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Any good Epson inkjjet printer?

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Anonymous
June 11, 2005 11:32:46 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I loved Epson color printers. They print beautiful pictures. I had been
using Epson printers for many years in the past. Because of frequent
cloggings, I switched to Canon inkjet printers (i950 and S520). But I am
not so happy with color on the prints with i950. Too much red on skin
color. But what I like about Canon printers is that they do not have
clogging problem.

I am wondering whether there is a good Epson printer(s) which does not clog
as the old model does. If so, please recommend me the model number. I
wish to go back to Epson printer. Craig
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 11:32:47 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Epson printers, while attractively priced and high-quality, cost you
hundreds of dollars in ink over the life of the printer. The extra
print quality is not worth the money. All inkjet printers tend to be
like this, but Epson is especially notorious for this practice.
If you don't have enough money for a color laser printer (don't worry,
neither do I), your best bet would be to go for one of the HP printers.
The DeskJet series printers are good for things such as color graphs,
but they do not produce digital photo prints very well. If you have the
money, you should get a higher-end printer--well worth it. Personally,
I've seen great results with the cp1700 model. Although I don't
technically own one, I use one a lot at work. They can print on paper
sizes up to 13x19 (sometimes marketed as size A3) and use individual
(cyan, magenta, and yellow) color cartridges, while expensive, last a
long time (depending on your printing habits, about a year, give or
take.) The printer itself starts at about $200. Weigh your options and
shop around (remember, not all dealers advertise on the web.)
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 11:53:17 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I have owned several Epson printers from the Stylus Color 400 to my current
printer, the Stylus Photo R200. But the best photo prints I have ever seen
were produced by old Stylus Photo 700. I brought samples of digital source
images and the CD I burned them to, printed on premium glossy photo paper,
at the highest resolution of my 700 into my local Circuit City store and
offered to buy any printer in the store that could top them. I walked out
with only my prints. No printer from HP, Canon or Lexmark could touch those
prints.

My R200 does a great job at printing photos and I would put it up against
anything from Canon or HP, at a similar price-point, anyday. But it still
is just short of the quality I had with my old 700.

<neopia9@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118542121.372090.41730@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Epson printers, while attractively priced and high-quality, cost you
> hundreds of dollars in ink over the life of the printer. The extra
> print quality is not worth the money. All inkjet printers tend to be
> like this, but Epson is especially notorious for this practice.
> If you don't have enough money for a color laser printer (don't worry,
> neither do I), your best bet would be to go for one of the HP printers.
> The DeskJet series printers are good for things such as color graphs,
> but they do not produce digital photo prints very well. If you have the
> money, you should get a higher-end printer--well worth it. Personally,
> I've seen great results with the cp1700 model. Although I don't
> technically own one, I use one a lot at work. They can print on paper
> sizes up to 13x19 (sometimes marketed as size A3) and use individual
> (cyan, magenta, and yellow) color cartridges, while expensive, last a
> long time (depending on your printing habits, about a year, give or
> take.) The printer itself starts at about $200. Weigh your options and
> shop around (remember, not all dealers advertise on the web.)
>
Related resources
June 12, 2005 1:12:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> If you get one with a bad gasket, you have a problem.

By gasket, do you mean that 1/2 folded piece of thin foam at the far
right of the printer, directly right of the waste ink system? That
gasket?

I'm trying to be fair, but from what i've observed, the head tends to
knock this out of place. It's not attached down in anyway except one
hook on the far right side. In my case the springs in the assembly
become strained and knocked it askew disconnecting the lower hose. I
only noticed it as I was printing with my lid open wondering why there
was a white thing dripping with ink being dragged across the paper. I
imagine my case is some what extreme, and could even be rare. But from
what i've seen in the demo models this gasket is almost always bunched
up in the corner not serving it's purpose. And old Epsons I find in
2nd hand stores, even the ones marked "dura ink", every one without
exception this piece 1/2 folded foam attached via one plastic hook on
one side is always missing.

If this is indeed the source of a problem, it strikes me as amazing
they haven't made the choice to go with something simple like double
stick tape to keep this thing in place, or two fold over clamps that
would keep this gasket taught on either side allowing the head to rest
in the middle assuring a positive seal.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 2:24:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <d8g48s$u35$1@reader2.nmix.net>, "satoshi"
<satoshi@thuntek.net> wrote:

> I am wondering whether there is a good Epson printer(s) which does not clog
> as the old model does.

Craig-

Epson clogging seems to be a random function. Most do not have a problem,
but occasionally one does, and smears the reputation of the rest!

I suspect it has something to do with how the heads are parked when not
printing. If there is a good air seal, evaporation is slow and clogging
is rare. If you get one with a bad gasket, you have a problem.

