Fading inkjet photos

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?

Is it the chemical mix of ink on the photo paper, maybe some photo
papers are better than others. If you were to print on plain paper
then would the photo still fade?

Is it the exposure to strong light such as sunlight the causes a
inkjet photo to fade. Do photos kept in photo albums still fade?

Regards Brian
25 answers Last reply
More about fading inkjet photos
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    > I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    > so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >
    > Is it the chemical mix of ink on the photo paper, maybe some photo
    > papers are better than others. If you were to print on plain paper
    > then would the photo still fade?
    >
    > Is it the exposure to strong light such as sunlight the causes a
    > inkjet photo to fade. Do photos kept in photo albums still fade?
    >
    > Regards Brian
    >

    All of the above.

    Exposure to light & air are two big factors. Also playing a big part though
    is the ink, and the paper. Dye based photos will still fade in an album,
    just much more slowly. Laminating a photo will reduce fading significantly
    BUT you then introduce other issues - is the laminate going to react with
    the photo? Will it give off any chemicals, acid etc that will cause
    deterioration of their own. Also, how easy is it to remove the laminate -
    this may become an issue if you ever want to copy or restore the photo.

    Some photo papers are better at sealing in/absorbing the ink, and not
    letting in air, so will fade less quickly. Some kinds of ink are more
    susceptible to fade than others. For instance the new Epson pigment inks are
    very fade resistant.

    One thing to note: most archival ratings given by manufacturers are for
    under glass, out of direct sunlight.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ozone and other chemicals are one of the main problems.

    Brian wrote:

    >I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >
    >Is it the chemical mix of ink on the photo paper, maybe some photo
    >papers are better than others. If you were to print on plain paper
    >then would the photo still fade?
    >
    >Is it the exposure to strong light such as sunlight the causes a
    >inkjet photo to fade. Do photos kept in photo albums still fade?
    >
    >Regards Brian
    >
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article
    <428b111c$0$27625$61c65585@un-2park-reader-02.sydney.pipenetworks.com.au>,
    caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com (Caitlin) wrote:

    > > I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade...

    > All of the above.

    Plus ozone and gas fumes. Keeping prints in the kitchen will fade them
    even faster.

    Jon.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    > I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    > so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?

    Probably but so might smearing it with sun tan cream to block the UV. I
    wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    CWatters wrote:

    >"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?

    I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    affects prints.

    Placing photos in an album that blocks out light and keeps the photo
    under a layer of plastic should add decades to the life of a print.

    >wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.

    The only problem with that is if the photo is given to someone else, as
    some people may not keep the original data file.

    For instance, many of my casual shots at parties or other social events
    are not kept. I just print photos off for people and that's it. Of
    course the really good keepers I'll keep forever.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    For preventing the photo fading, I am using Photo2DVD for preserving my
    favorite photographs to DVD, and making a nice slideshow on TV with
    music, transitions and all the DVD menus created automatically.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "CWatters" <colin.watters@pandoraBOX.be> wrote:

    >
    >"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    >> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >
    >Probably but so might smearing it with sun tan cream to block the UV. I
    >wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >
    I can't help wondering if fading photos is an advantage to
    manufactures as I'm going to use more ink in re-printing photos so I
    have to buy more ink cartridges.

    Regards Brian
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Thu, 19 May 2005 20:57:36 +1200, Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

    >"CWatters" <colin.watters@pandoraBOX.be> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    >>> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>
    >>Probably but so might smearing it with sun tan cream to block the UV. I
    >>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>
    >I can't help wondering if fading photos is an advantage to
    >manufactures as I'm going to use more ink in re-printing photos so I
    >have to buy more ink cartridges.
    >
    >Regards Brian

    Well, that answers why Canon make a lot of profit on their printers
    ;-)

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Bill wrote:

    >CWatters wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>
    >>
    >>>I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>>so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>>
    >>>
    >
    >I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    >affects prints.
    >
    >

    A paper supplier told me that ozone is the major culprit in fading.

    >Placing photos in an album that blocks out light and keeps the photo
    >under a layer of plastic should add decades to the life of a print.
    >
    >
    >
    >>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >The only problem with that is if the photo is given to someone else, as
    >some people may not keep the original data file.
    >
    >For instance, many of my casual shots at parties or other social events
    >are not kept. I just print photos off for people and that's it. Of
    >course the really good keepers I'll keep forever.
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:k4lo819m0g9i2oem6harekfqseqh8tp1pg@4ax.com...
    > I can't help wondering if fading photos is an advantage to
    > manufactures as I'm going to use more ink in re-printing photos so I
    > have to buy more ink cartridges.

