Can the E6600 multiplier be dropped?

To say 8X instead of its regular 9X? Thanks.
19 answers Last reply
More about e6600 multiplier dropped
  1. nope
  2. Damn.
  3. only X6800 Extreme's multiplier can be dropped in Conroe series, i think
  4. If you enable EIST, I am sure the multi will drop to atleast 6.
  5. The X6800 comes with an open multiplier. The possibility to raise or lower the multiplier can make overclocking easier. Regular Core 2 Duo CPUs have a locked multiplier and can be overclocked only by increasing the FSB frequency.
  6. Quote:
    The X6800 comes with an open multiplier. The possibility to raise or lower the multiplier can make overclocking easier. Regular Core 2 Duo CPUs have a locked multiplier and can be overclocked only by increasing the FSB frequency.


    He's taking about manually underclocking the CPU by lowering the multiplier.

    Conroe will the Speedstep technology, I think I read somewhere that Conroe slows down to 1.6GHz (266.67MHz x 6). If that's the case for all Conroe models then the E6300's will not drop by much since it is clocked at 1.86GHz (266.67MHz x 7).

    EIST = Enchance Intel Speedstep Technology.
  7. all but the 6800 are locked, means manually you can not change it, overclocking is done entirely on the FSB
  8. Quote:
    To say 8X instead of its regular 9X? Thanks.



    Yes, you can, although not all mobos will support it.

    Don't listen to the people saying you can't - all of the regular Conroes are unlocked downwards to 6x.
  9. Quote:
    Overclocking:
    In our earlier Presler article we have demonstrated that the 65nm based dual core 9xx series is great overclocking material. In particular the lower clocked versions, like the 920, have huge frequency headroom. We could run an aircooled 920 at 4.2 GHz; that is 50% above default. Many users report that their Pentium D 920 are running air-cooled at 4.00 GHz or higher. The reason for this huge headroom is obviously Intel’s high yielding 65nm production technology. It’s reducing the temperature and current leakage that troubled 90nm based processors like Prescott and Smithfield. Conroe is of course produced with 65nm technology as well, and therefore we expected similarly good overclocking results to the 65nm Presler based 9xx series.

    The X6800 comes with an open multiplier. The possibility to raise or lower the multiplier can make overclocking easier. Regular Core 2 Duo CPUs have a locked multiplier and can be overclocked only by increasing the FSB frequency. For a realistic evaluation of Conroe’s overclocking potential we decided to use the E6700 instead of the X6800, because the latter will be priced out of reach for most users. We also intentionally did not use a more sophisticated cooling solution, like watercooling or phase-change. Just the regular retail Intel heatsink and fan provided with the boxed product had to do. The idea was to demonstrate what a user without any additional equipment can achieve with Conroe “out of the box”.

    Before we could indulge ourselves in the pleasures of overclocking we had to solve a little problem though: The Intel 975BXB motherboard has a full array of overclocking features, such as a 50% FSB frequency override, voltage adjustments for CPU, MCH and FSB, and few things more. These BIOS features however are only available if the 975XBX is used with a Pentium D or Core 2 Duo “Extreme” processor. Intel started this product policy some time ago with the 955XBK motherboard. If the 955XBK and the 975XBX are used with a regular, that is “non-extreme” CPU, all voltage adjustments are hidden. We tried it this way, and found that without the support of additional voltage the E6700 went up from the default frequency of 10 x 266 MHz = 2.66 GHz to around 10 x 330 MHz = 3.30 GHz.

