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2 questions, recovery CD and System Restore.

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October 1, 2004 2:09:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a repair
from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged system
files?

2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup routine
but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a full
format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove this
option?

--

Kenny
October 1, 2004 2:09:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

A recovery CD will only do a full re-install. You have to purchaase the
retail version to do a repair install.

"Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:o eKpNEzpEHA.536@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
> repair
> from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
> system
> files?
>
> 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
> routine
> but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a
> full
> format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove
> this
> option?
>
> --
>
> Kenny
>
>
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 2:09:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:

> 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a repair
> from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged system
> files?
>
> 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup routine
> but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a full
> format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove this
> option?

1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are found to
be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some registry
values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an upgrade
install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware and
installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
updates for the operating system.

2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore the
system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
(factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).

A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If provided
at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
differently than the one on the retail CD.

Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply) to
their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Related resources
October 1, 2004 3:43:40 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions can I
use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy so
that he can do it himself?

--

Kenny


"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:utazbVzpEHA.1272@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:
>
> > 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
repair
> > from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
system
> > files?
> >
> > 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
routine
> > but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a
full
> > format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove
this
> > option?
>
> 1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are found
to
> be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
> changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some registry
> values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an upgrade
> install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware and
> installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
> updates for the operating system.
>
> 2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
> system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore the
> system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
> (factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
>
> A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If provided
> at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
> differently than the one on the retail CD.
>
> Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply) to
> their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
> finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 3:43:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

No, because you will be asked for the CD and would need to use your key for
this purpose. You then would not be able to activate your copy on your
system because it will appear activated on another system and this assumes
it would even work as setup might reject your key if you try to use it for a
repair install on his system.

--
Michael Solomon MS-MVP
Windows Shell/User
Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/

"Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:u3Qz54zpEHA.516@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions can
> I
> use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy
> so
> that he can do it himself?
>
> --
>
> Kenny
>
>
> "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
> news:utazbVzpEHA.1272@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:
>>
>> > 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
> repair
>> > from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
> system
>> > files?
>> >
>> > 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
> routine
>> > but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a
> full
>> > format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove
> this
>> > option?
>>
>> 1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are found
> to
>> be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
>> changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some registry
>> values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an
>> upgrade
>> install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware and
>> installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
>> updates for the operating system.
>>
>> 2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
>> system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore
>> the
>> system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
>> (factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
>>
>> A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If provided
>> at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
>> differently than the one on the retail CD.
>>
>> Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply) to
>> their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
>> finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.
>>
>> --
>> Sharon F
>> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
>
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 4:21:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Where is your friend's cd?

"Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:u3Qz54zpEHA.516@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions can
> I
> use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy
> so
> that he can do it himself?
>
> --
>
> Kenny
>
>
> "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
> news:utazbVzpEHA.1272@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:
>>
>> > 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
> repair
>> > from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
> system
>> > files?
>> >
>> > 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
> routine
>> > but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a
> full
>> > format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove
> this
>> > option?
>>
>> 1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are found
> to
>> be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
>> changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some registry
>> values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an
>> upgrade
>> install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware and
>> installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
>> updates for the operating system.
>>
>> 2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
>> system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore
>> the
>> system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
>> (factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
>>
>> A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If provided
>> at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
>> differently than the one on the retail CD.
>>
>> Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply) to
>> their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
>> finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.
>>
>> --
>> Sharon F
>> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
>
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 10:49:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

It isn't hard to understand why OEMs so often choose this
option. Their target market is people who want to use the
computer and don't have the inclination to fix or modify
it. When the customer calls tech support, the mission is
so much simpler: rule out obvious hardware problems, then
have them run the restore disk to take the software to a
known state. We tinkerers (and professionals) are more
willing to hack the brush, but there are many times we
opt for format/reinstall, too.

My daughter's fiancee had an HP Pavilion and practiced
unsafe computing. In situations like that, restore disks
are pretty handy!

