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AMD/INTEL Video Encoding Tight Budget

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  • Video Encoding
  • AMD
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July 20, 2006 5:36:47 PM

I've got about a $400-$500 budget to play with. [EDIT] Or as close to the $500 dollar mark as I can get without going over to much.[/EDIT]

I have to submit a build plan by tomorrow. I'm doing as much research as I can but I'm swamped with other tasks as well. Please help.

I'm pretty new to building pc's that have all the new technology. I'm still running a P11 350Mhz. Yikes.

[EDIT] After further research, any AMD Dual Core pulls me out of the $500 price point. So disregard the next sentence.[/EDIT]
[DISREGARD]I've made my mind up knowing that I definitely want an AMD Dual Core with the AM2 socket mobo.[/DISREGARD]

Now that I'm looking at it looks like the Intel D805 could do the job just fine at a better price point then any AMD Dual Core.

But I'm totally on the fence as to what mobo, case, psu, hd, mem and vid card to get with my budget constrants.

I'm going to be making Desktop Videos with "Camtasia Studio", and I would like to start playing some games. I like FPS'ers like Ghost Recon and such.

Recommended System Requirements for Camtasia Studio:
1.0 GHz processor minimum
Recommended: 2.5 GHz*
256 MB RAM minimum
Recommended: 1 GB

The main goal is to get a machine built quickly as cheap as possible but **stable**, heat and psu wise. I don't plan on doing any overclocking. I just need something that works for now. I'll OC later.

Recommendations for AMD Dual Core CPU / AM2 socket type?

Case?

PSU?

Mobo?

Mem?

HD?

Sound? Sounds not huge. If its builtin, then great.

Vid Card? I have a CRT monitor right now but plan on getting a Flat LCD soon wich uses DVI I believe.

I have an Exteranl DVD+-RW USB drive and an Internal IDE Lite-On CDRW.

TIA for any recommendations.

More about : amd intel video encoding tight budget

July 20, 2006 7:21:39 PM

You will HAVE to save up more than $500 for this build, even with the AMD price cuts coming July 24th.

CPU: AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+

Mobo: Asus M2N-E

RAM: Corsair XMS2 1GB (2 x 512MB) DDR2-800

Video card: eVGA Geforce 7600GT

Power Supply: Antec Truepower 480W

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 250GB SATA2

Sound: Don't bother with a seperate sound card. The onboard sound is good enough, unless you are really crazy about sound. If you are, go for Creative SoundBlaster X-Fi XtremeMusic
July 20, 2006 7:51:30 PM

He'd be better off with the X1600 XT for video encoding.
Related resources
July 20, 2006 8:56:40 PM

For that budget, its going to be hard to build for both gaming and video encoding. You could probably save some cash by getting a 6 series card (or whatever the ATi equivalent is). Limiting your storage a little bit might shave it some. Just get a cheapie case, that will help. I don't think you can do it though.
July 20, 2006 9:16:24 PM

Quote:
For that budget, its going to be hard to build for both gaming and video encoding. You could probably save some cash by getting a 6 series card (or whatever the ATi equivalent is). Limiting your storage a little bit might shave it some. Just get a cheapie case, that will help. I don't think you can do it though.


Thanks for all the input everyone. I told these people that tyring to do video encoding alone is going to cost them bucks for even a mid range Vid card.
I'm just gonna have to come up with the best price point that I can offer them without letting them get into a total POS machine. Plus the owners wife doesn't allow him to make any of the Tech by choices anymore because of his past performance. She knows that I'm trying to get something cheap but that I refuse to get them into something that's a piece of junk. She knows I'll do my best.

I think I'm going to go with the Intel D805 and work from there. I'm home now so I can spend the rest of my day researching. Thanks again.
July 21, 2006 12:20:28 AM

Quote:
For that budget, its going to be hard to build for both gaming and video encoding. You could probably save some cash by getting a 6 series card (or whatever the ATi equivalent is). Limiting your storage a little bit might shave it some. Just get a cheapie case, that will help. I don't think you can do it though.


Thanks for all the input everyone. I told these people that tyring to do video encoding alone is going to cost them bucks for even a mid range Vid card.
I'm just gonna have to come up with the best price point that I can offer them without letting them get into a total POS machine. Plus the owners wife doesn't allow him to make any of the Tech by choices anymore because of his past performance. She knows that I'm trying to get something cheap but that I refuse to get them into something that's a piece of junk. She knows I'll do my best.

