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System too hot? Water cooling solution?

Last response: in Overclocking
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July 31, 2006 6:36:28 PM

-XFX Geforce 7800GT 256MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 Video Card
-2GB (2 x 1GB) DDR2 667 (PC2 5400)
-2 WD Raptor 74GB 10,000 RPM ATA150 (Striped)
-1 WD Caviar SE 320GB 7200 RPM ATA150 (Extra Storage)
-Intel P4 650 Prescott 800MHz FSB LGA 775 Model BX80547PG3400F
-ASUS P5LD2 Socket T (LGA 775) Intel 945P ATX Intel Motherboard
-ZALMAN CNPS7700-CU 120mm 2 Ball Cooling Fan with Copper Heatsink
-SeaSonic S12-380 ATX12V 380W Power Supply
-Lian Li V COOL PC-V1000B Plus Case

I built this system last Sept. and I am running a basic system no overclocking going on here. I used the stock Intel heatsink and fan for about a week before I upgraded them. Now that it's summer and much hotter out, I'm running the air condition 24x7 just to keep my office cool with this system running. I removed the case side, because the case was becoming warm to the touch.

I am considering water cooling, but have no idea where to start. I've been reading and aquiring knowldge, but can someone point me in the right direction?

I would like something just to cool the cpu for the moment, but something large enough that I can expand on to later (video, north bridge, hd's, ect). I don't care if it's internal or external or the looks really, just as long as I can cool it down.

I've got about $300 bugget to spend on getting me started. Can someone point me in the right direction? Maybe just a better fan system?

Any advice, links, reviews, anything to help me out?

Thanks
July 31, 2006 7:24:20 PM

I have and recommend the ThermalTake 745 Water Cooling Kit for entry level to moderate cooling rigs at $145 total, but advised to purchase an extra bottle of coolant.
It is made of high quality components that can be added to for GPU cooling also...
Highly recomended...
http://www.thermaltake.com/product/Liguid/DIY/cl-w0076/...
August 1, 2006 1:44:03 AM

darn you richpls =[

me no like big water
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August 1, 2006 2:06:30 AM

Gotta keep it real tho. It does turn in worhty cooling results, is well made, you get 3x 120mm radiators and can be had for under $150 complete.
August 1, 2006 3:14:25 AM

What are your temps? With good case ventilation and that zalman cooler you shouldn't have a problem. I would have a fan blowing across those raptors as they do get hot.
August 2, 2006 4:41:47 AM

Sorry dude, we've had this conversation before and if he's going to add a northbridge, vga and other blocks to the system that pump won't handle all that with 3 x 120mm radiators too.

My suggestion is to get the entry level swiftech kit. 1/2" tubing, good pump (almost 3 times more powerfull than the big water one) and quiet. Comes with a mounting kit to install the 2 x 120mm rad outside.

http://www.frozencpu.com/ex-wat-76.html
August 2, 2006 3:48:05 PM

My raptors are cool to the touch, but the cpu temp is getting up to about 65 to 70 some times. My MB temp is up to almost 50. That is if I dont have my case side off without a box fan pushing new air around the case. My video card is still in the "green" according to the software.

Hence why I want to go water cool. I've been looking at KOOLANCE EXOS-2 and ZALMAN RESERATOR v2. No offense but the big water just looks like a cheap kids toy and I wouldnt trust it.

I've also been checking in to more of the do it yourself peice it together systems thanks to all the input on the forumz and reviews else where.
August 2, 2006 4:11:39 PM

Zalman 9500 or Thermaltake Big Typhoon heatsink fan should cool it down. But if you want to overclock then get a water cooling system.
August 2, 2006 4:38:11 PM

Watercooling, in of itself, is fast becoming the answer for a cooling solution when air cooling doesn't seem to suffice. With that in mind, there are many premade kits out there that seem to offer a variety of choices but in going over to this type of cooling you first have to ask yourself what components it is that you intend to cool. If you don't fancy yourself as someone who will "get into" watercooling and will upgrade it's components now and then, then that gives you somehting of a path to go on. You may just wish to cool the CPU, in which case a premade kit would probably do just fine, Bigwater, Koolanceand Corsair come to mind here. It is quite the popular kit as a beginners kit as it does exactly what it was intended to do. I wouldn't opt for somehting like a one of those self contained kits that house the pump and coolant in a closed loop (Coolermaster R80 or R120) as they really don't do that good a job.

Now, if you intend on cooling more than just the CPU, like the northbridge chipset and perhaps the videocard as well, then you might consider going into a different realm altogether. It is safe to say that if you wish to cool more than just one component in a loop then you have to decide on a budget (or something thereof). Then you should determine if, once you get into watercooling, is it something you might stay with and have the kit grow as your computer grows - upgrading.