Mike

>-----Original Message-----
<big snip>
>2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore
the operating
>system if it should become damaged. Many opt for
programs that restore the
>system to the same state that existed when the system
was delivered
>(factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
>
<snip>
>Sharon F
>MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
>.
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 11:39:29 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

"Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:u3Qz54zpEHA.516@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions can
> I
> use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy
> so
> that he can do it himself?
>

Kenny,

You may not copy and give your retail copy to your friend for any purpose.
Your friend has an OEM license for Windows XP and your have a retail one.
They are different.
If you friend wants a regular Windows XP CD he/she should contact the OEM of
their PC and request one. Note however the OEM is not obliged to provide
one free or at cost as they have fulfilled their requirements to provide a
method of restoring the device to as shipped from the factory via the
destructive restore they seem to have chosen.


--

Regards,

Mike
--
Mike Brannigan [Microsoft]

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no
rights

Please note I cannot respond to e-mailed questions, please use these
newsgroups

"Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
news:u3Qz54zpEHA.516@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions can
> I
> use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy
> so
> that he can do it himself?
>
> --
>
> Kenny
>
>
> "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
> news:utazbVzpEHA.1272@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:
>>
>> > 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
> repair
>> > from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
> system
>> > files?
>> >
>> > 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
> routine
>> > but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to a
> full
>> > format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove
> this
>> > option?
>>
>> 1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are found
> to
>> be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
>> changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some registry
>> values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an
>> upgrade
>> install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware and
>> installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
>> updates for the operating system.
>>
>> 2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
>> system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore
>> the
>> system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
>> (factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
>>
>> A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If provided
>> at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
>> differently than the one on the retail CD.
>>
>> Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply) to
>> their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
>> finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.
>>
>> --
>> Sharon F
>> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
>
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 4:19:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 06:49:19 -0700, Michael Pardee wrote:

> It isn't hard to understand why OEMs so often choose this
> option. Their target market is people who want to use the
> computer and don't have the inclination to fix or modify
> it. When the customer calls tech support, the mission is
> so much simpler: rule out obvious hardware problems, then
> have them run the restore disk to take the software to a
> known state. We tinkerers (and professionals) are more
> willing to hack the brush, but there are many times we
> opt for format/reinstall, too.
>
> My daughter's fiancee had an HP Pavilion and practiced
> unsafe computing. In situations like that, restore disks
> are pretty handy!
>
I agree with you to a point. Many users of the type that you describe are
thrilled with the quick fix approach but are devastated when they find
their personal data (family photos, term papers, etc) has been zapped right
along with the problems they so desperately wanted to be rid of. That's my
objection to this approach. There should be more regard and warning about
these things that *can't* be reinstalled/restored using the OEM media.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
October 1, 2004 6:02:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

He has a recovery CD which doesn't allow a Repair, goes straight to full
format and re-install which was my original question.

--

Kenny


"Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst@msn.com> wrote in message
news:unAGu73pEHA.3668@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Where is your friend's cd?
>
> "Kenny" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:u3Qz54zpEHA.516@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Thanks for the replies. Since both of us have legal paid for versions
can
> > I
> > use my full copy of XP to run a repair on his PC or even make him a copy
> > so
> > that he can do it himself?
> >
> > --
> >
> > Kenny
> >
> >
> > "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
> > news:utazbVzpEHA.1272@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> On Thu, 30 Sep 2004 22:09:07 +0100, Kenny wrote:
> >>
> >> > 1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
> > repair
> >> > from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
> > system
> >> > files?
> >> >
> >> > 2. Running a recovery CD for a friend it started the usual XP setup
> > routine
> >> > but didn't give me the option of doing a repair, it went straight to
a
> > full
> >> > format and re-install. Is this usual and why would the PC maker
remove
> > this
> >> > option?
> >>
> >> 1) SFC replaces a select set of operating system files if they are
found
> > to
> >> be the wrong version or damaged. XP's repair install goes a further in
> >> changes it may make to the operating system - files, resets some
registry
> >> values, and checks hardware enumerations. It is more similar to an
> >> upgrade
> >> install that would maintain personal data, already installed hardware
and
> >> installed programs. After a repair install it is necessary to reinstall
> >> updates for the operating system.
> >>
> >> 2) OEMs are required only to provide some way to restore the operating
> >> system if it should become damaged. Many opt for programs that restore
> >> the
> >> system to the same state that existed when the system was delivered
> >> (factory state - wipe and start over from ground zero).
> >>
> >> A handful will include other recovery options such as repair. If
provided
> >> at all, the repair options might be customized and could work a bit
> >> differently than the one on the retail CD.
> >>
> >> Since there is so much variance in what OEMs supply (or don't supply)
to
> >> their customers, the system's own documentation is the best source for
> >> finding out what the restore/recovery options are and how they work.
> >>
> >> --
> >> Sharon F
> >> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 6:02:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 14:02:44 +0100, Kenny wrote:

