Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

A UPS that would keep 5 servers running for 30 minutes

Last response: in Components
Share
July 6, 2006 3:41:46 PM

I am looking for a UPS that would keep 5 servers running for at least a half hour, after a power failure. If anyone has any experiance with UPS's and could give me some advise on which brands and models that would sustain that kind of load, it would be much apprecaited.
July 6, 2006 4:12:43 PM

Good luck with that. Depending on what kind of servers they are you might have trouble doing that with 5 separate UPSs let alone one.

-mcg
July 6, 2006 4:22:27 PM

I called HP and found out that the power supply wattage on all of our servers is only 325 max. There has to be some ups that would keep the servers running.
Related resources
July 6, 2006 4:40:09 PM

Quote:
I called HP and found out that the power supply wattage on all of our servers is only 325 max. There has to be some ups that would keep the servers running.


This is the beefiest ups that newegg sells and according to your figures from HP, it would handle it in theory.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1684...

5 servers seems like a lot of data to be dependant on a single ups. Normally I dedicate a ups for each server, workstations it shouldn't be a problem though.
July 6, 2006 4:45:21 PM

It may be cheaper to get 5 UPS's. And then each server can communicate with each UPS and shut itself down when battery power is getting too low. If you only have one UPS and the battery dies, all servers do a hard shutdown.

ADDED: Depends on your budget though so if you have the money there are high dollar solutions, as has been added below.
July 6, 2006 4:46:39 PM

Quote:
It will be cheaper to get 5 UPS's. Not only cheaper, but then each server can communicate with each UPS and shut itself down when battery power is getting too low. If you only have one UPS and the battery dies, all servers do a hard shutdown.


i never thought of that... thanks for the input
July 6, 2006 4:47:04 PM

No problem at all, I have UPS systems which could run 10+ servers for several hours.

http://www.metasystem.it/index.php/msy_ita_en/msyit/ups...

These are really great UPS's can be supplied with 1-8 power cards, and as many battery boxes as you like. Prices are not bad, but if you negotiate you should be able to get a sizable discount.
July 6, 2006 4:52:12 PM

Quote:
No problem at all, I have UPS systems which could run 10+ servers for several hours.

http://www.metasystem.it/index.php/msy_ita_en/msyit/ups...

These are really great UPS's can be supplied with 1-8 power cards, and as many battery boxes as you like. Prices are not bad, but if you negotiate you should be able to get a sizable discount.


that looks perfect... we are having some massive growth in our company and that seems like it has room for improvement. For instance if we get two new servers would that cover all five of the last and the two new ones?
July 6, 2006 5:00:38 PM

If you buy one with the appropriate battery and power handling. I believe it will be cheaper than 5+ good quality UPS systems, as there is less 'boxes' to buy.

Optional extras include a network interface, and remote shutdown software, so as long as you have the server's network switch gear on the UPS as well, all the attached servers can monitor the system's batterys and execute a controlled shutdown before the UPS power expires.
July 6, 2006 5:01:57 PM

Is there a way for one UPS to talk to many servers? Over a USB hub?

I have 2 servers per UPS and would like them to power down properly when the power goes out. In the past we have lost power 5 times in 8 months.

I have 1600VA UPS's running two servers for about 30 minutes, each server has dual cores or dual CPU and 460 or 550watt power supply.
July 6, 2006 5:17:31 PM

I think that's what he means with the remote software. Check if your UPS supports any such feature. Typically, the servers are connected via a cable [serial or UPS] but then some of the higher end UPS's might have a network interface with appropriate software, etc.
July 6, 2006 6:01:13 PM

Quote:
If you buy one with the appropriate battery and power handling. I believe it will be cheaper than 5+ good quality UPS systems, as there is less 'boxes' to buy.

Optional extras include a network interface, and remote shutdown software, so as long as you have the server's network switch gear on the UPS as well, all the attached servers can monitor the system's batterys and execute a controlled shutdown before the UPS power expires.


What brands of UPS would you recommend. So far I've looked at Meta system their Double Cabinet HF series and they look to be perfect but do you have any other suggestions? Does the remote shutdown software and network interface come with the product? Thanks again for your help!
July 6, 2006 8:33:33 PM

i've had 1 USP is my life. it was made by APC. it was decent. i never found a use for it tho.
July 6, 2006 9:16:45 PM

I'm using an APC SU2200XLRM unit (Smart-UPS, 2200VA output power, rack mount), with 1 extra battery pack (also rack mount), and the UPS Network Management card.

This setup is enabling me to run 7 servers (6 rack mount, 1 tower), 1 router & 5 switches for about 25 minutes after complete power failure. The network management card allows all servers to query the UPS as to it's status, and initiate graceful shutdown when batteries are depleted. The card connects to your network via ethernet, and has it's own built-in web server so you can configure the UPS and see it's status. It's also queryable via SNMP if you want to monitor it using something like HP OpenView, MRTG, or a host of other monitoring apps that use SNMP.

If you have more servers and need to supply more watts, go up to a SU3000XLRM. If you want more run time, add battery packs. If you're planning on adding more racks in the future, you can go to one of APC's rack solutions where one UPS can supply more than one rack.

(No, I don't work for APC. But APC's stuff works for me. 8) )
July 6, 2006 9:27:43 PM

What is the price tag on these bigger UPS systems, just out of curiosity? [Yeah, I know, I should use google :) 
July 6, 2006 10:02:35 PM

Quote:
What is the price tag on these bigger UPS systems, just out of curiosity? [Yeah, I know, I should use google :) 


SUA2200RMXL3U (Main rack-mount power unit, 2200VA), $1100.00
SUA48RMXLBP3U (Extra battery pack), $600
AP9617 (Basic Network management card), $225

Be aware that shipping cost on those units will total about $300 as well because they're made of lead. (Literally, :lol:  ).
July 6, 2006 10:11:40 PM

Quote:
What is the price tag on these bigger UPS systems, just out of curiosity? [Yeah, I know, I should use google :) 


SUA2200RMXL3U (Main rack-mount power unit, 2200VA), $1100.00
SUA48RMXLBP3U (Extra battery pack), $600
AP9617 (Basic Network management card), $225

Be aware that shipping cost on those units will total about $300 as well because they're made of lead. (Literally, :lol:  ).


yeh, very heavy little things.
July 6, 2006 11:03:25 PM

Not as expensive as I expected, to be honest. And, yeah, I just replaced all the batteries in my single UPS's so I know about shipping. 8O
July 6, 2006 11:30:26 PM

If you are going to get a UPS do your self a favour and make sure you get an inline/online UPS. That is get one that does not 'switch' to battery backup. A proper inline UPS inverts to 12V runs through the battery and then back to 240V (or 110V in the US) this plus a whole shebang of other circuitry creats proper voltage regulation and protects you from 9 out of 10 electrical issues that cause problems with electrical equipment. (the 10th is lightning and NOTHING will protect you from a direct strike - no matter what anyone tells you, lightning can and will destroy anything it comes into contact with, it does not care if you have a 'lightning protector' it will jump the kind of gaps those devices create to attempt to protect your equipment. the only true protection against lightning is to unplug!)

BUT that is no excuse for not having a proper UPS. A proper inline UPS will provide the kind of voltage regulation and filtration that is imperative to longevity of your equipment.

I personally use inline UPS's. They usually will tell you their input and output voltages. In my area voltage regularily fluctuates 10-20V. The output that the UPS stays 100% steady.

Cheers,
Scar
!