Network Printers on w2k server

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

Hello All,

A quick questions (hopefully). Can the ability to print to a network
printer be limited to particular workstations? For example, I have printerA
and I only want users who are logged into computerA, computerB, or computerC
to be able to print to it. If in the security tab for the printer if I
don't have domain users and just put the three computers nobody can print.
However, if I add domain users any one can from any workstation.
I guess I need to do a loopback from the computer to the user, but can I
with the printers. I know I can do loopback policies in Active Directory in
Group Policy. But is there a way to do in the security settings of a
printer? Or is there another way?

--
Robert Cohen
A legend in his own mind
--
1 answer Last reply
More about network printers server
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

    "Robert Cohen" <dont@want.spam.com> wrote in message
    news:u1B8nHWLEHA.3712@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Hello All,
    >
    > A quick questions (hopefully). Can the ability to print to a network
    > printer be limited to particular workstations? For example, I have
    printerA
    > and I only want users who are logged into computerA, computerB, or
    computerC
    > to be able to print to it. If in the security tab for the printer if I
    > don't have domain users and just put the three computers nobody can print.
    > However, if I add domain users any one can from any workstation.
    > I guess I need to do a loopback from the computer to the user, but can
    I
    > with the printers. I know I can do loopback policies in Active Directory
    in
    > Group Policy. But is there a way to do in the security settings of a
    > printer? Or is there another way?
    >
    > --
    > Robert Cohen
    > A legend in his own mind
    > --

    Since you've mentioned AD, Organizational Units can manage and organize
    Users, user groups, computer accounts, as well as shares which includes
    printer shares.

    Imagine an OU with a given set of computer accounts, with the appropriate
    user groups + printers. You might write a simple login script to map the
    printers to any member of the OU and even specify who manages the printer
    for you (through delegation). All this assigned through the GPO associated
    with that OU.

    That way, its OU membership that controls which user gets what. Better yet,
    if the user is moved into another OU, he or she inherits from the new OU.
    This includes login scripts and printer permissions.
Ask a new question

Read More

Printers Workstations Servers Windows