I think I'm going to go with the Intel D805 and work from there. I'm home now so I can spend the rest of my day researching. Thanks again.

If you want an Intel, don't get the 805D.. get a better one. Especially with encoding. Or get a 3800+X2. but not a 805D...
July 21, 2006 12:40:34 AM

Quote:
I think I'm going to go with the Intel D805 and work from there. I'm home now so I can spend the rest of my day researching. Thanks again.


The CPU is more of a concern in terms of video encoding than the GPU is. Since you're not limited to AMD now, here are my new suggestions:

CPU: Intel Pentium D 805 <--- I don't really want to recommend this, but get the board i've suggested, and you will be able to upgrade to a Conroe chip (go for the E6300) later..... preferably sooner.

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3

RAM: OCZ Gold 1GB (2 x 512MB) DDR2-800

Video: eVGA Geforce 7300LE <--- Upgrade this later

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 80GB SATA2

Power supply: Antec Truepower 430W

Drop the sound card altogether.

Total before taxes and shipping: $547.94
July 21, 2006 1:04:32 AM

Quote:
I think I'm going to go with the Intel D805 and work from there. I'm home now so I can spend the rest of my day researching. Thanks again.


The CPU is more of a concern in terms of video encoding than the GPU is. Since you're not limited to AMD now, here are my new suggestions:

CPU: Intel Pentium D 805 <--- I don't really want to recommend this, but get the board i've suggested, and you will be able to upgrade to a Conroe chip (go for the E6300) later..... preferably sooner.

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3

RAM: OCZ Gold 1GB (2 x 512MB) DDR2-800

Video: eVGA Geforce 7300LE <--- Upgrade this later

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 80GB SATA2

Power supply: Antec Truepower 430W

Drop the sound card altogether.

Total before taxes and shipping: $547.94

I hate having to suggest the 805 too, but the 930 is $174 which breaks the bank.

To the orginial poster: Let's be blunt- the 805 sucks. Unless you overclock the crap out of it, its awful. If there is ANYWAY possible try to get the Pentium D 930. However, with the price cuts of July 24th, the 3800 X2 will be around $150 which is cheaper than the 930.
July 21, 2006 1:27:25 AM

i know you dont want to overclock, but you money would be best spend buying a decent board thats good for overclocking AND supports conroe

invest in a decent cpu cooler... look on ebay perhaps, because heatsinks (to an extent) cant be broken by overuse like components can.

overclock the 805 as much as you can. it will save you alot of money, and give you a big performance increase.

when your cpu either fries after a year or two, or becomes obsolete for the video editing you want it to do (it wont take long, trust me) throw in a conroe and you will have a fully capable system, without having to completely redo the entire thing.

also, if you have an old computer you may be able to salvage parts from that. namely the case, psu, hdd, and optical drive
July 21, 2006 3:07:19 AM

Thanks "The_Prophecy" and others,

Quote:
The CPU is more of a concern in terms of video encoding than the GPU is. Since you're not limited to AMD now, here are my new suggestions:

CPU: Intel Pentium D 805 <--- I don't really want to recommend this, but get the board i've suggested, and you will be able to upgrade to a Conroe chip (go for the E6300) later..... preferably sooner.

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3

RAM: OCZ Gold 1GB (2 x 512MB) DDR2-800

Video: eVGA Geforce 7300LE <--- Upgrade this later

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.9 80GB SATA2

Power supply: Antec Truepower 430W

Drop the sound card altogether.

Total before taxes and shipping: $547.94


Sweet. All of these items look top shelf for the price and all have great reviews. I especially like the Mobo. This will allow me to upgrade to nicer stuff once I have the money. And after looking at the article here, about the new Core2 Duo, I will definitely be going that route. The E6600 looks to be the sweet spot in regards to price/performance, from what I can tell anyways.

Stupid question that I keep forgeting to ask. Do I need to have a copy of Windows XP Pro 64bit version or not? I mean with a regular 32bit version running on the higher end processors will there be any performance issues? I can't think of any 64bit apps that I would run but I just wanted to make sure that with the higher end cpu's that I won't be loosing any perfomance gains within the cpu itself if I have a 32bit version of XP installed. I hope that made since.

