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Deskjet 6540 printer and Photo cartridge C9369W

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Anonymous
May 5, 2005 7:27:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi,

I just purchased a Deskjet 6540 printer and this morning bought me a
Photo cartridge C9369W and a Grey Photo cartridge C9368A. I opened the
Photo cartridge ink and my first disappointment was that there was no
clip so that one could store the cartridge when not in use. I didn't
open the Grey one as yet.

I opened the printer and replaced the black with the photo cartridge.
The first thing I noticed was that the photo cartridge was considerably
shorter than the black. It ***seemed*** to fit snugly. Upon closing the
ink bay clip and the printer lid, the ink symbol on the front started
flashing. I went into the HP tool box and the photo cartridge ink was
not being recognised as being present.

Can anyone please help with a solution?

Thanks.

If this is being read by someone from HP: I still have ink holders
dating back from the 600c printers and have progressed to numerous HP
printers. I think that not bundling storage clips with photo cartridges
is really making your printers look cheap. Also if you design a printer
to hold such large black ink tubs, would it not have been nice for the
consumer to be able to stock photo cartridges in this size as well?
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 3:22:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Agreed, but I still think that since the 6540 does not have such a
feature they should provide a storage clip.

Besides, has any else had problems with the photo cartridge (or for
that matter the grey one).

Thanks.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 4:07:51 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

chribonn wrote:

>Hi,
>
>I just purchased a Deskjet 6540 printer and this morning bought me a
>Photo cartridge C9369W and a Grey Photo cartridge C9368A. I opened the
>Photo cartridge ink and my first disappointment was that there was no
>clip so that one could store the cartridge when not in use. I didn't
>open the Grey one as yet.
>
>

HP has a model in the 8000 series that allows you to use all 3 carts at
once so you do not have to change them.

>I opened the printer and replaced the black with the photo cartridge.
>The first thing I noticed was that the photo cartridge was considerably
>shorter than the black. It ***seemed*** to fit snugly. Upon closing the
>ink bay clip and the printer lid, the ink symbol on the front started
>flashing. I went into the HP tool box and the photo cartridge ink was
>not being recognised as being present.
>
>Can anyone please help with a solution?
>
>Thanks.
>
>If this is being read by someone from HP: I still have ink holders
>dating back from the 600c printers and have progressed to numerous HP
>printers. I think that not bundling storage clips with photo cartridges
>is really making your printers look cheap. Also if you design a printer
>to hold such large black ink tubs, would it not have been nice for the
>consumer to be able to stock photo cartridges in this size as well?
>
>
>
Related resources
May 6, 2005 1:23:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:


>
> HP has a model in the 8000 series that allows you to use all 3 carts at
> once so you do not have to change them.

In the future please refrain from answering post unless your answer has
something to do with the op's question, ok.
Frank
May 6, 2005 8:15:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

chribonn wrote:

>I opened the printer and replaced the black with the photo cartridge.
>The first thing I noticed was that the photo cartridge was considerably
>shorter than the black.

That's normal. The black cartridge that comes with the printer is a high
volume cartridge and is the largest one they offer.

> It ***seemed*** to fit snugly. Upon closing the
>ink bay clip and the printer lid, the ink symbol on the front started
>flashing. I went into the HP tool box and the photo cartridge ink was
>not being recognised as being present.
>
>Can anyone please help with a solution?

Make sure you put the photo cartridge in the proper slot. It should be
the right hand slot with the black lever. Make sure you push it all the
way forward.

If it's not all the way up to the contacts, the lever will not "grab it"
and secure it against the contacts when you snap it back down into
place.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 8:31:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>
>>
>> HP has a model in the 8000 series that allows you to use all 3 carts
>> at once so you do not have to change them.
>
>
> In the future please refrain from answering post unless your answer
> has something to do with the op's question, ok.
> Frank


It does Frankie Crankie
May 6, 2005 8:31:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> Frank wrote:
>
>> measekite wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>> HP has a model in the 8000 series that allows you to use all 3 carts
>>> at once so you do not have to change them.
>>
>>
>>
>> In the future please refrain from answering post unless your answer
>> has something to do with the op's question, ok.
>> Frank
>
>
>
> It does Frankie Crankie

Are you blind! DJ 8000 has nothing to do with the DJ 6540 posted by the op.
You're a real idiot.
Frank
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 11:34:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Frank wrote:
>>
>>> measekite wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> HP has a model in the 8000 series that allows you to use all 3
>>>> carts at once so you do not have to change them.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In the future please refrain from answering post unless your answer
>>> has something to do with the op's question, ok.
>>> Frank
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> It does Frankie Crankie
>
>
> Are you blind! DJ 8000 has nothing to do with the DJ 6540 posted by
> the op.
> You're a real idiot.
> Frank


Swallow and I do not mean the bird. Mooooooooooooooooooooo
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 11:49:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"chribonn" <chribonn@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1115332071.165751.280520@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Hi,
>
> I just purchased a Deskjet 6540 printer and this morning bought me a
> Photo cartridge C9369W and a Grey Photo cartridge C9368A. I opened the
> Photo cartridge ink and my first disappointment was that there was no
> clip so that one could store the cartridge when not in use. I didn't
> open the Grey one as yet.