> He has a recovery CD which doesn't allow a Repair, goes straight to full
> format and re-install which was my original question.

Maintaining a system with OEM supplied media can be a challenge. Examine
closely what is offered by the friend's OEM. There may be options available
that are not very obvious. For example, one OEM (HP/Compaq), adds a rather
unique repair option that is accessed by pressing a Function key during
boot.

Imaging a working system is another alternative for folks stuck with
limited OEM options. Instead of restoring the factory image, restore the
image created by the user. Keep several images on hand from various dates
to stay current with the system's updates and software added after purchase
of the system.

Example: I usually keep a "fresh install" image and a second that is a
fresh install plus my most often used apps. Two more images are maintained
on a weekly basis: current image and previous current image. This gives me
four images to choose from when/if disaster recovery is necessary.

If the setup is not too terribly complex, a decent backup program is
another route: reinstall operating system and apps from provided media.
Then restore data.

Another option: purchase a retail copy of XP. Remove everything installed
by the OEM and use the new copy to setup the system. You gain recovery
options and a bit more control for managing the system but there are
definite pitfalls to taking this route. One could run into difficulty
installing drivers for OEM specific hardware and may lose out on extra
software supplied with the system that won't install unless the system is
setup 100% with the OEM media.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
October 1, 2004 10:47:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

back to the original question, could the poster run sfc from his copy of XP
on his friend's computer?

"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:%23kOn$q9pEHA.868@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 06:49:19 -0700, Michael Pardee wrote:
>
>> It isn't hard to understand why OEMs so often choose this
>> option. Their target market is people who want to use the
>> computer and don't have the inclination to fix or modify
>> it. When the customer calls tech support, the mission is
>> so much simpler: rule out obvious hardware problems, then
>> have them run the restore disk to take the software to a
>> known state. We tinkerers (and professionals) are more
>> willing to hack the brush, but there are many times we
>> opt for format/reinstall, too.
>>
>> My daughter's fiancee had an HP Pavilion and practiced
>> unsafe computing. In situations like that, restore disks
>> are pretty handy!
>>
> I agree with you to a point. Many users of the type that you describe are
> thrilled with the quick fix approach but are devastated when they find
> their personal data (family photos, term papers, etc) has been zapped
> right
> along with the problems they so desperately wanted to be rid of. That's my
> objection to this approach. There should be more regard and warning about
> these things that *can't* be reinstalled/restored using the OEM media.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 4:25:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 18:47:06 -0600, Colin Barnhorst wrote:

> back to the original question, could the poster run sfc from his copy of XP
> on his friend's computer?

I don't think that was part of the original question. They asked about
running a recovery or repair install using their CD.

SFC uses files stored locally and on the XP CD as a source for fresh file
copies. An OEM disk is a potential problem as it may not have the needed
files in the form or location expected by SFC.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 4:58:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

No, he asked two, numbered questions, and the first was:

"1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a repair
from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged system
files?"

So my thought was that the poster might have a an XP cd and his friend only
a recovery disk. The repair install would require the key but the sfc would
not. sfc is less drastic than doing a recovery (unless the manufacturer
provides a sophisticated recovery program, of course).

