Updating from 98 to XP

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
new OS?
I need to update from 98 to XP to run my ipod. I don't
suppose anyone knows another way around this?
Thanks,
Ben
15 answers Last reply
More about updating
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:0b2001c4abb0$61d5c590$a401280a@phx.gbl,
    Ben <benbright@netvigator.com> typed:

    > Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
    > question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
    > Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
    > programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
    > they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
    > new OS?


    By definition, an "upgrade" (as opposed to a clean installation)
    means that all data, programs, etc. are kept intact.


    However there are no guarantees that it always works perfectly.
    However unlikely, it's always possible that something might go
    wrong. For that reason it's prudent to be sure you have a backup
    of anything you can't afford to lose before beginning.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    > If I update my operating system from 98 to XP Home ...

    How much RAM do you have?
    My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.
    Rgds, JohnH
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    First insert the XP cd in your drive and run the compatibility checker to
    make sure what you already have is compatible with XP.

    "Ben" <benbright@netvigator.com> wrote in message
    news:0b2001c4abb0$61d5c590$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    > Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
    > question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
    > Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
    > programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
    > they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
    > new OS?
    > I need to update from 98 to XP to run my ipod. I don't
    > suppose anyone knows another way around this?
    > Thanks,
    > Ben
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23PvlSa8qEHA.536@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
    John Herbster <no-swen@no-swen.com> typed:

    >> If I update my operating system from 98 to XP Home ...
    >
    > How much RAM do you have?
    > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.


    As always, how much RAM you need depends on what apps you run,
    but for most people running a mix of common business
    applications, 256MB is adequate. If your machine is running very
    slowly with 256 MB, I would look elsewhere for your problems:
    slow processor, spyware, viruses, or performance-robbing
    background programs starting automatically.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Upgrading to XP can go very well for some and can really be a
    disaster for others. You should make absolutely certain that you have made a
    backup of your important data first. This can not be over emphasised. While
    most well thought out upgrades are problem free no major upgrade like this
    can be 100% perfect so BACKUP. In my opinion it is preferable to make a full
    system image of your setup using a product like Acronis TrueImage or
    Norton Ghost (or other imaging program). That way if things really go wrong
    you can quickly revert back to your old setup to either try again or live
    with.

    There are a number of first things to do before upgrading.
    1)You need to ensure that you have XP drivers for your hardware. If you
    install this little freeware app it will tell you a lot about your hardware
    and direct you to downloads
    http://www.lavalys.com/products/overview.php?pid=1&lang=en Make certain that
    you have drivers for your motherboard, network card or modem. You may need
    to get on line ASAP after the upgrade.

    2) Windows XP has an Upgrade Advisor on the CD. You should run that before
    upgrading and heed the report it generates. You can download the Advisor
    from here but it is very large so be forewarned
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/upgrading/advisor.mspx

    3) I suggest that if you have a high speed connection you should download
    SP2 and copy to CD. You can get the full version of it here
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=049c9dbe-3b8e-4f30-8245-9e368d3cdb5a&displaylang=en

    4) Run anti-spyware programs like CWShredder, Ad-Aware or SpyBot Search &
    Destroy etc and do a virus scan. http://aumha.org/win5/a/parasite.htm

    5) Prior to running the upgrade you must do some serious disk cleanup and
    maintenance work. The first thing to do is to uninstall some programs that
    will cause problems for you later if not uninstalled first. You can later
    reinstall them if they are supported in XP. a) You must uninstall all CD
    Writing software - (Easy CD Creator, Direct CD, Nero, InCD etc) Look for
    upgrades before reinstalling in XP.
    b) Uninstall any third party disk management tools like Norton SystemWorks,
    GoBack, System Mechanic or the like. These can be reinstalled after the
    upgrade.
    c) Uninstall any Antivirus software and any Firewall software you have
    installed. These can be reinstalled after the upgrade.
    d) Reset any tweaking programs you've used like Tweakui to their defaults
    and then remove the application
    e) Ensure that you have the installation files or CDs handy for your
    currently installed apps. Many programs make the transition fine but others
    will need to be reinstalled again after the upgrade.
    f) Do a decent cleanup, dump temp files, empty the recycle bin,
    g) Run defrag.

    The above should render your system in decent shape for an upgrade

    6) Unplug unnecessary peripherals like scanners, printers, cameras and the
    like.