    :-) Well the don't fade that fast.

    I've given dye prints to family members and they've lasted 5 years behind
    glass with no obvious fading yet.. Certainly they aren't bad enough yet to
    need reprinting. My mother has one in a humid bathroom (it's actually stuck
    to the outside of the shower door!) and that's three years old at least.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Bill <bill@c.a> wrote:

    >CWatters wrote:
    >
    >>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >
    >I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    >affects prints.
    >
    >Placing photos in an album that blocks out light and keeps the photo
    >under a layer of plastic should add decades to the life of a print.
    >
    >>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >
    >The only problem with that is if the photo is given to someone else, as
    >some people may not keep the original data file.
    >
    >For instance, many of my casual shots at parties or other social events
    >are not kept. I just print photos off for people and that's it. Of
    >course the really good keepers I'll keep forever.

    The only way to prevent losing a photo due to age is to scan it into
    the computer and save it as a file (if you don't have the original
    file).
    I have a feeling that prints on printing paper will be replaced by
    electronic portable photo albums that have a 6 x 4 inch or larger view
    screen and can be hand held. Similar to viewing an ebook. I sometimes
    like to show my photos on TV as a slide show that way everyone can see
    them and the picture is larger to view.

    Regards Brian
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    <lookaaly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1116556927.113368.192680@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > For preventing the photo fading, I am using Photo2DVD for preserving my
    > favorite photographs to DVD, and making a nice slideshow on TV with
    > music, transitions and all the DVD menus created automatically.
    >

    And how are you preserving your DVDs?
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Brian wrote:

    >Bill <bill@c.a> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>CWatters wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>>>so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    >>affects prints.
    >>
    >>Placing photos in an album that blocks out light and keeps the photo
    >>under a layer of plastic should add decades to the life of a print.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>The only problem with that is if the photo is given to someone else, as
    >>some people may not keep the original data file.
    >>
    >>For instance, many of my casual shots at parties or other social events
    >>are not kept. I just print photos off for people and that's it. Of
    >>course the really good keepers I'll keep forever.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >The only way to prevent losing a photo due to age is to scan it into
    >the computer and save it as a file (if you don't have the original
    >file).
    >I have a feeling that prints on printing paper will be replaced by
    >electronic portable photo albums that have a 6 x 4 inch or larger view
    >screen and can be hand held. Similar to viewing an ebook. I sometimes
    >like to show my photos on TV as a slide show that way everyone can see
    >them and the picture is larger to view.
    >
    >Regards Brian
    >
    >

    And do you suppose you will buy a few dozen of these "eBooks" , frame
    them, and hand them on a wall? =-O
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:k4lo819m0g9i2oem6harekfqseqh8tp1pg@4ax.com...
    > "CWatters" <colin.watters@pandoraBOX.be> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    >>> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>
    >>Probably but so might smearing it with sun tan cream to block the UV. I
    >>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>
    > I can't help wondering if fading photos is an advantage to
    > manufactures as I'm going to use more ink in re-printing photos so I
    > have to buy more ink cartridges.
    >
    > Regards Brian

    I don't think they think that far into the future! It's simply harder to
    make inks that don't fade, and always have been. The reported increasing in
    clogging of pigment inks is an example of a trade off that is required to
    try to get more permanent images.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 20 May 2005 13:20:24 +1200, Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

    >The only way to prevent losing a photo due to age is to scan it into
    >the computer and save it as a file (if you don't have the original
    >file).
    >I have a feeling that prints on printing paper will be replaced by
    >electronic portable photo albums that have a 6 x 4 inch or larger view
    >screen and can be hand held. Similar to viewing an ebook. I sometimes
    >like to show my photos on TV as a slide show that way everyone can see
    >them and the picture is larger to view.
    >
    There's already a couple of "image cubes" that can do just that. Load
    them up with a number of imagers and get a random selection or
    whatever...

