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can u guys recommend me a good 480-500W Power Supply?

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August 3, 2006 7:25:06 AM

what are some good brand names for PSs? is it possible to get something in the price range from $40-$60 without tax for good brand name PSs that are 450-500W?

thanks
a b ) Power supply
August 3, 2006 6:18:38 PM

The following PSUs are at least 80% efficient, meaning they do not waste too much electricity from the AC outlet inorder to deliver power to the PC.

SILVERSTONE SST-ST50EF 500W PSU - $96 shipped

ENERMAX Liberty ELT500AWT 500W PSU $105 shipped

SeaSonic S12-500 - 500w PSU - $123 shipped (after a $15 mail-in rebate)

I personally have the Seasonic S12 500.


There's also the:

Antec TRUEPOWERII TPII 480w PSU - $86 shipped

But it is only 70% efficient. So it will waste a little more electricity than the PSU mentioned above. Wasted electricity gets converted to heat so this PSU will generally run hotter than those above.

----------------------------

If price isn't an issue then I highly recommend the Seasonic S12 500.

If price is an issue, then get the Antec TruePower II.

If you want an efficient PSU without having to rob too much from your piggy bank then get the Silverstone.
August 3, 2006 7:17:51 PM

check Fortron Source on newegg, their 450w model is really good
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August 4, 2006 4:12:52 AM

Quote:
The following PSUs are at least 80% efficient, meaning they do not waste too much electricity from the AC outlet inorder to deliver power to the PC.

SILVERSTONE SST-ST50EF 500W PSU - $96 shipped

ENERMAX Liberty ELT500AWT 500W PSU $105 shipped

SeaSonic S12-500 - 500w PSU - $123 shipped (after a $15 mail-in rebate)

I personally have the Seasonic S12 500.


There's also the:

Antec TRUEPOWERII TPII 480w PSU - $86 shipped

But it is only 70% efficient. So it will waste a little more electricity than the PSU mentioned above. Wasted electricity gets converted to heat so this PSU will generally run hotter than those above.

----------------------------

If price isn't an issue then I highly recommend the Seasonic S12 500.

If price is an issue, then get the Antec TruePower II.

If you want an efficient PSU without having to rob too much from your piggy bank then get the Silverstone.


i really appriciate all this feedback buy you see my PC is 3 years old. i put it together in 2003 and i dont see any point on spending so much money on a power supply. the PS i got now came with my PC case and its 350W. my computer shuts off for no reason and im thinking cuz its heat. I also got alot of additional things added to it so that probably means my PS generates too much heat, plus it does too many things for the low ass 350W so it shuts down. I got 4 fans, 2 HDs, 2 cooling cases for those HD's that got fans on them so that each of these cooling cases needs to plugged in as well. After seeing all this do you really think i would need a 500W PS? how will 450W be in my system?

i dont wanna spend too much money on my PC cuz it makes no sense to spend so much $$$ on an old computer.

what do you think about this one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681... or can you point me out to a good PSU that is around $50? also what specs you look at to find out it doesnt waste electricity which produces heat?

thanx a bunch!
August 4, 2006 4:50:20 AM

That Thermaltake only has one 12v rail and its only rated to 18amps. It's functional but I don't know if I'd trust it. Mind you, my reservations are not because of the brand but one rail at 18amps wouldn't be too terribly hard to overwhelm under the right circumstances.

COOLMAX CP-500T EPS12V 500W - ($49) nice dual 12v rails at 18amps per.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
a b ) Power supply
August 4, 2006 5:31:58 AM

Quote:


I also got alot of additional things added to it so that probably means my PS generates too much heat, plus it does too many things for the low ass 350W so it shuts down. I got 4 fans, 2 HDs, 2 cooling cases for those HD's that got fans on them so that each of these cooling cases needs to plugged in as well.



List all your components and be as specific as possible. For example:

Athlon XP 2500+ at stock speed
Western Digital 200GB Hard Drive
Geforce 6600GT (not overclocked)
One 120mm Fan

Quote:

also what specs you look at to find out it doesnt waste electricity which produces heat?


You look at the Efficiency rating. The Thermaltake PSU you selected states that it is:

> = 65%

Look at the SPEC section in the link you provided.

