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New 805D build : advice sought

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July 7, 2006 2:05:59 PM

Hi, my first attempt at a new build......already got a whopping headache getting to the spec stage!!!!! Anyway, below is my stab at an affordable system that I can overclock if needbe. I'll not be doing any serious gaming on the system, it'll mainly be a media entertainment centre. Any advice, comments or suggestions will be much appreciated. ( My estimated costs are £400 ish).

CPU: Intel Pentium D 805 2.66 GHz (Dual Core)
Mobo: ASRock 775Twins-HDTV (Socket 775)
RAM : Corsair 1gb DDR2 Value Select (2x512 MB) Clock Speed 553Hz (or may go for 667Hz pack for £2more)
HDD : 1 x Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 (320Gb) SATA II 16mb cache
1 x Seagate Barracuda 7200.07 (120Gb) Ultra ATA/100 (own this already)
DVD : Liteon SOHW-1683S DVD burner
Case : Antec Sonata II with 450W PSU
Floppy : probably Sony
Cooler : Upgrade CPU cooler to Zalman CNPS 9500

Thanks in anticipation
Colin
PS does anyone know if the Zalman cooler will install ok given the mobo and cpu above???

More about : 805d build advice sought

July 7, 2006 4:04:20 PM

Get the 667MHz for 2 Pounds more. Hmm media and gaming, eh? You'll something called a video card! A good and cheap video card is the 7600GT, look for an eVGA one with high clock and memory speeds.
July 7, 2006 4:25:52 PM

The PD805 is a waste of time and money even with its overclocking potential if you got alittle more to spend get the Pentium D 930
Evga 7600Gt
Related resources
July 7, 2006 4:45:13 PM

Well, you're building a budget system, so I'm guessing you won't get a ton of responses. People seem to like to flock to the more expensive systems for the "ohh-ahh" factor. I'll throw my thoughts in however.

It appears as though you're planning on using the integrated ATI graphics, so you're statement about not doing a lot of gaming is very accurate. You won't be able to do much with integrated graphics to be very honest. I would recommend getting a discrete video card if you can afford the extra expense. It doesn't have to be anything spectacular to beat what's on the motherboard. Get an ATI 1600 or Nvidia 6600 series if you can swing the cash.
Also go with the 667 IF the latency timings are equal to the 533 or better. Increased clock speed with slower latency timings = no gain.

To be honest however, a lot of people will tell you to wait a couple of weeks when Conroe is available. Even if you decide not to buy a new Conroe chip, prices for existing Intel (and even AMD) chips are expected to drop at that time. It will save you some money to get a better video card solution OR you can upgrade to a faster CPU for the same money. Win-win, no? :)  I don't always recommend waiting for the next big thing (since there is always a new big thing), but this one is coming very soon and you'll benefit from it.
July 7, 2006 4:49:14 PM

Here's some advice: Wait for Conroe and the AM2 price drops. The 805D is only good as a space heater. If you just can't wait 2 weeks, the go with the D 930, as other people have suggested.
July 7, 2006 5:24:27 PM

AAAGGGEEWWWW (not another noob building an 805).

Why oh WHY do you want to try copying an article about overclocking a POS processor as your first build? It's like trying to build a V6 engine and then turbo charge it when you don't know shit about a lawn mower engine.

For god sakes buy a Dell (gaw thought I'd never say that).
July 7, 2006 6:30:13 PM

So, that's pretty useless. You came here to be a jackass for the sake of being a jackass? Either help the poor guy or go to one of Baron Matrix's threads to flame away. That's your kind of thread anyhow. :o 
July 7, 2006 7:05:27 PM

I'd dump the Corsair Value Select. Recently, a number of the high-end memory makers have come out with "value" brands that are sometimes (as in the case of Corsair) just routes to dump substandard chips on an unsuspecting public for a modest discount. Especially for 2x 1GB sets, Corsair Value Selects have a very high failure rate, and even the "good" modules are only rated for use at higher-than-standard voltage levels.
You don't want to be plagued with intermittent errors and lockups that turn out to be due to substandard memory. Especially on a first build, shell out the extra 20% for good-quality memory. Seems like almost every week, zipzoomfly, Newegg, or similar vendors are running specials or rebate offers on top-quality memory, like the XMS line, the Ballistix line, etc.
Hint: besides looking at price, speed, and latency, always look up the voltage the manufacturer specifies for the memory module. If it's higher than standard, then you know they're pushing the limit.
July 7, 2006 7:08:34 PM

My advice would be to get the 805D, BUT get a conroe compatible motherboard, then you can upgrade later to a conroe after the prices have come down, and have a little play with the overclocking the 805D without ruining a decent CPU!