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 20 May 2005 14:56:54 +1000, "Caitlin"
    <caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    ><lookaaly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >news:1116556927.113368.192680@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >> For preventing the photo fading, I am using Photo2DVD for preserving my
    >> favorite photographs to DVD, and making a nice slideshow on TV with
    >> music, transitions and all the DVD menus created automatically.
    >>
    >
    >And how are you preserving your DVDs?
    >
    Well, I can't speak for the OP, but I used to have everything on CD,
    and on firewire drives. Now it's all on DVD and firewire drives and
    the DVDs are checked and recopied regardless after three years. And
    when the next format becomes a mass system (I.e. when HD DVD and Blue
    Ray become one format, even if it's a different one) I shall buy a
    writer and move from DVD to whichever format is next. Storage is
    cheap ;-)

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:20:17 GMT, measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
    wrote:


    >
    >And do you suppose you will buy a few dozen of these "eBooks" , frame
    >them, and hand them on a wall? =-O

    More fool you then - there are already "image cubes" for desktop use
    selling for about £300 which will load up a number of images and
    display them in a sequence or randomly. And there are screens already
    developed with are thin and can be folded even, and would be ideal for
    hanging on the wall. A simple wireless connection to your household
    server/ P|C or whatever you use for computing, will enable you to
    change images and have what you like hanging on the wall. You really
    need to keep up with the technology...

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    And if you want an art gallery in your home you will have to buy a 100
    of these.

    Hecate wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:20:17 GMT, measekite <measekite@yahoo.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>And do you suppose you will buy a few dozen of these "eBooks" , frame
    >>them, and hand them on a wall? =-O
    >>
    >>
    >
    >More fool you then - there are already "image cubes" for desktop use
    >selling for about £300 which will load up a number of images and
    >display them in a sequence or randomly. And there are screens already
    >developed with are thin and can be folded even, and would be ideal for
    >hanging on the wall. A simple wireless connection to your household
    >server/ P|C or whatever you use for computing, will enable you to
    >change images and have what you like hanging on the wall. You really
    >need to keep up with the technology...
    >
    > --
    >
    >Hecate - The Real One
    >Hecate@newsguy.com
    >Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    >you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
    >
    >
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Hecate" <hecate@newsguy.com> wrote in message
    news:afls81l9m5gu5d470pec1ehjjf2vt60l49@4ax.com...
    > On Fri, 20 May 2005 14:56:54 +1000, "Caitlin"
    > <caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >><lookaaly@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1116556927.113368.192680@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >>> For preventing the photo fading, I am using Photo2DVD for preserving my
    >>> favorite photographs to DVD, and making a nice slideshow on TV with
    >>> music, transitions and all the DVD menus created automatically.
    >>>
    >>
    >>And how are you preserving your DVDs?
    >>
    > Well, I can't speak for the OP, but I used to have everything on CD,
    > and on firewire drives. Now it's all on DVD and firewire drives and
    > the DVDs are checked and recopied regardless after three years. And
    > when the next format becomes a mass system (I.e. when HD DVD and Blue
    > Ray become one format, even if it's a different one) I shall buy a
    > writer and move from DVD to whichever format is next. Storage is
    > cheap ;-)
    >
    > --


    Good - I just hope everyone is as thorough as you.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ozone is a reducing agent (bleach) and as such can cause fading. But it
    depends upon the ink and the paper involved. Microporous papers tend to
    be more easily harmed by ozone than swellable polymers.

    But, again, it all depends upon the inks. Even air current across the
    paper surface can be enough to cause fading of some inks, especially
    light dye load inks. Cyan seems to be more vulnerable than other dyes,
    for some reason.

    Art

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Bill wrote:
    >
    >> CWatters wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>>> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>>>
    >>
    >>
    >> I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    >> affects prints.
    >>
    >>
    >
    > A paper supplier told me that ozone is the major culprit in fading.
    >
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    DVD-R or CD-R are great for making slide shows, but how long they will
    last is the million dollar question, just like the inks, DVD-R and CD-R
    use dyes, which do indeed fade or degrade over time. SOme last months,
    others years, and others possibly decades or centuries.

    Also, the question of what will read the disks 10, 20 50 years from now
    is hard to know. Try finding a working 8" floppy drive somewhere.

