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How to obtain the lightest ink laydown with the iP4000>

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Last response: in Computer Peripherals
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 10:25:18 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

From time to time, I make up sheets of business cards with special print-price
offers that I hand out at an event shoot. I create the layout with Adobe
Pagemaker then print sheets of 12 business-card-sized handouts. I want to print
on both sides of the letter-sized glossy photo paper.

The glossy side works fine but I find the back side needs a very light ink
laydown because it is not absorbent to any degree and must dry by evaporation.

I've tried to minimize the problem by using ultralight fonts in an effort to
reduce the drying time and "bloom" or "dot gain" but it's not working well.

What setting on the iP4000 will lay down the least ink?

Many thanks!

DaveinFLL
==========================
It's not the heat, it's the humidity
==========================
(Think the humidity's bad?
You should watch us vote!)
==========================

More about : obtain lightest ink laydown ip4000

May 15, 2005 2:40:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Your problem is not the printer, it's the paper. Some glossy photo papers
have the back coated and won't accept ink. Typical is the Costco Kirkland
glossy paper which works great with Canon printers (at a great price, I
might add) but will not accept ink on the backside. Epson glossy photo
paper also works extremely well but can be printed on the backside. It does
have a very light Epson logo repeat printed on the back and the weight is a
little less than some so you may or may not like it for cards. I have used
it for greeting cards and, when printed on the back the logo is so light in
comparison to the text or pictures I print that the Epson logo virtually
disappears. An excellent material that can be printed on both sides and
has the weight for cards is the Epson double sided matte paper. Pictures
are not as vivid as when printed on gloss paper, but I use it frequently for
greeting cards. There are some double sided glossy papers that someone on
the NG may be able to tell you about. You might just google it. I haven't
seen this type of paper stocked in the usual store except for specialty art
stores that cater to graphic artists. Another thought would be to to a fold
over card by setting up the back side upside down, printing only six per
page, and folding them over.

"David Mehall" <pixmaker@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:0r8d81d6i8ikmoikhnkvtgaoupe8mr1u2e@4ax.com...
> From time to time, I make up sheets of business cards with special
> print-price
> offers that I hand out at an event shoot. I create the layout with Adobe
> Pagemaker then print sheets of 12 business-card-sized handouts. I want to
> print
> on both sides of the letter-sized glossy photo paper.
>
> The glossy side works fine but I find the back side needs a very light ink
> laydown because it is not absorbent to any degree and must dry by
> evaporation.
>
> I've tried to minimize the problem by using ultralight fonts in an effort
> to
> reduce the drying time and "bloom" or "dot gain" but it's not working
> well.
>
> What setting on the iP4000 will lay down the least ink?
>
> Many thanks!
>
> DaveinFLL
> ==========================
> It's not the heat, it's the humidity
> ==========================
> (Think the humidity's bad?
> You should watch us vote!)
> ==========================
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 2:46:07 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The type of paper you are using isn't designed for duplex printing. Try
finding a double sided photo paper and that would be the best solution. In
order to reduce the ink laydown, go into properties and select custom for
the quality setting and reduce it to a lower value. Then under color
adjustment select manual and reduce the intensity to a low value. The image
will be light, but it might help.
Ron

"David Mehall" <pixmaker@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:0r8d81d6i8ikmoikhnkvtgaoupe8mr1u2e@4ax.com...
> From time to time, I make up sheets of business cards with special
> print-price
> offers that I hand out at an event shoot. I create the layout with Adobe
> Pagemaker then print sheets of 12 business-card-sized handouts. I want to
> print
> on both sides of the letter-sized glossy photo paper.
>
> The glossy side works fine but I find the back side needs a very light ink
> laydown because it is not absorbent to any degree and must dry by
> evaporation.
>
> I've tried to minimize the problem by using ultralight fonts in an effort
> to
> reduce the drying time and "bloom" or "dot gain" but it's not working
> well.
>
> What setting on the iP4000 will lay down the least ink?
>
> Many thanks!
>
> DaveinFLL
> ==========================
> It's not the heat, it's the humidity
> ==========================
> (Think the humidity's bad?
> You should watch us vote!)
> ==========================
Related resources
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 2:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Burt wrote:

>Your problem is not the printer, it's the paper. Some glossy photo papers
>have the back coated and won't accept ink. Typical is the Costco Kirkland
>glossy paper which works great with Canon printers (at a great price, I
>might add) but will not accept ink on the backside. Epson glossy photo
>paper also works extremely well but can be printed on the backside. It does
>have a very light Epson logo repeat printed on the back and the weight is a
>little less than some so you may or may not like it for cards. I have used
>it for greeting cards and, when printed on the back the logo is so light in
>comparison to the text or pictures I print that the Epson logo virtually
>disappears. An excellent material that can be printed on both sides and
>has the weight for cards is the Epson double sided matte paper.
>

They also make a single sided matte paper that they call something like
heavyweight. Yet the double sided is actually heavier and only a couple
of dollars more at Staples.