"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:uQhWKBEqEHA.1960@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 18:47:06 -0600, Colin Barnhorst wrote:
>
>> back to the original question, could the poster run sfc from his copy of
>> XP
>> on his friend's computer?
>
> I don't think that was part of the original question. They asked about
> running a recovery or repair install using their CD.
>
> SFC uses files stored locally and on the XP CD as a source for fresh file
> copies. An OEM disk is a potential problem as it may not have the needed
> files in the form or location expected by SFC.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 4:11:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 00:58:45 -0600, Colin Barnhorst wrote:

> "1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a repair
> from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged system
> files?"
>
> So my thought was that the poster might have a an XP cd and his friend only
> a recovery disk. The repair install would require the key but the sfc would
> not. sfc is less drastic than doing a recovery (unless the manufacturer
> provides a sophisticated recovery program, of course).

Colin, you're free to interpret that second question however you want to. I
took it literally and addressed this part:

> Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove this
> option?

I also tried to give info in my last post about what you were asking: SFC
workings in relation with an OEM CD (it may or may not work, depends on the
CD) vs using a "regular" XP CD in conjunction with SFC. To expand a bit,
in theory - it should work BUT there's some risk using the friend's CD
instead. Some standard XP files may have been replaced with OEM specific
files.

Restating:

When a system is in trouble and the repair avenues supplied on a particular
setup aren't working, you run restore or you enter "what if" land.
Depending on level of expertise, one might opt to back up data and
experiment with other alternatives.

There's always the fall back of using the OEM's recovery program but you
have to be willing to go that path if the experiments should fail and
should prepare for it before starting those experiments.

I suspect that if either you or I faced this situation, we would roll up
our shirt sleeves and try many repair options (provided and experimental)
before succumbing to the "one size fits all" solution of restoring the
system to factory settings.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 5:04:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks, Sharon. The poster's question 1 raised a question for me that I had
not considered concerning sfc.

"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:uRT1ULKqEHA.3744@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 00:58:45 -0600, Colin Barnhorst wrote:
>
>> "1. What's the difference between running sfc /scannow and running a
>> repair
>> from XP CD, don't they both check for and replace misssing or damaged
>> system
>> files?"
>>
>> So my thought was that the poster might have a an XP cd and his friend
>> only
>> a recovery disk. The repair install would require the key but the sfc
>> would
>> not. sfc is less drastic than doing a recovery (unless the manufacturer
>> provides a sophisticated recovery program, of course).
>
> Colin, you're free to interpret that second question however you want to.
> I
> took it literally and addressed this part:
>
>> Is this usual and why would the PC maker remove this
>> option?
>
> I also tried to give info in my last post about what you were asking: SFC
> workings in relation with an OEM CD (it may or may not work, depends on
> the
> CD) vs using a "regular" XP CD in conjunction with SFC. To expand a bit,
> in theory - it should work BUT there's some risk using the friend's CD
> instead. Some standard XP files may have been replaced with OEM specific
> files.
>
> Restating:
>
> When a system is in trouble and the repair avenues supplied on a
> particular
> setup aren't working, you run restore or you enter "what if" land.
> Depending on level of expertise, one might opt to back up data and
> experiment with other alternatives.
>
> There's always the fall back of using the OEM's recovery program but you
> have to be willing to go that path if the experiments should fail and
> should prepare for it before starting those experiments.
>
> I suspect that if either you or I faced this situation, we would roll up
> our shirt sleeves and try many repair options (provided and experimental)
> before succumbing to the "one size fits all" solution of restoring the
> system to factory settings.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 6:23:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 13:04:46 -0600, Colin Barnhorst wrote:

> Thanks, Sharon. The poster's question 1 raised a question for me that I had
> not considered concerning sfc.

You're welcome, Colin and it's a good question. One that I suspect can only
be answered on a case by case basis -or rather OEM recovery by OEM recovery
CD basis :)  .

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
!