Thanks again everyone.
July 21, 2006 3:53:59 AM

Honestly, I would avoid XP x64 altogether. If you make the move to Vista once it is finally released, get the 64bit version of it.
July 21, 2006 8:42:58 AM

I wouldnt buy vista as soon as it ships. wait for a few months for the first price drop, then check back here to see how driver support / performance is
July 21, 2006 1:07:22 PM

Awesome.

Thanks again everyone. You guys Rock!!. 8)

Now they want a nice LCD monitor. So now I'm off to researching the in's and outs of those. And a higher end vid card. I told them that processor prices will be dropping pretty soon and that a $1000 price range will get them into a very nice system with an LCD display.

A $500 price point for the type of system that they want to build, isn't realistic. So now I've got some more time to learn more and research before the CPU prices drop. As well, I've got them now willing to spend a little more money.
July 21, 2006 5:39:39 PM

Quote:
I wouldnt buy vista as soon as it ships. wait for a few months for the first price drop, then check back here to see how driver support / performance is


What price drop? XP costs the same today as it did on release in 2001.
July 21, 2006 8:19:49 PM

Quote:
What price drop? XP costs the same today as it did on release in 2001.


wtf? what did you just crawl out from under? in my country? xp home 2001 = $339 xp home 2006 = $169
July 22, 2006 12:16:55 AM

Quote:
What price drop? XP costs the same today as it did on release in 2001.


wtf? what did you just crawl out from under? in my country? xp home 2001 = $339 xp home 2006 = $169

XP Home = 199 in 2001 XP Home= 199 now at retail.
July 22, 2006 3:33:00 AM

Hint - get an OEM copy from the local mom and pop shop. $159-$169. Buy a couple of fans or other things you need to be fair to them, of course, since that's maybe $10 profit for them.
July 22, 2006 3:41:52 AM

Quote:
Hint - get an OEM copy from the local mom and pop shop. $159-$169. Buy a couple of fans or other things you need to be fair to them, of course, since that's maybe $10 profit for them.


Yeah of course :)  Well XP Home is $89 OEM on Newegg. But I was just trying to pove my point lol.
August 5, 2006 6:19:09 AM

Well, good news.

The day that I was about to purchase the parts for this new computer, one of the investors came in and he happened to be somewhat computer savvy. After listening to me rant about trying to build a nice computer on a such a small budget he said to hold off on the purchase.

Long story short, I have a new budget to work with. He didn't give me a definitive price range but said that I could basically build what I wanted within reason. IE... meaning I only had to justify why I'm choosing the parts that I'm choosing. With THG's site and the test and stats pulled from various articles I can atleast rationalize my logic behind the purchases. That's the nice part about this site. The work is already done. And it's pretty easy to sell something that's backed up with factual data. Whoot Whooot.. Plus I indicated, that what I would build, would be more around the $3,000 range.

So, I know without a doubt now, that I want to build this system around the purchase of the Core 2 Duo, E6600. From the research done by this site and others, this is cleary the sweet spot, price/perfomance wise when compaired to the competition (AMD).

I want this thing to scream. I listen to music, play Ghost Recon AW and other FPS'ers, have Outlook and Firefox running with 5 or 6 tabs, running NortonAV, and Camtasia Studio for work which is doing all the video encoding/converting and capturing.

Core 2 Duo E6600 $345

UltraSharp 2407WFP 24-inch Widescreen Flat Panel LCD Monitor (Gives me all the realastate that I need for work and play.) $750

GeForce 7950 GX2 $500

2 x Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 250GB Hard Drive
Serial ATA-300, 7,200 RPM, 16MB (Raid 0) x2= $160

I'm on the fence when it comes to which Mobo, Mem, Case and PSU to get especially with Core 2 Duo being so new. As well, I don't know which Mobo is going to work the best with the GeForce 7950 GX2?

Mobo?
No skimping here. ASUS is looking the most mature with real rich features, but I'm not sure if the vid card will work with this board.

Ram?
4 gigs would do me more than perfect.

PowerSupply?
Don't want to skimp here. Want quality and something that allows for additional components to be added in the future. More HD's probably for a Raid 5 array.

Case?
I want a Full Tower case with plenty of room. Nothing fancy.

Extra Case Fans?
Not sure if I will need those or not. More than likely I will. I've heard that the vid card above gets pretty hot when under load for long periods.

Any help from the pro's to help wrap this purchase up is appreciated.