The new ASUS MB's make overclocking extremely easy, and the Zalman will let you take it up to about 3.6GHz. I've got a 805D myself, only clocked to 3.2 though but just using the stock cooler, and it runs a treat. For £70 it's a bargain, but like the guys say, the minute conroe comes it it'll be even cheaper! And it's only weeks away!!!

:D 

PS You'll need a PSU...Don't get an Antec with an ASUS MB.
July 7, 2006 7:26:42 PM

Excellent, many thanks for the responses...just what i wanted. Now for a bit of flesh on the bones....
I accept it's probably better to wait for the prices drops but why the Pentium D 930 in particular? What makes it so much better than the 805D?

Also, does Mr Waylander have a point (albeit a pretty vitriolic one)? Is building a system beyond your average Joe? I've upgraded my existing system over the years with memory, HHD's, etc but I've never built one from scratch. Am I likely to be out of my depth ?
If not, then whats the best online guide to follow??

Finally, why not the Antec case with an Asus mobo??

cheers
b14desman
July 7, 2006 7:29:58 PM

I don't see why everyone dislikes the 805 overclocking project. I followed what they did on the site and i have a stable 4.0 ghz with cooler master liquid cooling. Benchmarks proove its fast, so people can't even argue that fact.

The setup you have seems to be fine, but yes, you'll need a video card. Also I might recommend 2X160 gig hard drives in raid 0, as you will bed a significant performance increase for pretty well no price increase.
July 7, 2006 7:35:20 PM

Quote:
I don't see why everyone dislikes the 805 overclocking project. ...

It doesn't have the "bling" of using "bleeding edge" components, and runs the risk of letting in the low-budget riff-raff. :wink:
July 7, 2006 7:40:27 PM

Just for your information.... why don't you look at some of the other 400+ posts I've made before calling someone a jackass.

I've tried to help as much as possible for the last 6+ "I'm a noob and I'm trying to do what the technical wizards at THG (who also submerged a computer in vegetable oil and got it to work) did with this processor"

Just because you can doesn't mean you should and quite frankly most noobs don't have the ability to pull something like this off. Some might get lucky and have no problems but we all know how hard it can be and what kind of troubles that you run into on a normal build much less building something like this with the intention of overclocking to the point where the processor draws 150w by itself.

Besides, there are more posts than necessary on this topic, a simple search would probably have answered most of his questions.

In the end, if you are having this much trouble before even starting the build then you should think real hard about how much trouble you'll have later.

I'll be the first to say that building your own is better than buying pre-built but use some common sense, a $120 processor to run as fast as an FX60... hmmm that's probably going to take some work... am I really ready to do that on my first build?

Get a better processor and save your overclocking for later... for when your processor starts having trouble doing what you need. When there are processors available that can already do it at a reasonable cost WHY do you want to take the chance now?

Save money on the processor? Sure.... spend more on good overclocking memory, a beefier psu and definitely better hsf (if not water cooling) and you've made up the cost difference that would have gotten you that good processor to begin with. Not to mention the reduced life of an overclocked processor and voiding every warranty that you can think of.

I also have no problems with budget systems, getting an opteron (with a damn fine and stable overclocking ability) is a great idea (btw compare the # of posts with opteron troubles compared to 805 troubles and you'll see where I'm coming from).

BTW there is no problem with using an asus board in an antec case and psu.... I've built at least 6 with this combination.

You want good advise? Make sure you have at least 500w from a good maker (you'll need it), make sure you have a good case with excellent air flow, buy either a very good after market hsf or water cool your cpu (another added complication to a first build). Get damn good DDR2 memory from corsair, mushkin or ocz. Get ready to spend over 10 hours on finding the stable OC that you can get depending on your components.

Oh just so you know, I never tried overclocking until I was on my 4th build, that experience really helped when I needed to trouble shoot.
July 7, 2006 7:46:17 PM

Why does everyone make this project sound like rocket science? It doesn't take an IQ of 180 to figure this out. PC's are designed for easy assembly, and easy it is. Even rookies can do this. There is a step-by-step guide on the site that hosts this forum.
Plus if you have never assembled a PC before this project is a great way to learn, so long as you proceed step by step and take your time you can have a very fast computer for a ery affordable price.

Maybe I'm a "n00b", maybe I'm not, but either way I have a smoking fast 4.0ghz cpu that was a breeze to assemble. ;) 
July 7, 2006 8:01:31 PM

Quote:
...
Just because you can doesn't mean you should and quite frankly most noobs don't have the ability to pull something like this off. Some might get lucky and have no problems but we all know how hard it can be and what kind of troubles that you run into on a normal build much less building something like this with the intention of overclocking to the point where the processor draws 150w by itself.

