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Samsung 204b VS. Viewsonic Vx922

Last response: in Systems
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July 27, 2006 2:52:10 AM

Hi everyone, this is my first post on the forums. I have been looking at a LCD for gaming for about the past 6 months and I have narrowed down my decision to these two monitors but I cannot decide. Besides the obvious difference in size, 20in sam vs 19 viewsonic I was wondering if the resolution difference 1600 for sam and 1280 for viewsonic would make a difference. Is it bad to play games in a resolution other than the native such as playing a game in 1280 on the samsung which has a native 1600. Does that have an impact on the performance? Is it worse to go from a higher native resolution to a lower for gaming or from a lower resolution to a higher for gaming? Thanks and I hope my long essay wasn't too confusing. Basically if price was not an issue which of these two monitors would you choose?

Viewsonic:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?item=N82E1682...

Samsung:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1682...
July 27, 2006 2:17:13 PM

Hey man,

I'm not well versed in the arts of the LCDs and such.
I think you'd be better suited posting in the LCD and Flat Panel forum, here.
July 27, 2006 5:11:33 PM

Quote:
...Is it bad to play games in a resolution other than the native such as playing a game in 1280 on the samsung which has a native 1600. Does that have an impact on the performance? Is it worse to go from a higher native resolution to a lower for gaming or from a lower resolution to a higher for gaming?...

Arby's right about the LCD forum, but the quick answer is yes, it is bad to play in a non-native resolution that is not an *even divisor* of the native resolution. It won't slow you down, but it will look bad.
You typically cannot go higher than the native resolution. Remember, on LCDs, each pixel is a physical square with its own transistors, wiring, etc. On a CRT, each pixel is (roughly) just a patch of picture tube, and you can squeeze in more pixels by using a smaller patch of tube surface for each. You can't change the physical squares on an LCD.
You can simulate a lower resolution. If the lower res is evenly divisible into the native res for both x and y, no problem. For example, if native is 600v x 800h, you can easily display 300v x 200h by just using 2v x 4h native pixel blocks to represent each lower res pixel.
But what about displaying something like 480v x 640h? That would work out to using 1.25v x 1.25h native pixel blocks to represent each lower res pixel -- but on LCDs, you can't have fractions of a native pixel! So, the monitor will try to "interpolate" it, by adjusting the color/brightness of the neighboring native pixels to reflect a bit of the info in that pixel that can't be displayed. Basically, it will look blurry, and edges can seem to "jump" back and forth with only tiny shifts in the image. No fun to watch!
Bottom line: never use an LCD in non-native resolution.
!