    7) Reboot to the desktop and pop the XP CD into the drive. Select
    Install->Upgrade [recommended] and let the games begin.

    8) When the install completes you will be asked if you want to Activate.
    Choose Not at this time. You really need to finish the setup and ensure that
    your hardware is supported before Activating.

    9) You don't want to go online until you've enabled the Firewall. In fact
    you may wish to temporarily disconnect your internet by pulling the cable.
    Do this to avoid contracting the Blaster or Sasser Worm virus.

    10) Install SP2 from the download you saved and finally install your
    Antivirus software.

    Good Luck. More info here
    Upgrade info http://www.aumha.org/a/xpupgrad.htm
    Clean Install info http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/clean_install.htm
    Windows Product Activation http://www.aumha.org/a/wpa.htm
    Service Pack 2 info
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?pr=windowsxpsp2
    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "Ben" <benbright@netvigator.com> wrote in message
    news:0b2001c4abb0$61d5c590$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    | Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
    | question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
    | Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
    | programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
    | they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
    | new OS?
    | I need to update from 98 to XP to run my ipod. I don't
    | suppose anyone knows another way around this?
    | Thanks,
    | Ben
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Ben" <benbright@netvigator.com> wrote in message
    news:0b2001c4abb0$61d5c590$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    > Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
    > question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
    > Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
    > programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
    > they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
    > new OS?
    > I need to update from 98 to XP to run my ipod. I don't
    > suppose anyone knows another way around this?
    > Thanks,
    > Ben

    Hi Ben

    Not tried it myself, but there's info and an app here that apparently lets
    you use an ipod under win98:

    http://www.vonnieda.org/vPod/

    Kline
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    > > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.

    "Ken Blake" wrote

    > As always, how much RAM you need depends on what
    > apps you run,

    Right after boot up, if I bring up one copy of File Explorer
    and delete a small file like a lnk or empty directory folder,
    it can take 10 to 20 seconds with a lot of disk activity and
    little CPU activity.

    > but for most people running a mix of common business
    > applications, 256MB is adequate. If your machine is running
    > very slowly with 256 MB, I would look elsewhere for your
    > problems: slow processor, spyware, viruses, or

    > performance-robbing background programs starting
    > automatically.

    How do I identify which of the 45 background processes are
    not supposed to be running?

    TIA, JohnH
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23eKDoX$qEHA.2732@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    John Herbster <no-swen@no-swen.com> typed:

    >> > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.
    >
    > "Ken Blake" wrote
    >
    >> As always, how much RAM you need depends on what
    >> apps you run,
    >
    > Right after boot up, if I bring up one copy of File Explorer
    > and delete a small file like a lnk or empty directory folder,
    > it can take 10 to 20 seconds with a lot of disk activity and
    > little CPU activity.


    That sound like either you have performance-robbing background
    programs loading automatically, or, more likely, that you are
    infested with spyware.

    Do you regularly run at least two of the standard anti-spyware
    programs? I personally use Spyware Blaster, Adaware, and Spyware
    Search and Destroy.


    >
    >> but for most people running a mix of common business
    >> applications, 256MB is adequate. If your machine is running
    >> very slowly with 256 MB, I would look elsewhere for your
    >> problems: slow processor, spyware, viruses, or
    >
    >> performance-robbing background programs starting
    >> automatically.
    >
    > How do I identify which of the 45 background processes are
    > not supposed to be running?


    You can post their names here for more information, but I doubt
    whether that's your problem. Spyware is much more likely.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Ben wrote:
    > Hi - Wonder if anyone can help me with a very basic
    > question: If I update my operating system from 98 to XP
    > Home edition, do I need to save all my current files and
    > programs seperately to save them from being lost or will
    > they be automatically kept on my hard drive as part of the
    > new OS?
    > I need to update from 98 to XP to run my ipod. I don't
    > suppose anyone knows another way around this?
    > Thanks,
    > Ben


    WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things
    can go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all
    important to you, back it up before proceeding.

    Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are capable
    of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
    manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
    Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
    hardware components or applications.

    You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
    there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
    components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
    Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
    with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
    hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many
    models in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's
    consumer-class Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K
    before it, is quite sensitive to borderline defective or substandard
    hardware (particularly motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will
    still support Win9x.

    HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639

    Upgrading to Windows XP
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm

    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
    having
    both at once. - RAH
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    > >> > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.