Thanks.
August 5, 2006 6:33:38 PM

Quote:
Core 2 Duo E6600 $345

The E6600 is $6 cheaper here

Quote:
UltraSharp 2407WFP 24-inch Widescreen Flat Panel LCD Monitor (Gives me all the realastate that I need for work and play.) $750

Could save a little bit by getting the Acer AL2416WD

Quote:
GeForce 7950 GX2 $500

Drop to an eVGA Geforce 7900GT KO and get a DX 10 card when they come out in 6 months or so. No sense in wasting over $500 on a video card you're going to only use for a short time.

Quote:
2 x Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 250GB Hard Drive
Serial ATA-300, 7,200 RPM, 16MB (Raid 0) x2= $160

Swap these for a couple of Seagate's 7200.10 320GB SATA2 drives.

Quote:
I'm on the fence when it comes to which Mobo, Mem, Case and PSU to get especially with Core 2 Duo being so new.

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-965P-DQ6 <--- Provides Kentsfield support as well.

Quote:
Ram? 4 gigs would do me more than perfect.

DO NOT get 4GB of ram until Vista arrives. 4GB won't be recognized by or fully utilized by any 32bit operating system, and XP x64 is a waste of time. Stick with this Corsair XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) DDR2-800 for now. Pick up another set if you end up switching to Vista down the road.

Quote:
PowerSupply? Don't want to skimp here. Want quality and something that allows for additional components to be added in the future. More HD's probably for a Raid 5 array.

Antec Truepower 550W

Quote:
Case? I want a Full Tower case with plenty of room. Nothing fancy.

Antec P180

Quote:
Extra Case Fans? Not sure if I will need those or not. More than likely I will. I've heard that the vid card above gets pretty hot when under load for long periods.

The P180 should have some fans, but if you want to add more (provided there is room), pick up a couple of these
August 5, 2006 7:09:26 PM

Is camtasia studio even MULTITHREADED? If it's not, you're wasting your money on the dual core cpus and would benefit much more from a regular athlon 64. Make sure the software you plan to use is mulitthreaded before buying any hardware.
August 5, 2006 7:30:59 PM

Any programs that aren't multithreaded yet will probably be rewritten to take advantage of dual core chips in the near future, since everyone is heading that way now.
August 5, 2006 8:05:09 PM

Then in the future, he could replace a single core cpu with a new multicore cpu that has much better performance than today's offerings, at a much better price. There's no point to buy one now if it won't be utilized by the software being used.
August 5, 2006 8:51:59 PM

Actually there is a point. Buy it now and take a slight performance hit in non-multithreaded apps, then he won't have to pay again later to upgrade to a midrange chip.
August 6, 2006 5:00:47 AM

Like I'm sure his software program is going to role out a new version overnight with multithreaded in mind. :roll: Ya, right. Keep dreamin'.

That same ideology was used by other people when deciding between an Intel P4 and a comparable AMD64 three years ago. "Gotta get the 64 bit cpu because software is going to go 64 bit in the near future." Uh huh. Sure it did. Oh, wait...nope, my mistake. 64 bit still hasn't caught on yet. Ya, those guys buying those Athlon64 2800s for $200 sure were smart thinkers. Now they'll be ready when vista comes. Never mind that they're stuck with a dead platform using single channel memory, an agp card, and a cpu that is about as weak as the entry level $60 cpus offered today by Intel and AMD. No, let's not consider those things. I'm sure the A64 2800 is still plenty fast enough, and the 3 years spent suffering with sub par performance when they could have purchased a 2.8C for the same price was well worth it to now finally be able to use that all-important 64 bit feature. Well, whenever Vista is ready that is. :lol: 

But hey, you go ahead and recommend a dual core cpu to run single threaded apps. Then, in three more years when the program finally is updated for multithreads, the guy can sit back and smile on how smart he was to buy a $180 dual core processor when he first built the rig. Never mind that cpus had since moved on to 16 cores per cpu, or that for $180 he could now get a processor that is twice as fast as the one he purchased three years ago. No, let's not think about that. It is much easier to live in a delusional state than it is to be realistic about these things.
August 6, 2006 5:22:58 AM

Chances are slim, but it's still possible. It may not happen right away but sooner or later (my bet being sooner) it's going to happen.
August 8, 2006 6:15:10 AM

Quote:
Is camtasia studio even MULTITHREADED? If it's not, you're wasting your money on the dual core cpus and would benefit much more from a regular athlon 64. Make sure the software you plan to use is mulitthreaded before buying any hardware.


