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Best case with wheels and other requirements

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July 26, 2006 5:49:23 AM

I need a case for an Intel D975XBX motherboard. Requirements are as follows:

1. Has wheels or rollers.
2. Opens on the standard side.
3. Does not have a door covering the external drive bays.
4. Hard drive bays are perpendicular to the case.
6. At least 6 hard drive bays.
7. Hard drive bays and external bays are metal, not plastic.
8. At least 3 5.25" external bays and at least one 3.5".

I was all set to buy a Lian Li 1200B until I realized it opens on the opposite side, which won't work since I am in a corner desk and that side is against the wall! I know I can add wheels by using stick-ons. drilling, etc, but I would rather use one designed with wheels.
July 26, 2006 6:24:26 AM

look in the lian Li's there should be something that fix those requirements. Lian Li's are the only ones which have wheels (that i know of)
July 26, 2006 7:35:37 AM

To my knowledge, all the wheeled cases from Lian Li are "upside down" and open to your right instead of your left.
Related resources
July 26, 2006 4:13:58 PM

Quote:
I'm assuming that you are looking for a mid atx? Not full tower?

Why don't you just pick the case you want without wheels then add these

http://www.frozencpu.com/cpa-17.html

Otherwise try the Tai Chi

http://www.frozencpu.com/cst-308.html

And the doors for most cases are not a big issue as they can be removed very easily, I did that with my Armor.


Silly little Waylander. the Tai Chi would cripple a desk in a few hours.
July 26, 2006 4:42:06 PM

Quote:
I'm assuming that you are looking for a mid atx? Not full tower?

Why don't you just pick the case you want without wheels then add these

http://www.frozencpu.com/cpa-17.html

Otherwise try the Tai Chi

http://www.frozencpu.com/cst-308.html

And the doors for most cases are not a big issue as they can be removed very easily, I did that with my Armor.


Silly little Waylander. the Tai Chi would cripple a desk in a few hours.

I don't know, maybe he has a steel desk, he didn't list a weight requirement so....
July 26, 2006 5:14:10 PM

Quote:
I'm assuming that you are looking for a mid atx? Not full tower?

Why don't you just pick the case you want without wheels then add these

http://www.frozencpu.com/cpa-17.html

Otherwise try the Tai Chi

http://www.frozencpu.com/cst-308.html

And the doors for most cases are not a big issue as they can be removed very easily, I did that with my Armor.


Silly little Waylander. the Tai Chi would cripple a desk in a few hours.


I don't know, maybe he has a steel desk, he didn't list a weight requirement so....

lol
July 26, 2006 5:36:05 PM

Quote:
I need a case for an Intel D975XBX motherboard. Requirements are as follows:

1. Has wheels or rollers.
2. Opens on the standard side.
3. Does not have a door covering the external drive bays.
4. Hard drive bays are perpendicular to the case.
6. At least 6 hard drive bays.
7. Hard drive bays and external bays are metal, not plastic.
8. At least 3 5.25" external bays and at least one 3.5".


http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php?main_p...

Just have them add casters to it. Or buy one somewhere else, drill some holes in the bottom, and do it yourself.
July 26, 2006 5:38:08 PM

Quote:
look in the lian Li's there should be something that fix those requirements. Lian Li's are the only ones which have wheels (that i know of)


Zalman case: This one has wheels too but must weigh 10x what the Tai Chi weighs and also doesn't cover all the specs that this guy want but hey just some info i guess... :) 
July 26, 2006 9:45:54 PM

While the case itself is overkill for someone who is not going to water cool, I love the hydraulic opening side doors on the Thai Chi!

One slight change to my specs - I only need 5 internal drive bays. That should add a few more options.