Hmm.... I thought the humidor was included in the retail package for the photo
cartridge, in a compartment below the cartridge.

> I opened the printer and replaced the black with the photo cartridge.
> The first thing I noticed was that the photo cartridge was considerably
> shorter than the black. It ***seemed*** to fit snugly. Upon closing the
> ink bay clip and the printer lid, the ink symbol on the front started
> flashing. I went into the HP tool box and the photo cartridge ink was
> not being recognised as being present.

I would remove and then reseat the cartridge. If this does not correct the
problem contact HP or your dealer for a replacement cartridge.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
May 8, 2005 2:59:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

HP is trying to conjour something up; I have had the same identical
problem withthe Tri Colour Cartridge; the 344 (C9363E) works, yet the
printer refuses to work with the 97 (C9363W) which clearsly states on
the box that it should work with this model.

I wish HP would make their profits selling quality goods rather than
introducing such technology in their products.

There is a black that has this same market differentiation technology!

I tried to talk the support at HP but the people had no idea what they
were talking about (a lot of rethoric over and over again).

If anyone has any information on such activites please post.
Anonymous
May 8, 2005 9:35:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"chribonn" <chribonn@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1115575189.142205.121260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> HP is trying to conjour something up; I have had the same identical
> problem withthe Tri Colour Cartridge; the 344 (C9363E) works, yet the
> printer refuses to work with the 97 (C9363W) which clearsly states on
> the box that it should work with this model.
>
> If anyone has any information on such activites please post.

From the HP web page at
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...:
"Ink cartridge replacements vary by region. Contact the regional HP center for
the latest information. To ensure purchasing the correct replacement ink
cartridges for your printer, carefully check the part numbers on the label of
the old ink cartridges."

Printers sold in different regions use different cartridges. You can check the
cartridge in your printer, or check the "ordering information" in the toolbox
for the cartridges supported by your printer.

Regards,

Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 5:09:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> Printers sold in different regions use different cartridges. You can
check the
> cartridge in your printer, or check the "ordering information" in the
toolbox
> for the cartridges supported by your printer.

Any why would HP want to produce the same product for different regions
if not to price differenciate? Sell by producing better products
(better value for money, better cost of ownership, better quality...)
and not by charging depending on how much one can shark out from a
client.

For example, I have read that a new "feature" HP are introducing into
their inks is that you printer will stop working after it
electronically expires. In the past if the ink expired the print would
have been low quality and the owner would have simply changed the ink.
In my opinion, ripping a few ml of ink from each customer is a very low
method of increasing the bottom line. Besides why should I need HP to
protect me from expired ink when HP incorporates the print head into
the unit, make it disposable?

I am pretty sure people will, one they discover this trickery, react
accordingly.

Regards,
Chris
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 11:20:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"chribonn" <chribonn@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1115626142.372381.161550@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

> For example, I have read that a new "feature" HP are introducing into
> their inks is that you printer will stop working after it
> electronically expires. In the past if the ink expired the print would
> have been low quality and the owner would have simply changed the ink.
> In my opinion, ripping a few ml of ink from each customer is a very low
> method of increasing the bottom line. Besides why should I need HP to
> protect me from expired ink when HP incorporates the print head into
> the unit, make it disposable?

You are mistaken. HP has different types of printers. Most of the consumer
level machines use cartridges with printheads built into the cartridge. None
of these electronically expire the cartridges. Printers that have separate
printheads and ink supplies do check the age of the ink to prevent clogging the
printheads with ink that has become thick due to age. The typical expiration
for ink supplies in such a case is 4.5 years from date of manufacture, which
should not be an issue for the users these systems were designed to support.

- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
May 10, 2005 6:19:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

>From Computer Active 3rd to 16 Feb 2005

"HP IS 'region coding' new printers, making imported cartridges
incompatible with the devices. The cartridges have a chip coded with
the region, which is read by software in the printers. A mismatch means
the printer won't work. For example, a British user who buys a
printer in the US can't use British cartridges or vice versa. HP says
the move is a means to avoid currency fluctuations. "[Price]
volatility
can be confusing for customers, as they don't know what to expect
each time they go to the store. By introducing a regional approach we
can offer greater certainty." However, country coding is a trick
borrowed from the entertainment industry, which uses it on DVDs to stop
grey imports - where
people buy consumables at a cheaper price in other countries. Users
will still be able to use refilled
cartridges according to HP, as long as they match the printer's
region. But there will be a delay in getting these to market. "We
need to get enough cartridges, find ways to refill them and make sure
inks are
compatible. This takes time, so we may not see compatible refills for a
year or so,"
said Keith Moss, chairman of the UK Cartridge Remanufacturers'
Association.
The four regions are Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Americas and
the Far East. People who move between countries can contact HP to
arrange for the printer to be reset to the new region. "

My advice to consumers is that they stay away from HP printers. Make
profits off good products not by cheating customers. What I find so
ironic is that when it serves them right these companies talk about
globalisation yet do everything in their power to hinder it when it
does not work exclusivly in their favour.
Anonymous
May 10, 2005 6:32:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

>You are mistaken. ... None of these electronically expire the
cartridges.

No, then have a look at
http://www.pro-networks.org/forum/about49487.html
and http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/letters/hpPrinter...
and http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20050222/1220232_F.sht...
and should I continue.

Bob, as you mention, in HP printer the ink has an integrated head so
there is no justification for introducing such mechanisms other than to
rip customers off.

Chris
Anonymous
May 11, 2005 9:58:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

There may be another purpose behind this, and it doesn't bode well either.

The EU has passed laws regarding cartridges which will require print
cartridges to be refillable, I believe by 2006. This was legislated
because of the tremendous number of printer cartridges being discarded
and ending up in land fills. Not only is this horribly wasteful, but
ink cartridges are not only not reasonably recyclable, but the inks are
considered toxic materials dangerous, to the watershed.

In order to fulfill the legislation, HP is going to probably have to
redesign their European cartridges to make them more easily refillable.

North America, and other regions of the world haven't quite been as
willing to force this type of legislation (idiots!)

My suspicions are that HP was worried that if they started to produce a
easy-refill cartridge for Europe, dealers and individuals in other
countries, interested in having a more easily refillable cartridge would
begin importing from Europe. Hence, there goes HP's ink revenues
globally, rather than just in Europe. It would have proven to be an
interesting experiment had HP left things alone. I'm guessing the
European cartridges are going to have a price premium put on them. It
would have been interesting to see how much more non-European would be
willing to pay to have a cartridge which was easier to fill.

I also wonder if the legislation makes any statements about how durable
the cartridges with an integrated head need to be... as in how many
times they must the refillable before they fail. It is possible that
the European versions may have to be more durable, also.

All I can say, is shame on HP. I don't believe this is the type of
games either the Hewlett or Packard founders would have encouraged.


Art



chribonn wrote:

>>From Computer Active 3rd to 16 Feb 2005
>
> "HP IS 'region coding' new printers, making imported cartridges
> incompatible with the devices. The cartridges have a chip coded with
> the region, which is read by software in the printers. A mismatch means
> the printer won't work. For example, a British user who buys a
> printer in the US can't use British cartridges or vice versa. HP says
> the move is a means to avoid currency fluctuations. "[Price]
> volatility
> can be confusing for customers, as they don't know what to expect
> each time they go to the store. By introducing a regional approach we
> can offer greater certainty." However, country coding is a trick
> borrowed from the entertainment industry, which uses it on DVDs to stop
> grey imports - where
> people buy consumables at a cheaper price in other countries. Users
> will still be able to use refilled
> cartridges according to HP, as long as they match the printer's
> region. But there will be a delay in getting these to market. "We
> need to get enough cartridges, find ways to refill them and make sure
> inks are
> compatible. This takes time, so we may not see compatible refills for a
> year or so,"
> said Keith Moss, chairman of the UK Cartridge Remanufacturers'
> Association.
> The four regions are Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Americas and
> the Far East. People who move between countries can contact HP to
> arrange for the printer to be reset to the new region. "
>
> My advice to consumers is that they stay away from HP printers. Make
> profits off good products not by cheating customers. What I find so
> ironic is that when it serves them right these companies talk about
> globalisation yet do everything in their power to hinder it when it
> does not work exclusivly in their favour.
>
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:27:43 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"chribonn" <chribonn@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1115717579.928805.265870@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> >You are mistaken. ... None of these electronically expire the
> cartridges.
>
> No, then have a look at
> http://www.pro-networks.org/forum/about49487.html

Although the printer does indicate low on ink status it (unlike other
manufacturers) does not refuse to print. As I mentioned earlier, the low on
ink message is designed to let users know they are getting low on ink and may
want to arrange to have another ink supply available for when they actually run
out.