Thanks for the input JoeFriday. I don't pretend to know much and the Camtasia Studio app is just one app that I work with. I'm almost certain that it's not multithreaded. But in general that's just one app that I will be working with among many that deal with video and audio encoding from one format to another. And these are huge files. Like 400 to 500 MByte files. Plus I will be writting my own app's with MS Visual Studio, mainly utilizing C#. Anyways......

This is what my bro told me and why, (doing the type of work that I will be doing), I would benifit from having a dual core cpu. And I'm not trying to talk down to you. I'm simply quoting what my bro said.
Quote:
There are threaded apps and there are THREADED apps. Lots of apps spin up a few extra threads to run different app components on, like running the UI on one thread, and a database connector on another one and the rest of the app on the main thread.

That type of concurrency is simple, and intended only to prevent "blocking" behavior. Blocking behavior is what happens, for example, when: you write a simple app that runs everything on a single thread and then you: click File, Save, and, because you're saving to a really slow flash drive, it takes 4mins to save a tiny file. During that time, the entire app UI is "blocked" from receiving and processing messages from windows, like instructions to redraw itself when you open another window on top of it.

I know you've seen apps like this that get trails and remainders of other windows imprinted on them until they're done thinking. That's because the UI and the "save" function are running on the same thread, and they "take turns" (in effect) listening for user or windows input. Many apps run the UI on the main thread (the default thread you get when any process starts) and only deliberately create new threads when performing a potentially "blocking" behavior like accessing anything over a network connection or performing potentially lengthy IO routines like reading/writing big files.

Again, that type of threading is relatively easy because you aren't trying to take advantage of multiple processors (and all of the issues regarding synchronization of variables across CPUs and shit like that), you're just trying to exploit the host operating system's ability to pre-emptively multitask and schedule threads.
Your whole OS won't freeze because some jerk opens a huge file from a slow flash drive right? Of course not. It just services hardware interrupts from the device and its driver(s) when asked to, and continues to run the rest of the processes and threads that are in the queue, including your UI thread.
The next most difficult type of concurrency is when you need to split a large data processing task across as many CPUs as possible. Unlike the "blocking" problem i just illustrated, your task won't benefit at all by being split onto just one CPU. A good example is the codec for any type of encryption of compression algorithm, be it network communication (SSL), video (DIVX/XVID/MPEG), or audio (MP3/WMA/AAC). These tasks tend to have distinct start and end points, so the algorithm can identify a "load" to split into threads when more than one cpu is available, which nearly always divides the task time by the number of available CPUs.
One thing that dual cpu configurations are really good at is servicing hardware interrupts. So doing things like burning CDs and scanning and ripping videos to disk works a lot better when you have more than one cpu or core.


The other selfish peice to this is that I love video games. Well not neccessarily all video games but the graphics. I love First Person Shooters and I'll admit it. I'm addicted to video Crack. So I want a system that can not only do all my work tasks (all at the same time) but display the games I like to play in the best fashion possible.

So, since I've pretty much been given the go ahead to build a machine to the spec's I deem, within a sizable budget, (which wasn't the case when I started this thread) wouldn't you do the same? I'm always open to others suggestings. Judging from the type of work I'm doing and around a $2500 budget, what would you suggest for hardware. My bro wants me to stick with AMD Dual Core and Nvidia 590 SLI setup.

But why go AMD when the Intel's E6600 for $350 is beating Athlons 64 FX-62 in almost all benchmarks I've seen? Which still cost's around $800-$1200. Knowing that I can spend some money, this looks to be the sweet spot to me.
NOW, I just wish that Nvidia would get their Nforce 590 SLI chipsets on these Intel boards sooooooner. When I moved I left my Xbox behind and I'm in need of a serious Video fixin.