The only Lian Li cases that come with 5+ perpendicular internal drive bays are the ones that open the wrong way (1000, 1100, 1200, 2000, etc). I looked at every Lian Li case on their web site, so even finding a Lian Li without wheels and adding them isn't an option.
July 26, 2006 10:22:05 PM

You still haven't said whether you want full tower or mid?

the best i can find is the Sonata II



There is space for 4 but you might be able to stick one in the very bottom somehow. Just add wheels to it and you're happy.
July 26, 2006 10:35:15 PM

I've decided to use teflon feet instead, so I am removing the wheels requirement. Update:

1. Opens on the standard side (your left).
2. At least 5 internal hard drive bays.
3. Hard drive bays are perpendicular to the case.
4. Hard drive bays and external bays are metal, not plastic.
5. Does not have a door covering the external drive bays.
6. At least 3 5.25" external bays and at least one 3.5".
7. Toll-less installation for all drive bays. Mounting to clips or drawers with screws is ok.
8. Motherboard tray is desired but not required.
9. Either mid-tower (preferred) or full tower (still ok)

Thanks,

-Mike
July 26, 2006 11:01:23 PM

Those bays are not perpendicular. Perpendicular internal bays (like in the Sonata II) are important.

Thanks,

-Mke
July 27, 2006 11:21:41 AM

Why does it matter whether the drives are perpendicular or not? Enlighten me.
July 27, 2006 11:39:38 AM

1. Perp bays make it much easier to insert and remove drives.
2. Perp bays make it much easier to hookup and disconnect drives.
3. It allows for neater cable routing (without everything hanging over the motherboard).
4. I don't like pulling drives out of their bay over the motherboard, risking dropping a drive on the motherboard (if flat) or on a card (if standing). That would be bad.
5. Depending on the case layout and cards, with the old style bays you may have to remove cards in order to remove drives! Or you may have to pull out the whole bay cage to insert or remove a drive.

I move drives around a lot and it just makes that task so much easier and less error prone. Once I had a case with perpendicular bays I never wanted to go back to the old fashioned bays. I worked on a friend's Dell recently and killed a lot of time having to remove cages in order to move drives. A pain. Not for me. I use perpendicular bays in all my cases!
July 27, 2006 11:52:32 AM

I'm not sure what you mean by "perpendicular" drive mounting, but the Zalman TNN500AF case meets most of your needs, and is also silent. I had five hard disks in mine at one point, along with the optical drive. It's very well made, weighs a ton, comes with wheels, is easy to work on (drives mount on shelves, which slip onto bolt heads that you loosen from the outside). It does have a door on the front, but that's no big deal. It has a push-to-open latch on it. What I really like about this case is that everything fits perfectly. You don't have to push things around to get the latches to line up. And that it's silent. Makes it a very good desk neighbor. It's expensive, but when the time comes to upgrade you just put in a new motherboard.
July 27, 2006 11:56:04 AM

$1100 is way too expensive for my blood. I can go up to $300 for an awesome case.

Perpendicular = drives insert sideways to the case. Look at the case photo above of the Sonata II and you will see.
July 27, 2006 1:12:15 PM

Quote:
3. It allows for neater cable routing (without everything hanging over the motherboard).


I just buy SATA cables of the right length and they end up ultra neat. You can buy them in 2" increments. You can find round IDE cables in many different lengths too.

If moving HDs often is a big issue, then I'd get something that has lockable front-access hot swappable SATA bays. No door issue, no way to drop onto the mobo, etc. Lia Li sells them as options and I've seen them at CompUSA and on many sites.
July 27, 2006 9:29:31 PM

I got talked out of the wheels, but you're not going to talk me out of the perpendicular drive bays. There are many good reasons you find them in higher-end cases. I listed a few. I have a couple external SATA trays. I still need 5 internal bays. For one thing, each external tray adds another small fan.
July 28, 2006 12:08:18 AM

Quote:
I got talked out of the wheels, but you're not going to talk me out of the perpendicular drive bays. There are many good reasons you find them in higher-end cases. I listed a few. I have a couple external SATA trays. I still need 5 internal bays. For one thing, each external tray adds another small fan.


I'm not talking about external trays. I'm talking about this kind of thing. But don't worry, I would never try to talk you out of your beloved perpendicular bays, even though the one I just linked is FAR more convenient...
July 28, 2006 12:19:20 AM

Yes, I know. I use two of those already. Sure I could populate a whole tower with those, one of those towers where all the bays can be either external or internal, but that would only alleviate 1 of my issues, ignoring all the others, and it would add 5 small noisy fans to the system. It would also add $200. I don't move drives around THAT often.

