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Raptor 150Gb does not seem to load windows up any faster???!

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  • Raptor
  • Storage
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July 3, 2006 6:15:40 AM

I have installed a fresh copy of windows onto my new Raptor 150Gb.... I havent noticed a preformance gain interms of loading up windows.

The only massive preformance difference I actually noticed was the full format!

Shouldnt the raptor load up windows faster than a normal 7200RMP HD????

More about : raptor 150gb load windows faster

July 3, 2006 10:14:15 AM

Quote:
For some odd reason Raptors load windows slower than most drives, I can't answer why... Just look at these results...
http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/06/29/seagate_750_gb_b...

What HD is the Raptor replacing?

@F1nal_0men: That's news to me, and Tom's HD chart doesn't help your theory, as the only HD to load Windows faster than the 74GB & 150GB Raptors in that chart, is the Hitachi 7K500. :?
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July 3, 2006 1:34:27 PM

Quote:
@F1nal_0men: That's news to me, and Tom's HD chart doesn't help your theory, as the only HD to load Windows faster than the 74GB & 150GB Raptors in that chart, is the Hitachi 7K500. :?


Oops, I pulled a nub moment, thinking those numbers were time in seconds. Hmmm, why would a raptor take longer to load windows than a normal HD then? Do you have raid? If not then what was your previous drive. Even though the Raptors are faster HDDs, it may not be fast enough to notice an imporovement in something like windows startup. Sorry for the false information earlier... :oops: 
July 3, 2006 2:09:43 PM

I would say a raptor is 20-30 % faster on startup, what do you guys think?
maybe 20% is not enough for you to notice it without a stopwatch...
July 3, 2006 2:10:34 PM

To be honest, who cares about Windows startup time? I bought the Raptor to decrease application load times, and that it does very nicely. Very, very nicely.

The 16MB cache helps out with my 74GB...
July 3, 2006 2:56:36 PM

...well, even with a faster hdd, the cpu and your subsystem still has to process and initialize things, loading drivers and such... like, take an iRAM drive for example... you would expect windows to boot up instantaneously with it, partially because it has an access time under 100ns, very fast transfer rates, and theres no mechanical moving parts at all to speak of really... but its pretty much still waiting on other things to finish, depending on how much you have installed in your system, hardware and software... which is why a fresh windows installation, right after installation, with nothing installed, drivers or other software, boots up so quickly... theres nothing it has to really wait on at all, to initialize or anything.
July 3, 2006 3:08:33 PM

I think he might have been reading the charts backwards, i.e., he though smaller numbers were faster.
July 3, 2006 6:30:29 PM

Quote:
I think he might have been reading the charts backwards, i.e., he though smaller numbers were faster.
Happens to the best of us. :wink:
July 3, 2006 7:30:23 PM

Quote:
...well, even with a faster hdd, the cpu and your subsystem still has to process and initialize things, loading drivers and such... like, take an iRAM drive for example... you would expect windows to boot up instantaneously with it, partially because it has an access time under 100ns, very fast transfer rates, and theres no mechanical moving parts at all to speak of really... but its pretty much still waiting on other things to finish, depending on how much you have installed in your system, hardware and software... which is why a fresh windows installation, right after installation, with nothing installed, drivers or other software, boots up so quickly... theres nothing it has to really wait on at all, to initialize or anything.


Choirbass wins for the closest correct answer :) 

Actually, most enthusiest systems won't see a major decrease in boot-up time BEFORE GINA (The windows logon screen) with a better hard drive system. This is because the blue progress bar indicates that a basic windows kernel has initialized, and each low-level driver that has been registered with windows needs to initialize. This is more dependant upon how much hardware, what brand of hardware, on which bus the hardware sits, and what drivers are present.

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/r...

Scroll down to Detect and Configure Hardware Phase.

If you install windows fresh, and do not install any drivers, this will likely give you the fastest boot time (for most hardware), though some hardware will lag the bus if not initialized properly.

In short, the raptor will help AFTER logging on when your system tray starts loading 432793453209475345 items at once, while your user-level software initalizes. If you want to decrease your load time, consider the following alternatives:

1) Change your ACPI standby mode to S3 - Suspend to RAM in your BIOS. Then use standby instead of shutdown when you turn off your computer. You'll have instant-on capabilities. Every now and then, depending on the quality of RAM and the RF shield capabilities of the case (metal cases are better), the stored data in the RAM while your computer was off will corrupt, and you have to boot normal. It's like once every 3 months. You don't lose any permanent info. You can even suspend with a game running :) 

2) Disable any unused peripherals in your BIOS. NTLDR will not detect them, and thus not try and load the drivers. I usually disable my firewire, secondary HDD controller, floppy controller, and I tweak my ACPI settings.

3) Update your drivers at least every 6 months. Driver improvements usually improve hardware initialization times.

4) Create a restore point and start tweaking your driver list. I do this by opening up the Device manager and uninstalling any drivers I know I don't need. The worst offender for long hardware initialization is Sound Card hardware. It's bad enough it's usually on the PCI bus, but it installs game port drivers, midi drivers, etc. You don't need most of them, but keep in mind that removing pieces of drivers may cause other drivers to fail, so that's why you must create a restore point (in case you break something important).

5) DEFRAG YOUR DRIVE!!!! Use diskkeeper if you can: the defrag in windows sucks hardcore.

6) RAID 0 improves raw throughput and handles grinding through startup much better than a single drive.

7) Make sure your drive is on a controller that supports NCQ, and NCQ is enabled.


I hope this helps. You'll probably see like a 0.50 - 2.00 second better boot time with a raptor, but you can get much better results by just tweaking your system (and it's free ;) )
July 3, 2006 7:35:59 PM

Unless you use a Raptor and tweak...but that's just crazy-talk...
July 4, 2006 2:40:00 PM

Quote:
I think he might have been reading the charts backwards, i.e., he though smaller numbers were faster.
Happens to the best of us. :wink:

And to the worsed of us too 8O
July 4, 2006 3:25:44 PM

Quote:
I have installed a fresh copy of windows onto my new Raptor 150Gb.... I havent noticed a preformance gain interms of loading up windows.

The only massive preformance difference I actually noticed was the full format!

Shouldnt the raptor load up windows faster than a normal 7200RMP HD????

welcome to the real world
July 6, 2006 5:30:44 PM

Quote:
I have installed a fresh copy of windows onto my new Raptor 150Gb.... I havent noticed a preformance gain interms of loading up windows.

The only massive preformance difference I actually noticed was the full format!

Shouldnt the raptor load up windows faster than a normal 7200RMP HD????

welcome to the real world

Damn it you took my answer.
!