Quote:
UltraSharp 2407WFP 24-inch Widescreen Flat Panel LCD Monitor (Gives me all the realastate that I need for work and play.) $750

Could save a little bit by getting the Acer AL2416WD

Yeah, that's true but for $50 more dollars I can get the Dell 2407WFP that has all the nice bells and whistles for transferring and watching video from my camcorder. Plus an assortment of other goodies like the Card readers.
Check the amazing specs out HERE.
Compare Dells connectors:

    [*:fc2ef2149f]VGA
    [*:fc2ef2149f]DVI
    [*:fc2ef2149f]DC power connector for Dell SoundBar
    [*:fc2ef2149f]Composite Video
    [*:fc2ef2149f]S-Video
    [*:fc2ef2149f]Component
    [*:fc2ef2149f]USB Upstream Port
    [*:fc2ef2149f]Two USB Downstream Port
    [*:fc2ef2149f]An Additional 2 USB Downstream Ports on the side
    [*:fc2ef2149f]9-in-2 Media Card reader on the side


    Too Acers:

      [*:fc2ef2149f]VGA
      [*:fc2ef2149f]DVI




      Quote:
      GeForce 7950 GX2 $500

      Drop to an eVGA Geforce 7900GT KO and get a DX 10 card when they come out in 6 months or so. No sense in wasting over $500 on a video card you're going to only use for a short time.

      Woops. Thanks. Can you recommend something else as powerful here. In my research I found somethings very troubling going on about this card here at Evga's forums.
      This forum thread is 3 pages with over 65 post's. Everyone complaining of cards dying on them and Evga looks to be blowing smoke somewhat.


      Quote:
      2 x Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 250GB Hard Drive
      Serial ATA-300, 7,200 RPM, 16MB (Raid 0) x2= $160

      Swap these for a couple of Seagate's 7200.10 320GB SATA2 drives.

      Dhop.. Thanks.

      Quote:
      I'm on the fence when it comes to which Mobo, Mem, Case and PSU to get especially with Core 2 Duo being so new.

      Mobo: Gigabyte GA-965P-DQ6 <--- Provides Kentsfield support as well.

      Do you know when the Nvidia Nforce 590 SLI chipsets are going to start making it onto the Mobo's with the LGA775 sockets? My friend has got a nice AMD setup with the new 590 SLI chipset. I really like all of the features that chipset brings to the consumers.



      Quote:
      Ram? 4 gigs would do me more than perfect.

      DO NOT get 4GB of ram until Vista arrives. 4GB won't be recognized by or fully utilized by any 32bit operating system, and XP x64 is a waste of time. Stick with this Corsair XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) DDR2-800 for now. Pick up another set if you end up switching to Vista down the road.

      Thanks. At that price, 4 gigs would be to much money. Actually at that price I hope it cooks breakfeast for me as well. :D 

      Quote:
      PowerSupply? Don't want to skimp here. Want quality and something that allows for additional components to be added in the future. More HD's probably for a Raid 5 array.

      Antec Truepower 550W

      Nice. That did very well in Tom's stress test.

      Quote:
      Case? I want a Full Tower case with plenty of room. Nothing fancy.

      Antec P180

      Nice. I like that.

      Quote:
      Extra Case Fans? Not sure if I will need those or not. More than likely I will. I've heard that the vid card above gets pretty hot when under load for long periods.

      The P180 should have some fans, but if you want to add more (provided there is room), pick up a couple of these

      With that case you listed I don't think I'll need any more fans than what comes with it. Oh yeah. Why doesn't Intel ship their CPU's with HSF's. I have to buy one of those as well.

      Thanks as always.
August 8, 2006 7:11:51 AM

The problems regarding eVGA's 7900GT cards have been admitted by eVGA. They have begun shipping cards without the widely known defect (I believe it was a voltage issue, although i'm not sure).

The Intel version of the NF 590 chipsets shouldn't be too far off, although I still say SLI is a complete waste of time and money.

On your last comment. Intel ships heatsinks with all of their retail boxed CPU's. If you saw a CPU advertised without one, it was an OEM product, or a scam. The stock heatsink will do fine on the Core 2's unless you're planning on overclocking by more than 800Mhz.
August 8, 2006 8:40:44 AM

Quote:
He'd be better off with the X1600 XT for video encoding.


I agree with that. The X1000 Series do have AVIVO technology. Although I haven't tried it yet but it could really speed up video encoding and help offload the CPU.

Anyway since you are on budget, I suggest that for the meantime you stick with IGP since you can upgrade anytime. For AMD CPU's anyboard will do since the memory controller is integrated and won't differ in the performance however you'll invest in some good quality ram.

If you go the Intel way, chipsets do matter since they contain the memory controller. In the case of Conroe, any memory will do since it is not limited by the speed of ram.

Good luck. :wink:
!