Yes, but according to his post, the OP wasn't even planning on overclocking, at least initially.
Quote:

In the end, if you are having this much trouble before even starting the build then you should think real hard about how much trouble you'll have later.

It doesn't sound like he is having any trouble, just asking around.
Quote:

Save money on the processor? Sure.... spend more on good overclocking memory, a beefier psu and definitely better hsf (if not water cooling) and you've made up the cost difference that would have gotten you that good processor to begin with.

One of the nice aspects of overclocking the 805D is that you *don't* have to buy "overclocking" memory, since you're just running DDR2-667 or DDR2-800. My motherboard+550W PS+hsf cost was $150 total. A dual-core 3.6GHz processor runs around $550, or $430 more than my 805D. That's a lot of power supply/hsf money...
Quote:
Not to mention the reduced life of an overclocked processor and voiding every warranty that you can think of.
Good points. However, I've never had a processor die on me, so lack of warranty and reduced life seem less important to me. YMMV.

In the end, if everything goes bad and he fries a processor or motherboard, he's only out $100-150 anyway. Not bad as learning experiences go...
July 7, 2006 8:04:23 PM

I agree 100%
July 7, 2006 8:20:36 PM

Quote:
It doesn't sound like he is having any trouble, just asking around.


Please see his first post.

Quote:
Hi, my first attempt at a new build......already got a whopping headache getting to the spec stage!!!!!


Quote:
My motherboard+550W PS+hsf cost was $150 total.


Sorry to say but that doesn't sound like a very good psu, mb or hsf.

and quite frankly, you may not care if you blow your computer but he may and that was my point.

One other note... if you slap a rocket on a piece of sh!t.... it's still a piece of sh!t, just one that will probably explode sooner or later.
July 7, 2006 8:31:42 PM

Sorry, I meant don't use an Antec PSU(Power Supply Unit) with an ASUS motherboard...Some don't work.

Quote:
BTW there is no problem with using an asus board in an antec case and psu.... I've built at least 6 with this combination.


Waylander...do some research befor etelling noobs they work fine. The ASUS P5W DH doesn't work with the Antec NeoHe 550W, as I've just found out, and is confirmed by OC.co.uk. Try doing a goole on ASUS ANTEC PSU Problems and you'll find there's a number of posts out there confirming this.

There's alot of good PSU's out there, why risk it on your first build? When I booted my new build I didn't have a clue why it wouldn't boot...lights were on on the MB but it just wouldn't start...was it the PSU? Processor? Memory?...fortunatly I had a spare PSU that didn't fit the case but let me test at least that, and bingo...it all worked. According to OC.co.uk the ampage given to the CPU should be 3...but the Antec only gives 2, so the MB wont boot. They recommeded a TAGAN but I'm going for a Enermax Liberty 620 modular.
July 7, 2006 8:33:19 PM

Thanks, I know what a psu is... and yes I've built at least 6 antec psu with asus motherboard computers in the last 3 years... no problems what so ever.
July 7, 2006 8:47:43 PM

Quote:
...
My motherboard+550W PS+hsf cost was $150 total.


Sorry to say but that doesn't sound like a very good psu, mb or hsf.

The motherboard is only OK (it's an NI8 SLI), but the PS is an Ultra X2 Connect and the hsf is an Arctic Freezer 7 Pro; certainly more than plenty for 3.6GHz.
Quote:
and quite frankly, you may not care if you blow your computer but he may and that was my point.
I care, I just don't let it stop me from trying new things. Good point wrt the OP, though. Building your own system is not for the faint-hearted. Like modding a car, sometimes you have to "pay to play."
July 7, 2006 8:54:57 PM

I wrote...
Quote:
PS You'll need a PSU...Don't get an Antec with an ASUS MB.


b14desman wrote...
Quote:
Finally, why not the Antec case with an Asus mobo??


waylander....chill.... :D 
July 7, 2006 9:26:46 PM

Quote:
New Asus BIOS + updated Neo HE = no compatibility problem.


From antec support.


Quote:
BTW there is no problem with using an asus board in an antec case and psu.... I've built at least 6 with this combination.


Also, I can't imagine the number of ppl out there that have the sonata 2 w/ an asus motherboard. The neo he may have specific problems, which have been addressed, but there are other worse compatabilities that I've run accross and I don't say not to do it, just to be aware.

The entire x-fi incompatability with some nforce4 sli chipsets is one. I tried this myself and couldn't get it to work, some were able to fix it with a bios update.