> and http://www.land.netonecom.net/tlp/ref/letters/hpPrinter...

This user is discussing the D125X which has separate ink and printheads. This
is a different system than the printers with integrated printheads and has
different requirements to keep the printheads healthy.

> and http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20050222/1220232_F.sht...
> and should I continue.

Again, the user is confused between the integrated printhead models (which do
not have any enforced ink expiration dates) and the separate ink and printhead
designs (which may check ink age to prevent head clogging).

> Bob, as you mention, in HP printer the ink has an integrated head so
> there is no justification for introducing such mechanisms other than to
> rip customers off.

You are mistaken. HP has both integrated printheads designs and those with
separate printheads. My previous comments were related to the integrated
printhead designs, and none of these enforce an expiration on the cartridges.
The separate ink and printhead designs have different design constraints.

Once again - on the integrated printhead designs (which includes all DeskJet,
Photosmart and PSC units, many of the All-in-one and none of the Business
Inkjet models) do not refuse to print because the user is running low on ink or
because an expiration date has been reached.

There is much misconception and many opinions are being presented as fact that
have no such basis. I have been involved in the design of nearly all the
integrated printhead designs since 1994 and can assure you that what I say
above is correct.

Regards,
Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP

>
> Chris
>
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:32:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
news:IIrge.1319025$6l.516614@pd7tw2no...

[wild speculation snipped]

> All I can say, is shame on HP. I don't believe this is the type of games
> either the Hewlett or Packard founders would have encouraged.

You are mistaken on several counts and much of the above is not based on fact.
I would have expected a more reasoned analysis from you Art, I know you can do
better.

- Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 11:01:55 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Bob,

In my opinion, defending one's employer is a very noble thing to do
(especially since it is one's employer who sends the money).

Below are two pairs of links; go to each and read the contents; you may
have access to these part numbers; read the pages; you would think that
other than one ending in W and the other ending in E there is nothing
different.

Open each pair up; again you will not notice anything visually
different inside and the ink is basically identical.

So why does one work with certain printers while the other does not?

So why does one tell me that on the back of the box that this is for EU
and half a dozen other European countries and the other does not?

So why does one cost more than the other?

I would be more than happy to post a scan of the back of the EU pack
with the countries clearly listed.

I have not grudge with HP producing a European version of a US ink, but
selling me the idea that I am paying more (in a world connected thanks
to the internet) for my own good is really something.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...

Chris

PS: If you need that scan let me know.
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 11:03:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Bob,

In my opinion, defending one's employer is a very noble thing to do
(especially since it is one's employer who sends the money).

Below are two pairs of links; go to each and read the contents; you may
have access to these part numbers; read the pages; you would think that
other than one ending in W and the other ending in E there is nothing
different.

Open each pair up; again you will not notice anything visually
different inside and the ink is basically identical.

So why does one work with certain printers while the other does not?

So why does one tell me that on the back of the box that this is for EU
and half a dozen other European countries and the other does not?

So why does one cost more than the other?

I would be more than happy to post a scan of the back of the EU pack
with the countries clearly listed.

I have not grudge with HP producing a European version of a US ink, but
selling me the idea that I am paying more (in a world connected thanks
to the internet) for my own good is really something.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...

Chris

PS: If you need that scan let me know.
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 11:07:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hi Bob,

In my opinion, defending one's employer is a very noble thing to do
(especially since it is one's employer who sends the money).

Below are two pairs of links; go to each and read the contents; you may
have access to these part numbers; read the pages; you would think that
other than one ending in W and the other ending in E there is nothing
different.

Open each pair up; again you will not notice anything visually
different inside and the ink is basically identical.

So why does one work with certain printers while the other does not?

So why does one tell me that on the back of the box that this is for EU
and half a dozen other European countries and the other does not?

So why does one cost more than the other?

I would be more than happy to post a scan of the back of the EU pack
with the countries clearly listed.

I have not grudge with HP producing a European version of a US ink, but
selling me the idea that I am paying more (in a world connected thanks
to the internet) for my own good is really something.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=e...

Chris

PS: If you need that scan let me know.
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 6:42:54 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Well Bob, I'm open to more "reasoned speculation", but mine makes a heck
of a lot of sense.