I've had several Epson printers over the years, the last 4 being inkjets.
Of those, the model C-60 developed a clogging problem. I replaced it with
a C-86, and so far it seems to be holding up even though I only use it
about once a month.

Fred
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 6:08:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

satoshi wrote:

>I loved Epson color printers. They print beautiful pictures. I had been
>using Epson printers for many years in the past. *Because of frequent
>cloggings, I switched to Canon inkjet printers *(i950 and S520). But I am
>not so happy with color on the prints with i950. Too much red on skin
>color. *But what I like about Canon printers is that they do not have
>clogging problem.*
>
>
>

They may if you do not use OEM ink.

>I am wondering whether there is a good Epson printer(s) which does not clog
>as the old model does. If so, please recommend me the model number. I
>wish to go back to Epson printer. Craig
>
>

They all have some propensity to clog, especially with non OEM ink.
However, one has to be real careful with the R800/1800 because they use
pigmented inks. The advantage, according to many, is greater longevity
of the print.

Be prepared to have the gospel read to you by the Churchgoers of the
AfterMarket Church of Latter Day Inks.

>
>
>
June 12, 2005 6:08:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:

>
>
> satoshi wrote:
*But what I like about Canon printers is
>> that they do not have clogging problem.*

>
> They may if you do not use OEM ink.

More bullshit lies from that moron mesershit.
I use nothing but 3rd party inks in my top-of-the-line Canon i9900 wide
format printer.
It has never clogged!
Frank
June 12, 2005 2:13:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

>The R200's and R300's (and I assume most of the R-series) have what looks
>like a thin metal X-shaped clamp over the top of the foam pad - presumably
>to keep it flat and in place. They also have a printhead that moves up and
>down and (from what I've seen of the way the printers park), they 'plonk'
>the heads directly onto the gasket; rather than the older method of having
>the gasket slide up and into place under the printhead. Time will tell if
> that actually makes any difference to the reliability; but so far if my
> experience and the experience of others is anything to go by, the R'series
> are a lot less likely to clog than previous models.

As far as the R series goes.

The plonk action seems to only be used for CDs and the purge cycle, and
oddly enough for cartridge change. I've not noticed a plonk during
normal mode. Now this whole mechnism looks like it's designed to
operate on hinge and slide into place when the printhead parks. You
can see the printhead slide to the right quickly, switch to slow
motion, and slowly pushes the whole waste pan and gasket to the right
and it slides up. This unit is also designed to lock into place for
when printing on CDs. Every once and a while it desides to not do it
slowly and bashes into it, but that could have just been my printer.
What might be rare is the hose below the waste pad getting
disconnected.

As far as the gasket and the foam waste pad, the waste pad does have an
X-shaped clamp thing, but the foam gasket (I called this thing a wipe
in the past) seems to be the same old design held in place by just the
one hook. Unless something has changed in 6 months.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 5:37:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

In article <fmmck-1106052224490001@ac834338.ipt.aol.com>, fmmck@aol.com
(Fred McKenzie) wrote:

> I suspect it has something to do with how the heads are parked when not
> printing....

....and/or low humidity levels, direct sunlight on printer, proximity of
printer to a radiator, dusty environment,...

If the OP has had clogging problems in the past, there's always a chance
that they will re-occur with other models unless the problem is addressed.

Jon.
[An Epson user who has been fortunate enough never to suffer a serious
clog]
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 5:58:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> satoshi wrote:
>
> *But what I like about Canon printers is
>
>>> that they do not have clogging problem.*
>>
>
>>
>> They may if you do not use OEM ink.
>
>
> More bullshit lies from that moron mesershit.
> I use nothing but 3rd party inks in my top-of-the-line Canon i9900
> wide format printer.
> It has never clogged!
> Frank


That makes you a top of the line idiot.
June 12, 2005 5:58:20 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

measekite wrote:
>
>
> Frank wrote:
>
>> measekite wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> satoshi wrote:
>>
>>
>> *But what I like about Canon printers is
>>
>>>> that they do not have clogging problem.*
>>>
>>>
>>
>>>
>>> They may if you do not use OEM ink.
>>
>>
>>
>> More bullshit lies from that moron mesershit.
>> I use nothing but 3rd party inks in my top-of-the-line Canon i9900
>> wide format printer.
>> It has never clogged!
>> Frank
>
>
>
> That makes you a top of the line idiot.

Not hardly jackass.
Unlike you, that makes me a real user with real experience.
Frank
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 6:07:05 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

<neopia9@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118542121.372090.41730@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Epson printers, while attractively priced and high-quality, cost you
> hundreds of dollars in ink over the life of the printer. The extra
> print quality is not worth the money. All inkjet printers tend to be
> like this, but Epson is especially notorious for this practice.
> If you don't have enough money for a color laser printer (don't worry,
> neither do I), your best bet would be to go for one of the HP printers.