BUT the two problems addressed above are cases in point with building a new system if you've never done it before, add overclocking to it and it's just more complicated than you need for a first build.
July 7, 2006 10:02:00 PM

Again, thanks for the interest. To put the record straight, I have an old system and just fancied the challenge of building a basic, affordable system....trying to keep the old grey matter from rusting (Waylander, this is humour... similar to my earlier quote about getting a headache).

My intention was to run it at 2.66GHz and maybe clock it to say 3.2 if I wanted another challenge.....(sometimes called masochism).

I confess I've nicked most of my ideas from the articles/posts on clocking a Pentium 805D, but hey we all have to start somewhere.

All the suggested components are relatively inexpensive so I'm not going to top myself if something breaks. .....even if it all fails it's not going to do much damage to the old bank balance is it!

I do recognise the potential difficulties of a first build, hence my post which by the way has provided lots of useful tips. I reckon I'll await the price drops and look at alternatives for boards and ram. I'll probably even investigate the 930D while I await the 24th July.

Cheers
b14desman
UTB
July 7, 2006 10:06:11 PM

Quote:
Just for your information.... why don't you look at some of the other 400+ posts I've made before calling someone a jackass.

I've tried to help as much as possible for the last 6+ "I'm a noob and I'm trying to do what the technical wizards at THG (who also submerged a computer in vegetable oil and got it to work) did with this processor"


It's true that I don't know much of what you've posted before. All I know is the guy who came from on-high to smite the lowlie noob in this thread sounds like a jackass. It's OK, I don't have to like your post do I? :D  Honestly though, if you don't like the posts from "noobs", why bother coming in and giving him grief? Just move on to something else. There's thousands of other posts that could benefit from your superior wisdom I'm sure. Let us other lowlifes answer his question so as not to bother your uberness. 8O That way, you are happier to not bring yourself to have to see such garbage and we are happier not to see you blast the guy for asking questions. Sounds like a win-win!
July 7, 2006 10:21:14 PM

I have a better idea...

why don't all the noobs that come on here do a search first so that they can find the answer to the question the first 5 times it was asked

and....

you shove all those smilies up where the sun don't shine? :lol: 

and considering that you've spent half of your post total whining at me, please don't get all pissy.
July 8, 2006 1:02:57 AM

Seeing as how you were the first to come in here and whine about the "noobs", you can obviously see that you're a jackass. BTW, anyone that uses the term "noob" so frequently is likely a "noob" or simply a jackass.
Now get out of this post where you don't belong, since you obviously don't know how to behave. You've got the internet swagger and bad behavior of someone that hides behind the anonymity the internet provides. Guaranteed you'd get a whipping IRL talking like you do to strangers about how they are "noobs" and shouldn't be building PCs (like its hard?) and how they should buy a Dell since they're obviously too dumb to build one.
It's sad I've had to waste half of my posts on you so far. Jackasses like yourself make forums lame for those of us who have to endure your sorry self. All the guy wanted was advice. Many of us obviously didn't have a problem providing it. If you don't want to waste your time with it, keep your rude comments to yourself and reply to the forums that aren't beneath you're super special uber gnarly talents. :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D  :D 
July 8, 2006 1:18:09 AM

Quote:
Excellent, many thanks for the responses...just what i wanted. Now for a bit of flesh on the bones....
I accept it's probably better to wait for the prices drops but why the Pentium D 930 in particular? What makes it so much better than the 805D?

Also, does Mr Waylander have a point (albeit a pretty vitriolic one)? Is building a system beyond your average Joe? I've upgraded my existing system over the years with memory, HHD's, etc but I've never built one from scratch. Am I likely to be out of my depth ?
If not, then whats the best online guide to follow??

Finally, why not the Antec case with an Asus mobo??

cheers
b14desman


People are recommending the 900 series chips since they are also cheap, but certainly superior to the 800 series. The 900 series chips are based upon the 65 nm process vs 90 nm on the 800s. That in part means it uses less energy and creates less heat as a result. The 900 series has 2 MB of L2 cache vs 1 MB for 800 series. There are other differences, but that's enough for now. I don't want to get long-winded on you.
Building a system is NOT beyond your average Joe. There are things I wouldn't recommend on the first build such as watercooling, but what you're talking about isn't really hard. You may have some trouble learning about the OC'ing process, but you'll pick it up just fine as long as you read up on the how-tos and ask the right questions here. (Regardless of what guys like Waylander say) Experience is the best teacher. Don't be afraid to build your own. Before you know it, you'll have made your first and want to start on your second. As soon as you have money that is.... 8O
July 8, 2006 1:23:37 AM

I think everyone can agree that searching is always a good idea. However, it is rarely necessary to be rude. The OP's post certainly didn't demand rudeness, so why doesn't everyone just chill. Remember, there could be children watching! :mrgreen:
!