great choice.
>>
>>
>> I love the way the ink cartridges snap in so easily, and the software
>> tells you when they are short and running out. The auto head alignment
>> is a bonus I didn't even know about.
>>
>> I have found that the Canons will print on most anything, but the
>> Epson and Canon papers are particularly compatible, and the best. Fun
>> experimenting with a lot of different surfaces.
>>
>> Gary Eickmeier
>
>
> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
> work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
> tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
> prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
> sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
> quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.

The Costco/Kirkland paper works fine also with Epson printers - almost
as good as Epson brands and quite cheaper.

Pavel
May 9, 2005 7:04:56 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

When Costco sold Epson Glossy photo paper ($20 for 120 sheets), I used it
for all my glossy photo printing in my Canon I960. Costco subsequently
stopped selling it and has their own brand, Kirkland, which produces equally
fine prints with a smoother, glossier surface. The Epson Glossy paper has
one benefit that the Kirkland lacks - you can print or write on the back.
Although the back has a very faint epson logo printed in a repeat pattern, I
have used this paper for two sided printing for holiday greeting cards.
When OfficMax has it on sale as a two-for-one I buy a few packages to keep
on hand for that purpose. No one seems to notice the logo on the back as it
is so faint. Epson double sided Matte paper works extremely well with Canon
printers as well. It is reasonably heavy stock and prints well on both
sides. It is also useful for printing greeting cards on both sides. Photos
have a more vivid appearance on the glossy paper, but both papers perform
well.

BTW, I noticed that the response to your email included a reference to OEM
inks. You will notice several posts on this NG about OEM vs. non-OEM inks
and you will see several people, myself included, who have used non-OEM inks
very successfully in contrast to one person who does not use it but
discourages people from doing so. In my Canon printer selected non-OEM inks
have performed every bit as well as Canon OEM inks with no clogging or any
other problems. It is, however, important to avoid poor quality inks. If
you are interested I would suggest that you read all the posts referring to
this issue in this newsgroup. I don't wish to get back into arguing about
inks on the newsgoup. Everything that could be said HAS been said! If you
would like more information you can take the nospam out of my email address
and send me any questions you have. Just mention "newsgoup response" and I
will be glad to give you some references for more information.

"Pavel Dvorak" <ah772@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
news:D 5mh08$jgd$1@theodyn.ncf.ca...
>
> measekite (measekite@yahoo.com) writes:
>> Gary Eickmeier wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> measekite wrote:
>>>
>>>> And Duplex Printing too.
>>>>
>>>> Try Canon OEM ink with either Canon Photo Paper Pro or
>>>> Costco/Kirkland Glossy Paper. You made a great choice.
>>>
>>>
>>> I love the way the ink cartridges snap in so easily, and the software
>>> tells you when they are short and running out. The auto head alignment
>>> is a bonus I didn't even know about.
>>>
>>> I have found that the Canons will print on most anything, but the
>>> Epson and Canon papers are particularly compatible, and the best. Fun
>>> experimenting with a lot of different surfaces.
>>>
>>> Gary Eickmeier
>>
>>
>> I have not tried Epson paper but Canon Tech Support does say they will
>> work well in a Canon. While Canon Photo Paper Pro is the very best I
>> tried, Costco/Kirkland Glossy paper is so very close. To compare 4x6
>> prices the Canon is 29 cents and the Costco/Kirkland (cut from an 8.5x11
>> sheet) is 4 cents. Based on the economics and almost no difference in
>> quality I am now using the Kirkland paper.
>
> The Costco/Kirkland paper works fine also with Epson printers - almost
> as good as Epson brands and quite cheaper.
>
> Pavel
!