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New PSU lacks 6-pin AUX connector

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July 18, 2006 11:45:42 PM

Okay.

My older computer's brandless 350-watt PSU peacefully died recently, so I went out and got a new one: an Antec TruePower 430 (was $40 at C-USA after rebate, same price as C-USA brandless 300).

However, my motherboard is of the early P4 era, and it has the 6-pin AUX connector (gnd, gnd, gnd, 3.3, 3.3, 5) that was removed for the ATX12V 2.0 specification.

My question is this: should I try to kludge up an aux connector using the molex from the fried PSU and wires from the 4 pins I don't need and an SATA, or should I just forget about the aux and hope the motherboard doesn' t overdraw on the 20-pin connector's (3) 3.3v and (4) 5v pins?

Thanks in advance.

More about : psu lacks pin aux connector

July 19, 2006 12:24:31 AM

Quote:
Okay.

My older computer's brandless 350-watt PSU peacefully died recently, so I went out and got a new one: an Antec TruePower 430 (was $40 at C-USA after rebate, same price as C-USA brandless 300).

However, my motherboard is of the early P4 era, and it has the 6-pin AUX connector (gnd, gnd, gnd, 3.3, 3.3, 5) that was removed for the ATX12V 2.0 specification.

My question is this: should I try to kludge up an aux connector using the molex from the fried PSU and wires from the 4 pins I don't need and an SATA, or should I just forget about the aux and hope the motherboard doesn' t overdraw on the 20-pin connector's (3) 3.3v and (4) 5v pins?

Thanks in advance.


i dont even have that plugged in. looks like a PCI-e plug right?


yeah, i changed PSU's and the new one did have it so i was like, eh...screw it. PC runs fine 24/7
July 19, 2006 12:48:29 AM

No, it doesn't look like a PCIe plug.

Back before the new 24 pin connector, in the late PIII-early P4 era (the dawning of the 533 FSB), there was a need among some few motherboards to draw current from 3.3v and 5v that would exceed the 20-pin connectors' amperage allowances.

Here's a link to an image of one (it won't let me post the image itself b/c I don't have 100 posts):

http://www.seasonic.com/images/faq22_6p.gif

And here's a link to the latest ATX standard, where it is mentioned in 4.1.1 (page 21):

http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/atx2_2.pdf

Point is, my mobo has a header for this, and no new PSUs have the connector. Surely someone has had to solve this issue by getting a converter, making their own, or simply not plugging an AUX in.
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July 19, 2006 6:21:07 AM

oh, well my mobo has a 6 pin conenctor on it .


See. says PSU fan but its wrong i think, i had it unplugged and it still ran the PSU fan.



anyways, try it w/o it wont boot if it doesnt get enough power.
July 19, 2006 2:17:15 PM

Ah yes the ones that look like half an AT (not ATX) psu connector.

(on an unrelated note I still prefer the AT standard to this day, I like a power switch that cuts the power, not one that nicely says to the computer 'could you please shut down for me now, if you feel like it that is, no pressure at all!')

I'd wager that as the new PSU is significantly more powerfull than PSUs in the days when this connector was commonplace, the PSU will be able to handle the extra 3.3v/5v load through the 20/24 pin connector anyway.

I cant see it having a negative impact other than the system refusing to boot, so I would definately give it a try.
July 19, 2006 2:53:38 PM

I have no problem thinking the PSU will be able to supply enough power to the board, I'm just a little concerned about the motherboard drawing that power from fewer wires than it thinks it can.

25 amps (say) at 3.3v from the 20-pin and aux equals 5 amps per pin.
25 amps at 3.3v from the 20-pin alone is 8+ amps per pin--will this overheat and melt the plastic connectors?
July 19, 2006 3:35:41 PM

Quote:
I have no problem thinking the PSU will be able to supply enough power to the board, I'm just a little concerned about the motherboard drawing that power from fewer wires than it thinks it can.

25 amps (say) at 3.3v from the 20-pin and aux equals 5 amps per pin.
25 amps at 3.3v from the 20-pin alone is 8+ amps per pin--will this overheat and melt the plastic connectors?


CPU's cant use 25 amps. also wires cant over heat. you can run 30 HDD's from 1 cable if ur PSU will support it.
July 19, 2006 3:49:45 PM

Quote:
CPU's cant use 25 amps. also wires cant over heat. you can run 30 HDD's from 1 cable if ur PSU will support it.


Wires can over heat, thats why we have fuses to protect the wires.
July 19, 2006 4:17:06 PM

Quote:
I have no problem thinking the PSU will be able to supply enough power to the board, I'm just a little concerned about the motherboard drawing that power from fewer wires than it thinks it can.

25 amps (say) at 3.3v from the 20-pin and aux equals 5 amps per pin.
25 amps at 3.3v from the 20-pin alone is 8+ amps per pin--will this overheat and melt the plastic connectors?


CPU's cant use 25 amps. also wires cant over heat. you can run 30 HDD's from 1 cable if ur PSU will support it.

WRONG! My god, where do you get your information.

IRT topic, you can try to rig a connector and it probably won't hurt. That connector was used on some server boards and yes, you do have to look at the pictures for the power supplies and make sure that connector is there, cause sometimes it's not listed in the specs of the PS but may still be present.

This FSP 350W has it.
a c 83 ) Power supply
a c 130 V Motherboard
July 19, 2006 4:22:10 PM

Wire CAN overheat, But it ain't gonna happen in a PC.

But anyone want to run a low(thin) wire with an AC unit? or better yet get a 9 volt battery and steel wool :) 
July 19, 2006 4:23:03 PM

Quote:
Wires can over heat, thats why we have fuses to protect the wires.


Yes they can, thats why they melt if you put loads of electrical power (Q x V) through them. Why do you think power lines have huge cables? Why do you think there is a limit to the size of silicon wires you can use in a CPU exists?
July 19, 2006 4:47:27 PM

well if cables don't overheat, so i didn't burn , so i didn't see a entire channel comming from the power supply making alot of smoke and burn all the plastic that is covering the copper wires. cables do overheat if they get a short circuit that's why they get burned.
July 19, 2006 4:53:38 PM

They don't even need a short circuit. If you pull too much current they will get hot.
April 20, 2009 5:16:02 PM

I know that this is a little bit after the fact, but...

You can find adapters that plug into an ATX connector and add a 6-pin AUX connector

here:

http://www.atxpowersupplies.com/6-pin-aux-connector-ada...

or here:

http://www.cwc-group.com/20atxpoextca.html

or here:

http://www.pcpartscollection.com/20atxpoextca.html

DISCLAIMER: I haven't bought any of these, so I cannot vouch for them.


...OR...

If you're feeling brave and have a 6-pin AUX connector that you're not using, you can always try patching into the wires on your 20-pin ATX connector. You can find pinouts and descriptions

here:

http://www.helpwithpcs.com/courses/power-supply-basics-...

In case anyone else comes upon this link, good luck!
!