    Art

    lookaaly@yahoo.com wrote:

    > For preventing the photo fading, I am using Photo2DVD for preserving my
    > favorite photographs to DVD, and making a nice slideshow on TV with
    > music, transitions and all the DVD menus created automatically.
    >
  22. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >Brian wrote:
    >
    >>Bill <bill@c.a> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>CWatters wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>>>>so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>I believe exposure to UV light is the biggest issue, but air/ozone also
    >>>affects prints.
    >>>
    >>>Placing photos in an album that blocks out light and keeps the photo
    >>>under a layer of plastic should add decades to the life of a print.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>The only problem with that is if the photo is given to someone else, as
    >>>some people may not keep the original data file.
    >>>
    >>>For instance, many of my casual shots at parties or other social events
    >>>are not kept. I just print photos off for people and that's it. Of
    >>>course the really good keepers I'll keep forever.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>The only way to prevent losing a photo due to age is to scan it into
    >>the computer and save it as a file (if you don't have the original
    >>file).
    >>I have a feeling that prints on printing paper will be replaced by
    >>electronic portable photo albums that have a 6 x 4 inch or larger view
    >>screen and can be hand held. Similar to viewing an ebook. I sometimes
    >>like to show my photos on TV as a slide show that way everyone can see
    >>them and the picture is larger to view.
    >>
    >>Regards Brian
    >>
    >>
    >
    >And do you suppose you will buy a few dozen of these "eBooks" , frame
    >them, and hand them on a wall? =-O

    They are PORTABLE devices not designed to hang on the wall. Ideal when
    visiting a friend that wants to see your holiday photos.
    It's possible to mount a thin flat screen TV on the wall so it's just
    a matter of time when electronic photos will be mounted on walls. You
    would then have a choice of a slide show of photos or you could change
    the mood of the room by electronically changing the photos on the
    wall.
    We are living in the technlogical age where anything is possible.

    Regards Brian
  23. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Caitlin" <caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >news:k4lo819m0g9i2oem6harekfqseqh8tp1pg@4ax.com...
    >> "CWatters" <colin.watters@pandoraBOX.be> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    >>>news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    >>>> I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    >>>> so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >>>
    >>>Probably but so might smearing it with sun tan cream to block the UV. I
    >>>wouldn't do either. Just print a new one when the old one fades.
    >>>
    >> I can't help wondering if fading photos is an advantage to
    >> manufactures as I'm going to use more ink in re-printing photos so I
    >> have to buy more ink cartridges.
    >>
    >> Regards Brian
    >
    >I don't think they think that far into the future! It's simply harder to
    >make inks that don't fade, and always have been. The reported increasing in
    >clogging of pigment inks is an example of a trade off that is required to
    >try to get more permanent images.
    >
    Evertime someone says that I look at some photos I printed on a old HP
    inkjet printer on plain paper that has been on the wall for over 10
    years. There is no sign of fading. It must be with the more recent
    inks used that fading has been a problem.

    Regards Brian
  24. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sat, 21 May 2005 08:07:42 +1000, "Caitlin"
    <caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:


    >>>And how are you preserving your DVDs?
    >>>
    >> Well, I can't speak for the OP, but I used to have everything on CD,
    >> and on firewire drives. Now it's all on DVD and firewire drives and
    >> the DVDs are checked and recopied regardless after three years. And
    >> when the next format becomes a mass system (I.e. when HD DVD and Blue
    >> Ray become one format, even if it's a different one) I shall buy a
    >> writer and move from DVD to whichever format is next. Storage is
    >> cheap ;-)
    >>
    >> --
    >
    >
    >Good - I just hope everyone is as thorough as you.
    >
    Yeah right ;-)

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  25. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
    news:dp2m81hppsdm95fnurm01cqp3o6fdldhi8@4ax.com...
    > I'm wondering why inkjet photos fade is it the ink exposure to air, if
    > so then can a laminated photo stop the fading?
    >
    > Is it the chemical mix of ink on the photo paper, maybe some photo
    > papers are better than others. If you were to print on plain paper
    > then would the photo still fade?
    >
    > Is it the exposure to strong light such as sunlight the causes a
    > inkjet photo to fade. Do photos kept in photo albums still fade?

    Henry Wilhelm has a website at http://www.wilhelm-research.com/ that documents
    a wide number of articles on light fade and other fade mechanisms. You can
    download his 700+ page book at http://www.wilhelm-research.com/book_toc.html
    (free) or study some of the numerous articles.

    The short answer - paper, ink, light and air all matter.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
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