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CPU is running at over 100 degrees C??

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July 3, 2006 7:29:41 PM

Hi all,

My friend and I put together my new system last night and were up until about 3 am trying to figure out why it's running so hot. It seems like either the heatsink is defective (which seems unlikely as it's a piece of aluminum and the fan does change speeds accordingly), or the heat sensor is out of whack. Is the heat sensor part of the CPU itself or is it on the motherboard? The other possibility is that the CPU really is running that hot and it's just defective. I tried to call Intel today, but they're closed for July 4th.

The only thing I haven't tried is a BIOS update. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
July 3, 2006 7:45:35 PM

are you checking the temp is POST/ BIOS or are you using a software? If its a software maybe its giving you wrong readings.
July 3, 2006 7:46:41 PM

Quote:
Hi all,

My friend and I put together my new system last night and were up until about 3 am trying to figure out why it's running so hot. It seems like either the heatsink is defective (which seems unlikely as it's a piece of aluminum and the fan does change speeds accordingly), or the heat sensor is out of whack. Is the heat sensor part of the CPU itself or is it on the motherboard? The other possibility is that the CPU really is running that hot and it's just defective. I tried to call Intel today, but they're closed for July 4th.

The only thing I haven't tried is a BIOS update. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

Give us the Honour of Listing and Specifying every part of your computer and CPU and thermal compund you are using. It'll be easyer to help you if we know what'd been built and what exactly is the name and make of the thing that is giving you the problems with heat
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July 3, 2006 7:47:48 PM

That will really burn your thigh. :lol: 
July 3, 2006 7:48:00 PM

Quote:
are you checking the temp is POST/ BIOS or are you using a software? If its a software maybe its giving you wrong readings.
Could be wrong readings or Could just be a brand new "prescott' we gotta know what exacty it is so if they list something that is know to give problems and we can help. Otherwise advise on better thermal paste
July 3, 2006 7:50:57 PM

To answer the first question, this reading is from the BIOS hardware monitor. We built the system last night and were just testing it to see if it POSTed, haven't installed an OS yet.

As for the specifics, it's an Intel Pentium D 930 3.0 GHz running on an Intel D945GTP motherboard. I have 2GB of OCZ dual-channel DDR667 and a Maxtor 300GB SATA2 hard drive. I'm running it off of the on-board video at the moment. The case is an Antec Sonata II with the stock 450W PSU.
July 3, 2006 7:52:07 PM

Oh, and the thermal paste is the "square" that was on the heatsink when we took it out of the box...
July 3, 2006 8:01:06 PM

I think could be bad readings... your CPU would not run a 100°C for more than a few seconds.
For information, the temp sensor is a diode embedded in the CPU die, the circuit that convert its voltage drop to temp readings is in the chipset or (more often today) a separated small chip on the mobo.
Sure you are not reading temps in °F instead of °C?
July 3, 2006 8:04:13 PM

I'm positive that it's in C...what's strange also is that the system temps seem fairly normal. Internal is registering at 40-45 and remote is 33-36. I could try a BIOS update I suppose; if that doesn't work I guess it's warranty time.

Thanks
July 3, 2006 8:16:56 PM

I have a few things to consider. When you put the computer together did you use the stock heatsink? If you did sometimes they put a thermal pad on the bottom of the HS. If it did have a pad did you take off the sticker protecting the pad? If it didn't have a pad did you use thermal grease and how much? If you used thermal grease, the amount you should use is no more than the center of the O on your keyboard. And the area of the O might be a little too much. Too much grease is just like having no grease at all. So clean it off with an isopropol alcohol (look it up or if someone could reply to tell what kind to use). Then dab a small amount of grease on the CPU, then take a toothpick and smear it around. After it is spread take a flat object (a credit card works well) and scrape it across the top to make it smooth. Reattach the HS and you should see a difference. Don't forget to clean the HS and the CPU. Hope this helps.
July 3, 2006 8:26:25 PM

As long as you put the HS on it and didn't take it off again...only put it on and left it...then I wouldn't worry about it and install the OS. I don't think it would run at 100c to tell you the truth. Load the OS.

If you fiddled around with the HS, then you're going to have to remove all that putty and replace it with some paste.
July 3, 2006 8:36:03 PM

Quote:
Oh, and the thermal paste is the "square" that was on the heatsink when we took it out of the box...


Not sure, but did it have a thin transparent film on it?

Basically the film protects the compound before installation, so it does need to come of before you install it.
July 3, 2006 8:37:26 PM

I used the stock heatsink with the thermal compound that was already on it and we did make sure to remove the sticker. After putting on the HS and ensuring that it was put on correctly, we didn't take it off again.

If it is actually running that hot, isn't it a bad idea to continue running it? I suppose I can see if Windows installs, then maybe use a software-based hardware monitor (but I was under the impression that they still use the BIOS to get their readings)
July 3, 2006 8:41:14 PM

I doubt it is running that hot. As long as the HS is seated properly, it should be OK. I think the CPU would shut down the system if were actually running at 100C, but as long as you mounted it correctly then I doubt it is getting that hot and the reading is false.
July 3, 2006 8:41:28 PM

Well, to be on the safe side, I would double check it, or redo the HSF installation (cleaning it off with at least 70 percent Isopropyl Alcohol) with a tube of thermal compound or AS5.

If the HeatSink is cool to the touch, that can be an indication that there is no or bad contact between the top of the CPU to the bottom of the HSF.
July 3, 2006 8:46:02 PM

Okay, I'll try reapplying the HS. If that fails, then I guess I'll call up Intel tomorrow and see what they tell me.

Thanks for the replies all.
July 3, 2006 8:54:53 PM

You have some thermal paste right, cause once you take that HS off you can't reuse that putty that was on the HS.
July 3, 2006 9:22:53 PM

Yes, I have lots of that lying around...thanks :) 
July 3, 2006 9:24:13 PM

The easiest way to find out is to touch the base of the heatsink, if it's hot it's probably around 50 degrees, uncomfortable to touch for more than a second or so 60, sears the flesh on your fingers than it really is 100 degrees.
July 3, 2006 9:34:43 PM

True, but if it's not making good contact with the CPU then it won't be getting much heat.
a b à CPUs
July 3, 2006 10:04:33 PM

god dam list some system specs, where u got the temps

and btw yeah - your system still works? then it aint 100's

Quote:
Hi all,

My friend and I put together my new system last night and were up until about 3 am trying to figure out why it's running so hot. It seems like either the heatsink is defective (which seems unlikely as it's a piece of aluminum and the fan does change speeds accordingly), or the heat sensor is out of whack. Is the heat sensor part of the CPU itself or is it on the motherboard? The other possibility is that the CPU really is running that hot and it's just defective. I tried to call Intel today, but they're closed for July 4th.

The only thing I haven't tried is a BIOS update. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
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