....and spend hundreds of dollars more on ink *and* a throw away printhead.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 6:15:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118549557.008666.163270@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> If you get one with a bad gasket, you have a problem.
>
> By gasket, do you mean that 1/2 folded piece of thin foam at the far
> right of the printer, directly right of the waste ink system? That
> gasket?

That's it. Its a rubber gasket with a foam pad inset. (Underneath the form
pad is a pipe that leads to a vacuum pump that operates during cleaning
cycles).

> I'm trying to be fair, but from what i've observed, the head tends to
> knock this out of place. It's not attached down in anyway except one
> hook on the far right side.

That does happen once in a very blue moon, probably moreso on the cheaper
models. What tends to happen more often is that:

a) Ink gets dried either in or on the edge of the gasket and it allows air
to get in when the heads are parked. That causes the ink to dry in the
printheads and it blocks the nozzles.

or

b) The foam pad becomes either saturated or gets hard dried ink deposits
building up on it - causing wicking of the ink through the nozzles when
parked and drying the ink in the nozzles.

Both of those problems can be solved easily by applying a few drops of the
correct ink solvent to the pad/gasket.

Sometimes there's also a problem of air getting into the top of the
printhead through a badly sealed ink cartridge - but that's very rare and
I've only seen it happen when ink carts have been refilled dozens of times.

> If this is indeed the source of a problem, it strikes me as amazing
> they haven't made the choice to go with something simple like double
> stick tape to keep this thing in place, or two fold over clamps that
> would keep this gasket taught on either side allowing the head to rest
> in the middle assuring a positive seal.

The R200's and R300's (and I assume most of the R-series) have what looks
like a thin metal X-shaped clamp over the top of the foam pad - presumably
to keep it flat and in place. They also have a printhead that moves up and
down and (from what I've seen of the way the printers park), they 'plonk'
the heads directly onto the gasket; rather than the older method of having
the gasket slide up and into place under the printhead. Time will tell if
that actually makes any difference to the reliability; but so far if my
experience and the experience of others is anything to go by, the R'series
are a lot less likely to clog than previous models.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 7:42:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Frank wrote:

> measekite wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Frank wrote:
>>
>>> measekite wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> satoshi wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *But what I like about Canon printers is
>>>
>>>>> that they do not have clogging problem.*
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>> They may if you do not use OEM ink.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> More bullshit lies from that moron mesershit.
>>> I use nothing but 3rd party inks in my top-of-the-line Canon i9900
>>> wide format printer.
>>> It has never clogged!
>>> Frank
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> That makes you a top of the line idiot.
>
>
> Not hardly .
> Unlike you, that makes me a real jackass with real experience.
> Frank

hahahaha
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 9:36:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1118596411.900439.262580@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >The R200's and R300's (and I assume most of the R-series) have what looks
>>like a thin metal X-shaped clamp over the top of the foam pad - presumably
>>to keep it flat and in place. They also have a printhead that moves up and
>>down and (from what I've seen of the way the printers park), they 'plonk'
>>the heads directly onto the gasket; rather than the older method of having
>>the gasket slide up and into place under the printhead. Time will tell if
>> that actually makes any difference to the reliability; but so far if my
>> experience and the experience of others is anything to go by, the
>> R'series
>> are a lot less likely to clog than previous models.
>
> As far as the R series goes.
>
> The plonk action seems to only be used for CDs and the purge cycle, and
> oddly enough for cartridge change. I've not noticed a plonk during
> normal mode.

On mine, when I switch the printer on the heads lift up; move back and
forwards a bit and are then lowered back down. After printing, when
switching off, a similar processes is repeated - the last part being
moving the heads far to the left followed by lowering the heads.

> Now this whole mechnism looks like it's designed to
> operate on hinge and slide into place when the printhead parks. You
> can see the printhead slide to the right quickly, switch to slow
> motion, and slowly pushes the whole waste pan and gasket to the right
> and it slides up.

Indeed - thats part of the process. That's how previous models all (?)
worked - the cap/gasket the slides up and along on a cheap and nasty
plastic-to-plastic slide.

> This unit is also designed to lock into place for
> when printing on CDs. Every once and a while it desides to not do it
> slowly and bashes into it, but that could have just been my printer.
> What might be rare is the hose below the waste pad getting
> disconnected.
>
> As far as the gasket and the foam waste pad, the waste pad does have an
> X-shaped clamp thing, but the foam gasket (I called this thing a wipe
> in the past) seems to be the same old design held in place by just the
> one hook. Unless something has changed in 6 months.