A higher efficiency PSU wastes less electricity from the AC outlet and creates less heat. The most efficient PSUs are rated at 85% efficiency.

Here is a very simple example:

Two PCs with the exact same components except the PSU uses 200w of power during normal operations.

1. PC #1 has a 65% efficient PSU.

2. PC #2 has a 80% efficient PSU.

PC #1 will be drawing 307.69w from the AC outlet. 307.69w = 200w / 0.65

PC #2 will be drawing 250w from the AC outlet. 250 = 200w / 0.80

========================

Unless you are going to be pluging a power hungry graphics card for playing games, the Thermaltake you selected should be adequate.

If you plan on upgrading your PC to something a little more modern in the future then consider a dual 12v rail PSU like the:

XClio 450BL ATX 450W Power Supply - $44 + $8.50 shipping
August 4, 2006 9:11:39 AM

Quote:

List all your components and be as specific as possible.


Athlon XP 2100+
1 GB of Corsair XMS (1 stick)
200GB Segate HD 7200 RPM
80GB Maxtor HD 7200 RPM
a cooling device on each hard drive with fans on each
floppy drive
NEC DVD Writable
ATI Radeon 9500Pro 128bit
Neon Red Light (most of the time its switched off)
4 of 120mm fans, one on top, 2 at the back and one on the side

my system is NOT overclocked but i would love to overclock it, just dont know how to do that yet. was gonna ask on this board later on but if you can help me let me know.

Quote:
If you plan on upgrading your PC to something a little more modern in the future then consider a dual 12v rail PSU like the:

XClio 450BL ATX 450W Power Supply - $44 + $8.50 shipping


whats a dual 12v rail mean? do you think my system would do good with 450W PSU?

i was gonna get this one but some people tell me its not a good idea plus its a no name company

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
August 4, 2006 1:45:06 PM

The 12V rail is where most of the wattage will travel through.
CPU/Video usually run on these.
Having all/most of your power on one rail(think one circuit).
It may or may not be a problem.
The lack of SLI support probably isn't a problem though.
Unless you anticipate getting it some point in the future.
I personally know nothing of that brand(or lack thereof).
August 6, 2006 7:49:08 AM

anymore suggestions?
August 6, 2006 8:47:50 AM

COOLMAX CP-500T EPS12V 500W ($50)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
Great buy for the price because it has dual 12v rails with strong amps (18 per rail). It has the added bonus most in this price range do not with Active PFC.

Power Factor Correction - protects against things like voltage fluctuations and electrical irregularities that can affect the efficiency of your power supply. There are three types of PFC: active, passive, and non-PFC. Active PFC provides the best protection, while non-PFC provides the worst.
August 6, 2006 10:23:38 PM

PFC (power factor correction)is not something you will need to take into accout unless you are a corporate company and have over 50 computers that need building. The power supply industry has fooled everyone into thinking that for a mid-range system (which is what you have) you will need around 400W-500W. This is simply not true. For one if you add all the power consumption of all your components together you hit about 450W. but it is very VERY unlikely that your Proc., your Harddrives, your Vid. card, and all fans running at full on at the exact same time. For this system you will only need 300W-400W. The reason your computer keeps shutting down is because you are using the power supply that came with your case. These power supplies are useually cheaply made, unstable, and faulty. I would suggest getting a power supply in the 350W range that is built well by a well known company, or I might suggest something a little more incase you plan on upgrading in the future. the Zalman 460-aps is perfect for almost any system. especially since the 460W is not the top marked but the average, meaning it can be pushed, I tested mine going to around 520W one time while benchmarking. The dual 12Volt line thing is an important concept to consider. There is a reason that there arent just 30Amps running on one line. (line meaning loop of cuircuits in a power supply. different components run on different lines. the main one you will need to wrry about is the 12Volt because most system components run off these.) the reason you have Dual lines is because the power supply manufacturers arent "allowed" to have more than 20 amps on a single line, so they split it into two lines to have the 30 amps they want, or more specefically you want, into two for around 16-17 amps on each line. I hope this helped, although you wont be able to get the Zalman power supply on newegg, I got mine on ebay for less than half of retail and it works great.
August 6, 2006 10:42:12 PM

