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Removed heatsink, replace thermal paste?

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • Pentium
  • Heatsinks
  • Thermal Compound
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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August 5, 2006 1:36:03 AM

Hi
I'm a newbie right now. I'm assembling a system and when I was seating the heatsink for the Pentium D 805, it didn't really go in right. So I removed it and put it in again. Then I realized, did that just ruin the thermal stuff on the bottom? I have never turned it on. I simply put in the heatsink, removed it, and put it back. Will I now have to remove the stock thermal stuff and replace it? And if so, how do I remove it?

Thanks. Sorry if it's a dumb question.

More about : removed heatsink replace thermal paste

August 5, 2006 2:06:08 AM

As long as the thermal pad stayed on the hsf and part did not transfer to the CPU (and the pad didn't get gouged or torn; squished is OK), you're probably OK. Normally, according to Intel, you would have to remove the old material and apply new material. Since Arctic Silver 5 works better anyway, you might want to try that. A small syringe cost about $6 at my local CompUSA. To remove the old pad material, first scrape off as much as possible with a non-scratching substance, like the edge of a 3x5 index card. Then, use "anhydrous" isopropyl alcohol from your drugstore and lint-free cloth or wipes to remove the last traces.
August 5, 2006 2:06:50 AM

No i it should be fine, just make sure you still have a nice thin layer of thermal paste on the cpu surface. 8)
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August 5, 2006 2:09:13 AM

Quote:
As long as the thermal pad stayed on the hsf and part did not transfer to the CPU (and the pad didn't get gouged or torn; squished is OK), you're probably OK. Normally, according to Intel, you would have to remove the old material and apply new material. Since Arctic Silver 5 works better anyway, you might want to try that. A small syringe cost about $6 at my local CompUSA. To remove the old pad material, first scrape off as much as possible with a non-scratching substance, like the edge of a 3x5 index card. Then, use "anhydrous" isopropyl alcohol from your drugstore and lint-free cloth or wipes to remove the last traces.


When did he mentioned thermal pad, he said thermal paste :?: :!:
August 5, 2006 2:27:32 AM

My Pentium D 805 stock hsf had a square of material on it, which I call a "pad". It was goopy material, so I'm happy to call it "paste"; sorry for any confusion. :) 
August 5, 2006 2:29:02 AM

Quote:
My Pentium D 805 stock hsf had a square of material on it, which I call a "pad". It was goopy material, so I'm happy to call it "paste"; sorry for any confusion. :) 


no problem 8)
August 5, 2006 6:19:28 AM

Quote:
As long as the thermal pad stayed on the hsf and part did not transfer to the CPU (and the pad didn't get gouged or torn; squished is OK), you're probably OK.

It looked like some pastey material was left over on the CPU.

I'll probably just go out and get some Arctic Silver anyway just to be safe.
Thanks everyone!
August 5, 2006 6:50:30 AM

Good idea.... the AS 5 will provide better cooling performance anyway.
August 5, 2006 7:53:21 AM

Yep, i got some yesterday and ive seen a 3-5c drop in all fields plus it takes 200hours of 8 hour cycles to settle so it is worth the price by far.
August 5, 2006 8:02:53 AM

I am posting a bit late. I had the same situation. When i first assembled my system it did not booted. I changed ram and it still not booted. Then I thought that the processor might not be working so I borrowed a processor from my friend and tried it and the system still not booted. This way I torn some of the thermal pad. some part remaind in the cpu and some on the hsf. But i did not had any AS5 or other compound. So I just put it back on and its working till now. I have orderd some AS5 and will apply it as soon as it comes.

Intel D805@2.66
Idle: 52C
Load:62-64C
CASE:35C
August 5, 2006 8:02:02 PM

I've applied Arctic Silver 5, and according to the BIOS, my processor (Pentium D 805) is runnning at around 71 Celcius, which is obviously too high. I tried removing the paste with 99% isopropyl alcohol and reapplied it as per the instructions on the website, but it's still running at the same speed.
Any ideas? My motherboard is an Asus P5W DH Deluxe.

Thanks
August 5, 2006 8:48:18 PM

em, did you reinstall the hsf with the MB already installed in the case? Socket 775 hsf are VERY difficult to properly install unless you install it with the MB on your lap or on some foam to let the white pins come all the way out the back of the MB. It is almost impossible to tell if the hsf is properly installed unless you can look under the MB and see that each of the 4 pins is all the way through.
August 5, 2006 8:51:02 PM

Check out my long post on this thread:
http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/Part-Assembly-f...

Also, if you can post the "system" and "PWM" temps along with the CPU temp, it can help in figuring things out. My best guess, though, is that the hsf is not completely seated. Also, is it the OEM Intel hsf, or an aftermarket one (I assumed OEM).
August 5, 2006 8:53:36 PM

No, I installed it inside the case. Maybe I should try removing the MB.
I'm wondering if the bios could just be reading the temp wrong as well. I've heard a little bit about Asus boards (including this one) not being accurate. I touched the heatsink and it's not hot at all. If the CPU were running at 72 Celsius, would the heatsink be hot?
August 5, 2006 9:12:14 PM

Quote:
No, I installed it inside the case. Maybe I should try removing the MB.
I'm wondering if the bios could just be reading the temp wrong as well. I've heard a little bit about Asus boards (including this one) not being accurate. I touched the heatsink and it's not hot at all. If the CPU were running at 72 Celsius, would the heatsink be hot?

Maybe not, especially if there is not good heat transfer between the CPU and the hsf. There have been some other posts about people with high idle temps having (slightly) incompletely installed socket 775 hsfs.
The other thing to check is in the BIOS, there should be a setting (or set of settings) to control the CPU hsf speed according to temp. Sometimes this does not work quite right, so it wouldn't hurt to disable that control (meaning the hsf will spin at max speed all the time).
August 5, 2006 10:04:51 PM

Quote:
em, did you reinstall the hsf with the MB already installed in the case? Socket 775 hsf are VERY difficult to properly install unless you install it with the MB on your lap or on some foam to let the white pins come all the way out the back of the MB. It is almost impossible to tell if the hsf is properly installed unless you can look under the MB and see that each of the 4 pins is all the way through.

I did what you suggested and now it's running at 42 Celsius according to the BIOS. I believe that is where it should be?

Thanks for the help!
August 5, 2006 11:27:57 PM

woot! - now it's OC time!
!