There are a lot of systems that meet my other requirements but have a door in front of the external drives, so I may just have to get one of those and remove the door, even though it looks lame that way.
July 28, 2006 12:37:06 AM

Picky, picky, picky. Get a Lian Li full tower and be happy.
July 28, 2006 1:27:09 AM

My research so far on those meeting all requirements except maybe the door:

Silverstone - TJ07
Thermaltake - Eureka & Shark
Ultra - Aluminus

Antec - none
CoolerMaster - none
Lian Li - none

Other brands I should look at?
July 28, 2006 1:29:46 AM

wheels? what are you trying to build a hotrod?
July 28, 2006 8:25:09 AM

Ok, I know you're all waiting with baited breath to find out what case I am going to buy and the suspense is killing you. :)  I'm getting closer. I have reviewed every case on newegg, tigerdirect, and frozencpu, and have come up with these three finalists:

Thermaltake Eureka
Thermaltake Shark
Gigabyte 3D Aurora

As these bear no relation to the current topic, I am going to start a new thread in hope some folks will catch the model of their case in the topic and wish to comment.

By the way, another nice feature of these models is that the "front" panel input block is actually on the front right of the case, thus not in the way of your feet or drive bays.

Thanks everone for your comments! You have helped me nail down my requirements.
July 28, 2006 12:45:45 PM

Well, after reading some pro reviews of the three, I decided on the Gigabyte 3D Aurora, primarilly because of its true tool-less design. Both Thermaltakes require attaching both HDD and ROM drives to rails with screws.

Thanks again for the advice and suggestions. Now I have to find one somewhere in Portland, OR. I don't like mail-ordering something that large and easily dented in transit.
July 28, 2006 1:32:30 PM

Shipping isn't a problem if the shipper is careful. My 70-pound computer arrived without damage. The outer box was pretty well beaten up, and the SATA cable on one of the drives had been shaken loose, but the computer itself was fine. Outer box, styrofoam packing, inner box, foam surround, plastic bag, computer. Those folks knew what shipping companies can do. :) 
July 28, 2006 1:42:31 PM

SATA cables are notorious for being insecure anyway, that doesn't mean much. No big deal to reconnect them.

When I go off to college, my computer is going into the box my case came in. There is no way I'm letting a 2.5 hour car trip scratch the Lian Li's finish, or knock a cathode loose. Or let a SATA cable come off :lol: .

And why does your computer weigh 70lbs?
July 28, 2006 1:44:21 PM

Quote:
Ok, I know you're all waiting with baited breath to find out what case I am going to buy and the suspense is killing you. :) 


Yawn. Actually, no. I tried to help you but you can make your own out of plywood and it will affect me knot.
July 28, 2006 1:50:55 PM

Quote:
Ok, I know you're all waiting with baited breath to find out what case I am going to buy and the suspense is killing you. :) 


Yawn. Actually, no. I tried to help you but you can make your own out of plywood and it will affect me knot.

I think he was being sarcastic. I hope so, because I would question his sanity otherwise.

So, him making a plywood case would affect your wind speed? :lol: 

And when did you turn pirate? :wink:
July 28, 2006 2:21:53 PM

Quote:
Ok, I know you're all waiting with baited breath to find out what case I am going to buy and the suspense is killing you. :) 


Yawn. Actually, no. I tried to help you but you can make your own out of plywood and it will affect me knot.

I think he was being sarcastic. I hope so, because I would question his sanity otherwise.

So, him making a plywood case would affect your wind speed? :lol: 

And when did you turn pirate? :wink:

lmao.
July 28, 2006 2:25:16 PM

Quote:
Ok, I know you're all waiting with baited breath to find out what case I am going to buy and the suspense is killing you. :) 


Yawn. Actually, no. I tried to help you but you can make your own out of plywood and it will affect me knot.

I think he was being sarcastic.

If not, I got it covered.

Quote:
So, him making a plywood case would affect your wind speed? :lol: 


If your CPU melts down, the plywood fire provides a fitting epitaph.

Quote:
And when did you turn pirate? :wink:


You gotta be born with it, matey. Where are yer wimmen? Aggrh!
July 28, 2006 2:58:00 PM

Quote:


If your CPU melts down, the plywood fire provides a fitting epitaph.