ENERMAX Noisetaker II EG495P-VE ATX12V 485W ($90)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
dual 12v rail with really strong amps (22 per rail), Active PFC

Athena Power AP-P4ATX85FE ATX12V & EPS12V 850W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...
single 12v rail with 48amps on it, no PFC

The preferable type of PFC is Active Power Factor Correction (Active PFC) since it provides more efficient power frequency. Because Active PFC uses a circuit to correct power factor, Active PFC is able to generate a theoretical power factor of over 95%. Active Power Factor Correction also markedly diminishes total harmonics, automatically corrects for AC input voltage, and is capable of a full range of input voltage. Since Active PFC is the more complex method of Power Factor Correction, it is more expensive to produce an Active PFC power supply.

The most common type of PFC is Passive Power Factor Correction (Passive PFC). Passive PFC uses a capacitive filter at the AC input to correct poor power factor. Passive PFC may be affected when environmental vibration occurs. Passive PFC requires that the AC input voltage be set manually. Passive PFC also does not use the full energy potential of the AC line.

Non-PFC power supplies are no longer recommended. In Europe, power supplies are now required to have either active PFC or passive PFC.

Better to be safe.....
August 6, 2006 11:01:42 PM

read the "SilentPCReview.com" article on power supplies to learn a lot about their use and function in a PC, also read their other articles in the refrence section to lear about other components. this review will really help you understand the importance of choosing the right power supply for your system, and if you dont care about the silent part of it, just skim through that and read the rest.
August 7, 2006 7:26:10 AM

thanx for all the feedback. so far im leaning towards the coolmax one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681... the only thing i dont like about it is the gay rainbow colors on the cords.

the zalman is over a $100 thats way too much to be spending on a power supply for an outdated pc. everything else is just as expensive.

im still reading into it, gonna check out the silentpc site next.
August 7, 2006 7:37:55 AM

It's a good choice as it has alot of modern features but at a relatively inexpensive price.
August 7, 2006 8:15:25 AM

Quote:
thanx for all the feedback. so far im leaning towards the coolmax one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681... the only thing i dont like about it is the gay rainbow colors on the cords.


I've had one Coolmax and it was a lemon. I think jonnyguru.com is overall down on the brand due to components and design (just going from memory, I just looked and it looks like he's yanked all Coolmax stuff). Anyway, I'd even go with an Antec PS before Coolmax since my Coolmax was DOA and at least my Antec lasted a while before it melted my system into a pile of waste. This FSP has dual 18A +12V rails and is just over $50 if you want a budget PS. My own belief is that you need to spend ~80 bucks to get to the bottom of the good PS choices.
August 7, 2006 9:07:55 AM

I would have to agree with you. As far as PSUs are concerned, it seems to be the one component that people will try and squeeze by on cheapness when it should be taken more seriously as an upgradeable component like GPUs and CPUs. However, when I look at PSUs I tend to err on the side of caution and look at all available features. I know it might cost a tad bit more but this is supposed to power a series of expensive investments and it shouldn't be taken lightly. People will have their opinions of course, like what features are important and not. But, as a matter of rule, why take the chance? Not having PFC, when the entire Eurpean Union has declared that a required component now in PSUs, seems to indicate that it is a desired aspect. Also, not paying better attention to amperage, when it is every bit important as watts or voltages, is a serious error in judgement to me. That is why, when I give peope advice, it is giving them something based upon my reputation as being a thorough researcher and careful planner and my years of experience.

Why people will be willing to risk so much with a cheap PSU to power thousands of dollars of equiptment is beyond me. But, you get what you pay for.
a b ) Power supply
August 7, 2006 5:24:34 PM

Quote:
I would have to agree with you. As far as PSUs are concerned, it seems to be the one component that people will try and squeeze by on cheapness when it should be taken more seriously as an upgradeable component like GPUs and CPUs...


Yep, I agree with you.
August 7, 2006 6:50:44 PM

I can agree with you all so far as well, I got my Zlaman PSU for $40 on ebay so if you can find another deal like tha then you are golden, just be carefull and look at peoples feedback on the seller. I know that right now you are out of luck as no one is trying to sell a zalman power supply unless you want to go for 300W, though really any of these power supply's suggested so far would be a great choice. you just have to decide.
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