>Pictures
>are not as vivid as when printed on gloss paper, but I use it frequently for
>greeting cards. There are some double sided glossy papers that someone on
>the NG may be able to tell you about. You might just google it. I haven't
>seen this type of paper stocked in the usual store except for specialty art
>stores that cater to graphic artists. Another thought would be to to a fold
>over card by setting up the back side upside down, printing only six per
>page, and folding them over.
>
>"David Mehall" <pixmaker@comcast.net> wrote in message
>news:0r8d81d6i8ikmoikhnkvtgaoupe8mr1u2e@4ax.com...
>
>
>>From time to time, I make up sheets of business cards with special
>>print-price
>>offers that I hand out at an event shoot. I create the layout with Adobe
>>Pagemaker then print sheets of 12 business-card-sized handouts. I want to
>>print
>>on both sides of the letter-sized glossy photo paper.
>>
>>The glossy side works fine but I find the back side needs a very light ink
>>laydown because it is not absorbent to any degree and must dry by
>>evaporation.
>>
>>I've tried to minimize the problem by using ultralight fonts in an effort
>>to
>>reduce the drying time and "bloom" or "dot gain" but it's not working
>>well.
>>
>>What setting on the iP4000 will lay down the least ink?
>>
>>Many thanks!
>>
>>DaveinFLL
>>==========================
>>It's not the heat, it's the humidity
>>==========================
>> (Think the humidity's bad?
>> You should watch us vote!)
>>==========================
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
May 15, 2005 3:18:52 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I believe that David was inquiring about double side printing and the double
sided matte paper is designed for optimal printing on both sides with both
sides coated. Last week Staples had similar paper on sale - two for one -
and I picked up a few packs to try out.

"measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Tfvhe.16931$J12.13987@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
>
>
> Burt wrote:
>
>>Your problem is not the printer, it's the paper. Some glossy photo papers
>>have the back coated and won't accept ink. Typical is the Costco Kirkland
>>glossy paper which works great with Canon printers (at a great price, I
>>might add) but will not accept ink on the backside. Epson glossy photo
>>paper also works extremely well but can be printed on the backside. It
>>does have a very light Epson logo repeat printed on the back and the
>>weight is a little less than some so you may or may not like it for cards.
>>I have used it for greeting cards and, when printed on the back the logo
>>is so light in comparison to the text or pictures I print that the Epson
>>logo virtually disappears. An excellent material that can be printed on
>>both sides and has the weight for cards is the Epson double sided matte
>>paper.
>
> They also make a single sided matte paper that they call something like
> heavyweight. Yet the double sided is actually heavier and only a couple
> of dollars more at Staples.
>(snip)
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 4:32:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

David,
You might try Kodak "Picture Paper". It's 51 lb, 81/2 x 11 7mil.Soft Gloss
and can be printed on both sides without any logo or anything like that on
the other side.
I think I bought it at Sam's Club some time ago.
Kodak is not the best photo paper for making photos on a Canon IP4000 or
any Canon for that matter, but might very well work for the purpose you are
wanting to use it for.
Good luck,
Don

"Ron Cohen" <drc023@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:p cvhe.1637$sb5.47@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> The type of paper you are using isn't designed for duplex printing. Try
> finding a double sided photo paper and that would be the best solution. In
> order to reduce the ink laydown, go into properties and select custom for
> the quality setting and reduce it to a lower value. Then under color
> adjustment select manual and reduce the intensity to a low value. The
image
> will be light, but it might help.
> Ron
>
> "David Mehall" <pixmaker@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:0r8d81d6i8ikmoikhnkvtgaoupe8mr1u2e@4ax.com...
> > From time to time, I make up sheets of business cards with special
> > print-price
> > offers that I hand out at an event shoot. I create the layout with
Adobe
> > Pagemaker then print sheets of 12 business-card-sized handouts. I want
to
> > print
> > on both sides of the letter-sized glossy photo paper.
> >
> > The glossy side works fine but I find the back side needs a very light
ink
> > laydown because it is not absorbent to any degree and must dry by
> > evaporation.
> >
> > I've tried to minimize the problem by using ultralight fonts in an
effort
> > to
> > reduce the drying time and "bloom" or "dot gain" but it's not working
> > well.
> >
> > What setting on the iP4000 will lay down the least ink?
> >
> > Many thanks!
> >
> > DaveinFLL
> > ==========================
> > It's not the heat, it's the humidity
> > ==========================
> > (Think the humidity's bad?
> > You should watch us vote!)
> > ==========================
>
>
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 1:10:22 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

You might want to try the transparency setting, this setting should
laydown the least amount of ink.