If you become a watercooling enthusiast then what you will find is that, ultimately, you will follow the DIY (Do-It-Yourself) route where you will end up using different components from different companies. While this is inherently more expensive, it is also always going to be the most effective for cooling. You'll research and get opinions and you'll develop your own style of cooling to suite your computer and your cooling philosophy. You'll do research and read peoples opinions and from all that you will determie which companies you like best and how you will set up your cooling loop(s). It is not that much different from building a computer as an enthusiast actually. While it can be said that a good air cooling solution is always better than a bad watercooling solution, it can also be said that a good watercooling solution is always going to be better than ANY air cooling solution.

I am a DIY man myself and my kit, like my computer, uses multiple components from multiple companies.

1/2 inch tygon tubing
Swiftech MCP655
Danger Den Koolsah GPU Waterblock
Maze 4 Northbridge Waterblock
Custom Drivebay Reservoir
Swiftech Peltier 226watt waterblock
Voltage Adjuster for Peltier
(2) dual 120mm rads (mounted externally) - each has 4 120mm fans in a "push-pull" configuration
Meanwell 600 SE12 Secondary PSU (for peltier)

So, figure out how involved you intend on getting in watercooling is my first piece of advice. Once you have that then you can have a clearer path on what you should get - premade kit or DIY.
August 2, 2006 4:41:07 PM

RichPLS. Sokkia Set 3BII REPRESENT!
August 2, 2006 4:42:57 PM

man that's too hot even on a prescott, and that cooler. should'nt be that hot, what's room temp?? And do you have any more fans on the case?? , i think that's more of a problem of bad seating or even poor air intake and outake , maybe add some more fans one the back getting that hot air out , and another one in the front having that cold air in.

i Have also a prescott a 3.0 from the first ones before all those number thiga magica things, and i runs on about 47/ 52 with a zalman 7000cu led in these hot portugal days like we are having with 38 degrees outside and with no A/C . i have a chieftec case and 3outake fans and 3 intake fans , obviosly low rpm noisblocker ones but my pc chip is quiet cool as you see, maybe you must review those air I/O , before jumping into water cooling, ahh and when i do some intensive work loads with After effects and gamming it gets maybe to 57 but no more than that.
August 2, 2006 4:59:56 PM

My home office is room temp of about 72 to 78 degrees year round.

The Lian Li case is vented to start, it comes stock with a blower (out), and 2 12 cm case fans (in). One of the 12cm fans has a redirect to the cup fan. The other is for the hard drive bay area.

I am now looking at some 5 1/4 bay fans for more input and maybe a pci blower to help circulate more air thru the system. Much cheaper than jumping to water cooling.

Also this machine is NOT overclocked and I will not be over clocking it. I have no reason to its plenty fast for me.
August 2, 2006 5:07:02 PM

Where is the outtake fan located? Would it be possible to mod the case so that you might could add an outtake fan at the top of the case? More fans moving air around doesn't always translate into better cooling. Ultimately, having a jetstream of sorts is what you are shooting for - where there is a directed path of air movement - say, air being drawn in from the lower portion of the case (and, perhaps, from the side) and being expelled in the upper back and top of the case (since hot air rises).
August 2, 2006 5:07:22 PM

hummm that's a good case for shure it mus vent well, i would not use those pci things , i personally don't like it, if i where you i would put some vents at front intaking air and some more at the back putting some air out, try removing the fan from the side cup, it has caused me problems in the past (if it's right on top of the processor fan). , and remember one thing hot air comes up, so the extractor fans should be at the highest poit of your case. for optimal use, just imagine the route from the air inside your case, and you can just mold it with the fans , and beware of the wiring, being tiddy pays when dealing with air cooling solutions.
August 2, 2006 5:12:23 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I am going to pick a PCI blower to put at the top and see how that helps I mean there are $5 so I am not wasting anything. I am also going to replace my CPU Heatsink and Fan for the new Zalman 9500 and buy some good thermal grease. Much cheaper than going water cooling and my quickest solution to my problem.

Again thanks for all the info. If this does not help I'll be throwing $ at it to go DIY for water cooling.
August 2, 2006 5:15:23 PM

don't change the cooler i don't think it's necessary, maybe try to reintaling it with new thermal grease. that's a fine cooler you have there, i prefer it do the 9500 in configs that don't overclock, becasue it moves the air more around the components of the case whether th 9500, just channels it. by some more fans and make a air path there
August 4, 2006 12:55:33 AM

I found out that the fan on the back of the case was actually blowing out. I changed that to blow in. I got a very very nice cheap, quiet blower off newegg and got some artic silver and regreased the heatsink to the processor. It dropped almost 20 degrees. i am at about 46-48 at full load now. That was just the craziest thing I've ever seen.

Thanks for all the help. I am totally in the clear now.
August 4, 2006 9:15:31 AM

ni it's very usual to happen. that back fan should be blowing out it was right , your'e front fans should be putting air inside. because like that you pump hot air outside the case if you don't have anything doing that it will perform worst. beware os AS aplication should be a very thin layer so it works fine.
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