I can think of a few reasons where regionalization of cartridges might
allow for certain minor advantages in printing, such as if certain
locales have higher humidity than others, or other environmental issues,
or perhaps a color bias could be added for cultural purposes, as is done
with film, although that could be handled more easily in drivers. I
could even see some reasons for doing so for a competitive advantage for
certain features that may wish to be tested in certain markets, but none
of those would require that the printers only work specifically with
certain cartridges, locking out others.

Whenever a corporation claims they are trying to "protect us" from
ourselves by building in "safeguards" so we do not do certain things
with their products, I get very skeptical.

Epson told me they chipped their ink cartridges to protect the consumer
from counterfeit ink cartridges and so the printer could keep track of
cartridge ink volumes remaining if the unit was removed from the printer
and then replaced later on. Besides that they have been unsuccessful in
dealing with counterfeits, even with the chip, and indeed you can have
the cartridge hold the approximate ink volume left within it for later
use, there were absolutely other motives for the design.

I stated in my posting what my suspicions are, not facts, but
suspicions. They still are. I find the timing rather suspect in terms
of this decision and the EU legislation. I am quite willing to be
proven wrong, but unless some other legitimate and reasonable
explanations are provided, I'm left to speculate. So, since I
apparently am not capable in this case of "more reasoned analysis" I
would like to know what HP's reasons are to regionalize their cartridges
such that they will only work with printers made for sale in the same
regions.

Art





> "Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
> news:IIrge.1319025$6l.516614@pd7tw2no...
>
> There may be another purpose behind this, and it doesn't bode well either.
>
> The EU has passed laws regarding cartridges which will require print
cartridges to be refillable, I believe by 2006. This was legislated
because
of the tremendous number of printer cartridges being discarded and ending
up in land fills. Not only is this horribly wasteful, but ink cartridges
are not only not reasonably recyclable, but the inks are considered toxic
materials dangerous, to the watershed.
>
> In order to fulfill the legislation, HP is going to probably have to
redesign their European cartridges to make them more easily refillable.
>
> North America, and other regions of the world haven't quite been as
willing to force this type of legislation (idiots!)
>
> My suspicions are that HP was worried that if they started to produce
a easy-refill cartridge for Europe, dealers and individuals in other
countries, interested in having a more easily refillable cartridge would
begin importing from Europe. Hence, there goes HP's ink revenues
globally, rather than just in Europe. It would have proven to be an
interesting experiment had HP left things alone. I'm guessing the
European cartridges are going to have a price premium put on them.
It would have been interesting to see how much more non-European would
be willing to pay to have a cartridge which was easier to fill.
>
> I also wonder if the legislation makes any statements about how
durable the cartridges with an integrated head need to be... as in
how many times they must the refillable before they fail. It is
possible that the European versions may have to be more durable, also.

>
>
>>All I can say, is shame on HP. I don't believe this is the type of games
>>either the Hewlett or Packard founders would have encouraged.


>
> Bob Headrick wrote:

> You are mistaken on several counts and much of the above is not based on fact.
> I would have expected a more reasoned analysis from you Art, I know you can do
> better.
>
> - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 10:09:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Art,

As you clearly say, if companies wanted to grant us the best output
depending on our geographical (environmental) location, than I think
their should be an ink for Florida folk and a different ink people
people living in upstate NY.

In fact with many HP printers (I've lived through as much as 50 HP
printers -- lots of relatives to give used equipment to :-)) both my
Deskjet 9300 and Deskjet 6540 have a slider that allows you to tinker
the amount of ink placed on the printer.

I would tell the HP engineers and the those who pay them that they
would be better of investing in how to make the ink look better on
paper / last longer rather than invest in consumer-hitting actions
mentioned in this thread.

Chris
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 11:51:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

chribonn wrote:

>Art,
>
>As you clearly say, if companies wanted to grant us the best output
>depending on our geographical (environmental) location, than I think
>their should be an ink for Florida folk and a different ink people
>people living in upstate NY.
>
>

They could do that if you would like to pay $500 a cart.

>In fact with many HP printers (I've lived through as much as 50 HP
>printers -- lots of relatives to give used equipment to :-)) both my
>Deskjet 9300 and Deskjet 6540 have a slider that allows you to tinker
>the amount of ink placed on the printer.
>
>I would tell the HP engineers and the those who pay them that they
>would be better of investing in how to make the ink look better on
>paper / last longer rather than invest in consumer-hitting actions
>mentioned in this thread.
>
>Chris
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 5:09:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

As measekite said:
> They could do that if you would like to pay $500 a cart.

So why do they then insist of making ink in Europe different to
identical ink in the US, yet the Europen ink is costlier and the US ink
will not work on European market printers? It's as clear as crystal: HP
are unfairly profiteering.
!