You gotta be born with it, matey. Where are yer wimmen? Aggrh!


Only if it's a burial at sea.





Peter: "So, Mr. Pewterschmidt, would you like some strapping young men working on your yacht?"

Mr. Pewterschmidt: "Are you calling me gay?"

Peter: "No, no, I just thought you wanted some more seamen on your, ah, poop deck. *gets punched*"
July 31, 2006 4:51:21 PM

Quote:
And why does your computer weigh 70lbs?


It has no fans. Silent operation. The side panels are very deep finned aluminum heatsinks. Heat transfer blocks and heat pipes conduct heat from where it's produced to where it's radiated by the side panels. Those heavy panels require some stout substructure, so the whole thing is big and heavy. No problem for me, as I never move it. I like the fact that it's nearly silent; all I hear is the disk drives.
July 31, 2006 7:11:48 PM

Quote:
And why does your computer weigh 70lbs?


It has no fans. Silent operation. The side panels are very deep finned aluminum heatsinks. Heat transfer blocks and heat pipes conduct heat from where it's produced to where it's radiated by the side panels. Those heavy panels require some stout substructure, so the whole thing is big and heavy. No problem for me, as I never move it. I like the fact that it's nearly silent; all I hear is the disk drives.

Cool. What kind of CPU and GPU temps do you see under load?
August 1, 2006 2:54:15 PM

Quote:
Cool. What kind of CPU and GPU temps do you see under load?


I wish I knew. All I can say is that the machine keeps running without any obvious signs of distress even when my living room is hot (no air conditioning, so it can reach the upper 80s F). I typically run the following:
1. Until Uru, an on-line game with fairly intensive 3-D graphics (Radeon X800)
2. Teamspeak
3. Windows Media Player, for the music I'm sending via Teamspeak

The case gets pretty hot under these conditions. Zalman's Web site indicates that the interior temperature is about the same as when fans are used. Their ratings seem to be conservative: the heatpipes to the CPU are capable of handling 150W, but they say not to use a CPU whose TDP is greater than 100W. I'm using a Pentium 4 3GHz, so I'm pretty close to that limit. This case with a Conroe chip, or AMD Venice-core, would be the cat's meow.

There are limitations on motherboards. Not all will work for one reason or another. This is Zalman's worst feature: they don't keep the list of compatible motherboards up to date. My computer, built by a company called "endpcnoise.com," uses a motherboard that's specifically stated not to be compatible (Asus P5P800), so some liberties can be taken with this.

Once I discovered quiet computers I've really been drawn to them. My Mac Powerbook has replaced the Mac desktop for most day-to-day activities, and the silent PC has replaced the Mac as my music server of choice.
August 1, 2006 3:43:44 PM

Quote:
I'm using a Pentium 4 3GHz, so I'm pretty close to that limit. This case with a Conroe chip, or AMD Venice-core, would be the cat's meow.


That's the ticket.

Quote:
Once I discovered quiet computers I've really been drawn to them.


I hear that. I worked for over a decade in a lab that had ambient noise levels of about 78dB. I then purchased a new instrument that had a very quiet pumping system (maglev turbos, large scroll pump and buffer, etc.) The system was so quiet, two PCs were the major noise sources in the room. I bought quieter HSFs, quieter fans, acoustical damping materials, etc. and got the ambient noise level of the room down to 64dB peak, 61-62 RMS. It was so quiet, some folks complained that it was too quiet. I loved it. Talking on the phone was much better as were meetings with clients. I could play music at a lower level and still get excellent sound. And that's the kind of work environment I can enjoy!
August 1, 2006 3:51:35 PM

Quote:
I'm using a Pentium 4 3GHz, so I'm pretty close to that limit. This case with a Conroe chip, or AMD Venice-core, would be the cat's meow.


That's the ticket.

Quote:
Once I discovered quiet computers I've really been drawn to them.


I hear that.

LOL.

My case is pretty quiet, I've been experimenting with the fan controllers in the BIOS (Asus Q-Fan FTW!) to see if I can quiet them down without hindering performance. If you set the fan settings to "Optimal" it will only run the fans at a necessary speed. So, my case is pretty silent most of the time, and when it's loud it doesn't bother me, since I'm usually wearing headphones anyway.
!