    This is not bad at all, but we assumed that more is possible, and resorted to a slight modification of the 975XBX to gain access to the BIOS voltage options. Unlike the boxed retail 975XBX motherboard, engineering samples come for evaluation purposes with an additional “OC Debug” jumper. When closing this jumper the BIOS gives access to the full range of overclocking tools regardless of what CPU is used. Unfortunately our retail board did not have this jumper installed. But even for an inexperienced user it is quite easy to connect the 2 solder points either by solder or conductive fluid. After the 2 points are connected the full range of overclocking features is available. It’s regrettable that Intel is trying to reserve the overclocking tools for the Extreme Editions only, because in terms of features, performance and stability the 975XBX is an excellent product for a very reasonable price.
    Overclocker.com
  10. They meant upwards. It's overclockers.com, not underclockers.com. It's unlocked downwards to 6x.
  11. Can you link me to a site showing otherwise?
  12. http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=107892

    I know you wouldn't call that a valid source, but it's still right. It's just like AMD's chips were unlocked downwards for CnQ, except now Intel chips are unlocked downwards for EIST.
  13. I read a few posts, and they indicated that this was due to that processor being an Engineering Sample chip, but retail will probably be locked downwards also.

    Do you agree?
  14. Well, no accualy I wanted to run a E6600 @ 3.0GHZ with 1500FSB, I just like all those nice even numbers :).
  15. Quote:
    I read a few posts, and they indicated that this was due to that processor being an Engineering Sample chip, but retail will probably be locked downwards also.

    Do you agree?



    It would be very difficult to unlock the chip for EIST but make it locked for the motherboard. It would be a waste of engineering effort, and I would doubt Intel would do that. If the ES were going to be unlocked differently than the retail chips, then why not have them unlocked upwards as well?
  16. The ES's may be unlocked upwards as well as downwards... that is how Intel used to do them...
    The E6800's are unlocked both ways...

    I would have thought the retail 6700 and lower chips would have been only unlocked upwards, but reading user reports it seems that a couple of them said they were locked even downwards...
    But I am not sure of the validity of such... anyone else?
  17. Don't know if it helps and it's regarding the E6300, not the E6700, but Xbit states the E6300 is multilpier locked. Yet page 2 of the same review states:
    Quote:
    Besides the lower clock speed (it is 1.86GHz for Core 2 Duo E6300) and smaller L2 cache, there are no other differences between the youngest model of the new family and the top-of-the-line solutions including Core 2 Extreme. It boasts all the strengths of the Core microarchitecture based products

    I would think they meant aside from the locked multiplier though.

    This would lead me to think that regardless of locked multipliers or not, all Core Processors support Enhanced Speedstep as page 8 of the "Getting Ready to Meet Intel Core 2 Duo: Core Microarchitecture Unleashed" article from Xbit suggests. However, this article (6/29/06) is a bit older than the E6300 (7/13/06) article as well as the "Contemporary Dual-Core Desktop Processors Shootout" article (7/19/06) which covers overclocking the E6800 as well.

    My questions being, is it possible Enhanced Speedstep Technology may not rely on lowering the multiplier to work? Most info I found just states it lowers the frequency and the voltage, but it doesn't go into how the frequency is lowered. Or perhaps the Core CPUs are unlocked and depending on the motherboard you use it might be possible to run them in an unlocked mode with a jumper setting or a little bit of soldering like the way overclockers.com did. I find the latter very unlikely. I doubt Intel would give board manufacturers that much control over their architecture and processors, but you never know.

    Sorry, this could all be moot. I tried looking for a good definition of Intel's newer Enhanced Speedstep technology but didn't come up with much. I guess I'm just not clear because I don't think Speedstep works by lowering the multiplier the way AMD's Cool n' Quiet does. Sorry for the noobishness.
  18. Quote:
    Sorry, this could all be moot. I tried looking for a good definition of Intel's newer Enhanced Speedstep technology but didn't come up with much. I guess I'm just not clear because I don't think Speedstep works by lowering the multiplier the way AMD's Cool n' Quiet does. Sorry for the noobishness.



    It works by lowering the multiplier. It is, afterall, the only way of decreasing the frequency besides lowering the FSB. EIST also reduces the voltage in addition to lowering the frequency.
  19. You would tend to think that if you lowered the FSB, you could then lower the voltage on the vcore and memory too, saving power even more than just dropping the multiplier and voltage
Ask a new question

Read More

CPUs