    > >> As always, how much RAM you need depends on what
    > >> apps you run,

    > > Right after boot up, if I bring up one copy of File Explorer
    > > and delete a small file like a lnk or empty directory folder,
    > > it can take 10 to 20 seconds with a lot of disk activity and
    > > little CPU activity.

    > That sound like either you have performance-robbing
    > background programs loading automatically, or, more likely,
    > that you are infested with spyware.
    > Do you regularly run at least two of the standard anti-spyware
    > programs?

    No. However, I just ran Ad-Aware and Spybot S&D w/o
    seeing any improvement.

    > >> ... If your machine is running very slowly with 256 MB,
    > >> I would look ... for slow processor, spyware, viruses, or
    > >> performance-robbing background programs starting
    > >> automatically.

    > > How do I identify which of the 45 background processes
    > > are not supposed to be running?

    > You can post their names here for more information,
    > but I doubt whether that's your problem. Spyware ...

    Do any of the following look suspicious?
    Processes WinXP Pro SP2 2004-10-07a
    -----
    alg LOCAL
    Apache SYSTEM
    Apache SYSTEM
    ati2evxx SYSTEM
    atiptaxx
    BacsTray
    BCMWLTRY SYSTEM
    carpserv
    CIDAEMON SYSTEM
    CIDAEMON SYSTEM
    cisvc SYSTEM
    csrss SYSTEM
    DadApp
    dadtray
    Directcd
    DSentry
    explorer
    hpztsb07
    lsass SYSTEM
    mcagent
    McShield SYSTEM
    mcvsrte SYSTEM
    mcvsshld
    mdm SYSTEM
    notepad
    services SYSTEM
    smss SYSTEM
    spoolsv SYSTEM
    Support SYSTEM
    svchost SYSTEM
    svchost NETWORK SERVICE
    svchost SYSTEM
    svchost NETWORK SERVICE
    svchost LOCAL SERVICE
    svchost
    SynTPEnh
    SynTPLpr
    System
    System Idle Process
    taskmgr
    winlogon SYSTEM
    WLTRYSVC SYSTEM
    wscntfy
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    > >> > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.

    I normally run this computer w/o a network connection.
    Would that be likely to cause operations like deletes
    and dropdowns of comboboxes to be very slow?
    --JohnH
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    John I see you have CIDAEMON running. That's the "Content Indexing Daemon",
    a background process that builds a fast search index of the files on your
    computer. Chances are you don't need it, and can disable the indexing
    service. Right click your Hard Drive icon(s) while in My Computer and select
    Properties. At the bottom of the General Tab you should see a check box for
    Indexing services. Uncheck the box and click Apply then on the next window
    that pops up check to have it Apply to C and all subfolders and files. If a
    box pops open while the changes are being made choose to Ignore All.
    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "John Herbster" <no-swen@no-swen.com> wrote in message
    news:%232l4TjHrEHA.1036@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    | > >> > My XP Pro is running very slowly with 256 MB.
    |
    | > >> As always, how much RAM you need depends on what
    | > >> apps you run,
    |
    | > > Right after boot up, if I bring up one copy of File Explorer
    | > > and delete a small file like a lnk or empty directory folder,
    | > > it can take 10 to 20 seconds with a lot of disk activity and
    | > > little CPU activity.
    |
    | > That sound like either you have performance-robbing
    | > background programs loading automatically, or, more likely,
    | > that you are infested with spyware.
    | > Do you regularly run at least two of the standard anti-spyware
    | > programs?
    |
    | No. However, I just ran Ad-Aware and Spybot S&D w/o
    | seeing any improvement.
    |
    | > >> ... If your machine is running very slowly with 256 MB,
    | > >> I would look ... for slow processor, spyware, viruses, or
    | > >> performance-robbing background programs starting
    | > >> automatically.
    |
    | > > How do I identify which of the 45 background processes
    | > > are not supposed to be running?
    |
    | > You can post their names here for more information,
    | > but I doubt whether that's your problem. Spyware ...
    |
    | Do any of the following look suspicious?
    | Processes WinXP Pro SP2 2004-10-07a
    | -----
    | alg LOCAL
    | Apache SYSTEM
    | Apache SYSTEM
    | ati2evxx SYSTEM
    | atiptaxx
    | BacsTray
    | BCMWLTRY SYSTEM
    | carpserv
    | CIDAEMON SYSTEM
    | CIDAEMON SYSTEM
    | cisvc SYSTEM
    | csrss SYSTEM
    | DadApp
    | dadtray
    | Directcd
    | DSentry
    | explorer
    | hpztsb07
    | lsass SYSTEM
    | mcagent
    | McShield SYSTEM
    | mcvsrte SYSTEM
    | mcvsshld
    | mdm SYSTEM
    | notepad
    | services SYSTEM
    | smss SYSTEM
    | spoolsv SYSTEM
    | Support SYSTEM
    | svchost SYSTEM
    | svchost NETWORK SERVICE
    | svchost SYSTEM
    | svchost NETWORK SERVICE
    | svchost LOCAL SERVICE
    | svchost
    | SynTPEnh
    | SynTPLpr
    | System
    | System Idle Process
    | taskmgr
    | winlogon SYSTEM
    | WLTRYSVC SYSTEM
    | wscntfy
    |
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote

    > ... you have CIDAEMON running. That's the "Content
    > Indexing Daemon", a background process that builds a
    > fast search index of the files on your computer.
    > Chances are you don't need it, and can disable the
    > indexing service.

    Harry,

    Thanks for the suggestion. You forgot to mention
    that it would take a while. It finished in 47 minutes.

    Now, right-clicking on My computer and selecting
    Search on C-drive required 20 seconds to bring
    up the search selection screen.
    Deleting a small file took 7 seconds.

    Rebooting showed the same slow performance.

    Interestingly though, when the file was deleted from
    the result screen of a Search. It disappeared
    immediately from the search window, but it took
    10 seconds for the delete progress box to close-up.

    --JohnH
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote

    > John I see you have CIDAEMON running.
    > That's the "Content Indexing Daemon", ...

    Harry,

    I followed you directions and cleared the Allow Indexing
    Service check box and did the Apply. Before this, there
    were two CIDAEMON processes, then after the cleanup
    *none*, and now after a couple of reboots there is one
    CIDAEMON .EXE running again. The Allow Indexing
    is still *unchecked*. Why did it start again?

    I notice that "cisvc.exe" process is also now present.
    Googling found
    http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP/Q_20585121.html
    which says that cisvc is also part of the indexing service.

    There are three copies of CIDAEMON.EXE file on the HD.
    One in C:\I386, another in C:\Windows\System32; and
    something named CIDAEMON.EXE-01BEEBF3.pf in
    C:\Windows\Prefetch.

    System is still slow. Any more suggestions?

    Rgds, JohnH
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "John Herbster" <no-swen@no-swen.com> wrote in message
    news:%23aBwzFKrEHA.1296@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    |
    | "Harry Ohrn" <harry---@webtree.ca> wrote
    |
    | > ... you have CIDAEMON running. That's the "Content
    | > Indexing Daemon", a background process that builds a
    | > fast search index of the files on your computer.
    | > Chances are you don't need it, and can disable the
    | > indexing service.
    |
    | Harry,
    |
    | Thanks for the suggestion. You forgot to mention
    | that it would take a while. It finished in 47 minutes.
    |
    | Now, right-clicking on My computer and selecting
    | Search on C-drive required 20 seconds to bring
    | up the search selection screen.
    | Deleting a small file took 7 seconds.
    |
    | Rebooting showed the same slow performance.
    |
    | Interestingly though, when the file was deleted from
    | the result screen of a Search. It disappeared
    | immediately from the search window, but it took
    | 10 seconds for the delete progress box to close-up.
    |
    | --JohnH

    Actually I didn't forget to mention how long it would take. It takes 5
    minutes on my system to disable indexing services and I have no idea how
    long it might take on someone else's system as it really depends on your
    system specs and how many files you have on your system to clear.

    If you haven't already done so you can
    1) Run CHKDSK /F
    2) Run Disk Cleanup
    3) Run Defrag
    4)Turn off unnecessary eye-candy
    5)You can try dumping the contents of the C:/Windows/Prefectch folder and
    see what that does. Prefetch is supposed to speed things up but I've heard
    that in some instances it can be a problem
    6)Try going into MSCONFIG->Startup Tab and clear all the boxes then reboot.
    then go to MSCONFIG and gradually begin adding items back to see if you can
    isolate the problem

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
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