best printer for post cards

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I need to print a bunch of standard 3.5" x 5.5" US Post Office pre-stamped
post cards (yes, I am aware that I could print 8.5 x 11's and cut em and
stamp em, but that's not what I need).
Not all printers can handle that size. I want a printer that will do the job
quickly and inexpensively, without paper jams.
Any recommendations?
5 answers Last reply
More about best printer post cards
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Can't tell you what the best printer would be, but I just cut a 4x6 sheet of
    photo paper down to 3.5x5.5 and it printed just fine in my canon i960
    printer. You have to fool the printer a bit by setting the paper size to
    4x6 as the choices are limited. Borderless prints can only be done in 4x6,
    5x7, and 8.5x11, but if you are using a program such as photoshop you can
    extend the palate on which the picture sits with the background set to white
    and place the picture or graphic you wish to print inside uneven white
    borders to fit the 3.5x5.5 card stock. As you probably know, printing
    borderless prints actually has the print head laying down ink just past the
    edge of the paper to avoid any error in feed which would leave any white at
    the edges. The overspray past the edge of the paper is absorbed into a
    sponge material under the paper feed area and the sponge is wider where the
    three borderless size paper edges would be. Trying to print borderless in a
    different size format could be done but would leave ink under the paper feed
    area which can transfer to the paper. Bottom line - This printer did feed
    the 3.5x5.5 paper (at least once for a test!) to produce a print.

    b"insaprsr" <cmxlusegrp@xemaps.com> wrote in message
    news:OX5oe.35$wL2.22@trndny07...
    >I need to print a bunch of standard 3.5" x 5.5" US Post Office pre-stamped
    >post cards (yes, I am aware that I could print 8.5 x 11's and cut em and
    >stamp em, but that's not what I need).
    > Not all printers can handle that size. I want a printer that will do the
    > job quickly and inexpensively, without paper jams.
    > Any recommendations?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Sorry for the second post, but I wanted to add that the Canon i960 is
    available either new or refurbished from Tigerdirect. If they still have
    the same deal I saw yesterday there was a sizable rebate that brought the
    cost of the new printer to about $80. I would insist on a new one only as a
    refurb may be a problem and the price on this deal was only a $10
    difference. These are discontinued units that have been replaced by the
    Pixma series. I don't know if a printer in the Pixma series has the same
    paper feed. They have two paper feeds, one of which is a cassette. The
    other one is where you would use card stock or photo paper. I don't know if
    you would have use for duplex printing, which this series also has, but the
    key issue for you, from what you asked, is if postcards would feed. Have to
    ask a pixma user to try it for you.


    "insaprsr" <cmxlusegrp@xemaps.com> wrote in message
    news:OX5oe.35$wL2.22@trndny07...
    >I need to print a bunch of standard 3.5" x 5.5" US Post Office pre-stamped
    >post cards (yes, I am aware that I could print 8.5 x 11's and cut em and
    >stamp em, but that's not what I need).
    > Not all printers can handle that size. I want a printer that will do the
    > job quickly and inexpensively, without paper jams.
    > Any recommendations?
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Any of the Canon printers I've used can handle small pieces such as post
    cards. My Lexmark E312 laser will also handle that size without a problem. I
    do things a little differently than most users and to me it seems easier.
    For nearly all my printing I use Microsoft Publisher, but any other page
    layout application would be just as effective. Since the printer default is
    8.5 x 11 that's how I set up my document, which is the default setting. On
    the Canon inkjets I've used, the paper guides are a fixed left margin with
    an adjustable guide that pushes the paper to that margin. A 3.5 x 5.5 card,
    envelope, label or any item of a size other than letter size, is only an
    area on what the printer thinks is a full sheet and as such it would start
    printing in the upper left hand corner. That's where I position the text or
    graphics. On the Lexmark laser, the paper guides center the item so I have
    to set up the document to print in the center of the paper. The point I'm
    making is that the printer doesn't know the difference between a post card
    and a full sheet. Just set up the documents to conform to where the paper is
    fed into the printer. I know this will also provoke some controversy, but I
    have Canon s820, i950 and iP4000 models. If text printing is the predominate
    use for this printer I'd actually recommend either the s820 or i950 over the
    iP4000. Those two models are out of date, but the i960 is the successor to
    the i950. Both of these printers and the i960 which Burt mentioned are
    classified as photo printers with 6 ink tanks, but I get better text
    printing on them than with the iP4000 which has 4 tanks plus a pigmented
    black. The iP4000 is a general purpose printer, but to me it prints better
    photos, but not text. At this time from a cost and effectiveness standpoint
    I'd go with Burt's suggestion and get the i960. If you are only printing
    black, then an inexpensive laser would also be a printer to look at. The
    only drawback is that due to inadequate fusing temperatures on some lasers,
    the toner on thicker stock sometimes doesn't fuse into the paper and can be
    rubbed or scrapped off.
    --
    Ron

    "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:VT6oe.1757$IE7.505@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
    > Sorry for the second post, but I wanted to add that the Canon i960 is
    > available either new or refurbished from Tigerdirect. If they still have
    > the same deal I saw yesterday there was a sizable rebate that brought the
    > cost of the new printer to about $80. I would insist on a new one only as
    > a refurb may be a problem and the price on this deal was only a $10
    > difference. These are discontinued units that have been replaced by the
    > Pixma series. I don't know if a printer in the Pixma series has the same
    > paper feed. They have two paper feeds, one of which is a cassette. The
    > other one is where you would use card stock or photo paper. I don't know
    > if you would have use for duplex printing, which this series also has, but
    > the key issue for you, from what you asked, is if postcards would feed.
    > Have to ask a pixma user to try it for you.
    >
    >
    > "insaprsr" <cmxlusegrp@xemaps.com> wrote in message
    > news:OX5oe.35$wL2.22@trndny07...
    >>I need to print a bunch of standard 3.5" x 5.5" US Post Office pre-stamped
    >>post cards (yes, I am aware that I could print 8.5 x 11's and cut em and
    >>stamp em, but that's not what I need).
    >> Not all printers can handle that size. I want a printer that will do the
    >> job quickly and inexpensively, without paper jams.
    >> Any recommendations?
    >>
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ron Cohen wrote:

    >Any of the Canon printers I've used can handle small pieces such as post
    >cards. My Lexmark E312 laser will also handle that size without a problem. I
    >do things a little differently than most users and to me it seems easier.
    >For nearly all my printing I use Microsoft Publisher, but any other page
    >layout application would be just as effective. Since the printer default is
    >8.5 x 11 that's how I set up my document, which is the default setting. On
    >the Canon inkjets I've used, the paper guides are a fixed left margin with
    >an adjustable guide that pushes the paper to that margin. A 3.5 x 5.5 card,
    >envelope, label or any item of a size other than letter size, is only an
    >area on what the printer thinks is a full sheet and as such it would start
    >printing in the upper left hand corner. That's where I position the text or
    >graphics. On the Lexmark laser, the paper guides center the item so I have
    >to set up the document to print in the center of the paper. The point I'm
    >making is that the printer doesn't know the difference between a post card
    >and a full sheet. Just set up the documents to conform to where the paper is
    >fed into the printer. I know this will also provoke some controversy, but I
    >have Canon s820, i950 and iP4000 models. If text printing is the predominate
    >use for this printer I'd actually recommend either the s820 or i950 over the
    >iP4000. Those two models are out of date, but the i960 is the successor to
    >the i950. Both of these printers and the i960 which Burt mentioned are
    >classified as photo printers with 6 ink tanks, but I get better text
    >printing on them than with the iP4000 which has 4 tanks plus a pigmented
    >black. The iP4000 is a general purpose printer, but to me it prints better
    >photos, but not text.
    >

    I do not agree with that. One nice thing about the Canon pigmented
    black is you can use a highlighter on the ink after about 10 minutes and
    it does not smear.

    > At this time from a cost and effectiveness standpoint
    >I'd go with Burt's suggestion and get the i960. If you are only printing
    >black, then an inexpensive laser would also be a printer to look at. The
    >only drawback is that due to inadequate fusing temperatures on some lasers,
    >the toner on thicker stock sometimes doesn't fuse into the paper and can be
    >rubbed or scrapped off.
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Thanks, all, for the information. I will further check out the printers
    mentioned. What I'm trying to do is print mostly black text, on two sides of
    about 800 USPS standard 3.5 x 5.5 postcards. My present printers will do the
    job, but my old Lexmark Z52 inkjet (which used to do this better than it
    does now for some reason--I tried cleaning the rollers with alcohol and it
    didn't help) can print a large number of these cards really quickly, but
    every once in a while it can't grab a card, and "prints" on thin air, and I
    have to reset the whole thing, finding the missed name and address, a real
    nuisance. My regular printer, an hp 9100 series all in one, takes about 8
    seconds to print each card (it takes that time just to sit and 'think' about
    what to do in between printing each card--that delay makes me nuts!!), tech
    support not able to suggest a workaround.
    So I'm looking for an inexpensive little printer to replace the Z52,
    dedicated to just one task, churning out post cards quickly and without
    jams!


    "measekite" <measekite@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:dH8oe.2104$wy1.612@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >
    > Ron Cohen wrote:
    >
    >>Any of the Canon printers I've used can handle small pieces such as post
    >>cards. My Lexmark E312 laser will also handle that size without a problem.
    >>I do things a little differently than most users and to me it seems
    >>easier. For nearly all my printing I use Microsoft Publisher, but any
    >>other page layout application would be just as effective. Since the
    >>printer default is 8.5 x 11 that's how I set up my document, which is the
    >>default setting. On the Canon inkjets I've used, the paper guides are a
    >>fixed left margin with an adjustable guide that pushes the paper to that
    >>margin. A 3.5 x 5.5 card, envelope, label or any item of a size other than
    >>letter size, is only an area on what the printer thinks is a full sheet
    >>and as such it would start printing in the upper left hand corner. That's
    >>where I position the text or graphics. On the Lexmark laser, the paper
    >>guides center the item so I have to set up the document to print in the
    >>center of the paper. The point I'm making is that the printer doesn't know
    >>the difference between a post card and a full sheet. Just set up the
    >>documents to conform to where the paper is fed into the printer. I know
    >>this will also provoke some controversy, but I have Canon s820, i950 and
    >>iP4000 models. If text printing is the predominate use for this printer
    >>I'd actually recommend either the s820 or i950 over the iP4000. Those two
    >>models are out of date, but the i960 is the successor to the i950. Both of
    >>these printers and the i960 which Burt mentioned are classified as photo
    >>printers with 6 ink tanks, but I get better text printing on them than
    >>with the iP4000 which has 4 tanks plus a pigmented black. The iP4000 is a
    >>general purpose printer, but to me it prints better photos, but not text.
    >>
    >
    > I do not agree with that. One nice thing about the Canon pigmented black
    > is you can use a highlighter on the ink after about 10 minutes and it does
    > not smear.
    >
    >> At this time from a cost and effectiveness standpoint I'd go with Burt's
    >> suggestion and get the i960. If you are only printing black, then an
    >> inexpensive laser would also be a printer to look at. The only drawback
    >> is that due to inadequate fusing temperatures on some lasers, the toner
    >> on thicker stock sometimes doesn't fuse into the paper and can be rubbed
    >> or scrapped off.
    >>
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