If your refering to the rubber squeege head wiper; (to the right of the head
cap, just right of the gears for the paper feed etc.) then yes - its just a
slice of rubber clamped on at the base. I've never known any problems with
that design though - similar designs in various forms by most manufacturers.

There's a foam soak to the right of the cap/gasket waste pad too - just, as
you say, held in place with one hook. To be honest, I don't know quite why
that is there - I doubt the whole of the head would be able to be wiped by
that (it doesn't look big enough - but then I've not seen the underneath of
a Rseries(s) head to know where the nozzles are exactly). My guess is its
just an excess spray area rather than a 'wipe' as such.
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 1:10:26 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

You can get good ink from other places.
I use www.printpal.com
No relation
I have been using Epson for about 6 years with cheap ink.
(about 1/3 the cost of Hp or cannun.

<neopia9@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1118542121.372090.41730@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Epson printers, while attractively priced and high-quality, cost you
> hundreds of dollars in ink over the life of the printer. The extra
> print quality is not worth the money. All inkjet printers tend to be
> like this, but Epson is especially notorious for this practice.
> If you don't have enough money for a color laser printer (don't worry,
>SNIP>
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 4:43:24 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The newer Ultrachrome ink printers have a slower drying ink that is less
likely to clog, but the color gamut is a bit different so you may wish
to ask for a sample from Epson before deciding. These are used in the
R800 and R1800, and a different formula set in the 2200,

In the dye colorant printers, some of the newer ones are less likely to
clog, but all have that potential. the best thing is to know how to
unclog them when it happens to keep the clogging issue to a minimim.

If you wish more information regarding the process, email me, no charge
for the information.

Art

satoshi wrote:

> I loved Epson color printers. They print beautiful pictures. I had been
> using Epson printers for many years in the past. Because of frequent
> cloggings, I switched to Canon inkjet printers (i950 and S520). But I am
> not so happy with color on the prints with i950. Too much red on skin
> color. But what I like about Canon printers is that they do not have
> clogging problem.
>
> I am wondering whether there is a good Epson printer(s) which does not clog
> as the old model does. If so, please recommend me the model number. I
> wish to go back to Epson printer. Craig
>
>
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 4:51:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

The 'gasket' is the seal that is formed between the head surface and the
cleaning station edge, which is a rubberized material. The small pieces
of absorbent material which you refer to are just there to help direct
some of the spare ink that ends up on the head area.

Art

zakezuke wrote:

>>If you get one with a bad gasket, you have a problem.
>
>
> By gasket, do you mean that 1/2 folded piece of thin foam at the far
> right of the printer, directly right of the waste ink system? That
> gasket?
>
> I'm trying to be fair, but from what i've observed, the head tends to
> knock this out of place. It's not attached down in anyway except one
> hook on the far right side. In my case the springs in the assembly
> become strained and knocked it askew disconnecting the lower hose. I
> only noticed it as I was printing with my lid open wondering why there
> was a white thing dripping with ink being dragged across the paper. I
> imagine my case is some what extreme, and could even be rare. But from
> what i've seen in the demo models this gasket is almost always bunched
> up in the corner not serving it's purpose. And old Epsons I find in
> 2nd hand stores, even the ones marked "dura ink", every one without
> exception this piece 1/2 folded foam attached via one plastic hook on
> one side is always missing.
>
> If this is indeed the source of a problem, it strikes me as amazing
> they haven't made the choice to go with something simple like double
> stick tape to keep this thing in place, or two fold over clamps that
> would keep this gasket taught on either side allowing the head to rest
> in the middle assuring a positive seal.
>
June 13, 2005 6:09:08 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

> I still use the 3rd party and get great results no matter what you say

Great, feel free. No one is stopping you. In fact I didn't debate on
the quality of 3rd party ink.

> I love my Epson and my 3rd party ink!!!!

Great! I'm sure I'd love my Epson equaly on 3rd party ink.

> YES is is about 1/3 the cost of the real epson and Hp and cannun....

Apples an oranges, this was the only point I was trying to make. You
were saying that the Epson 3rd party ink was cheaper than "cannun",
which would be true if you were talking OEM. But this is not a fair
contest as OEM costs thousands of dollars a gallon regardless of the
make. But from the same site, the Canon ink was clearly cheaper.
Many good reasons to use an Epsons, but price doesn't seem to be one of
them.
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 7:55:29 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

"satoshi" <satoshi@thuntek.net> wrote in message
news:D 8g48s$u35$1@reader2.nmix.net...
> I loved Epson color printers. They print beautiful pictures. I had been
> using Epson printers for many years in the past. Because of frequent
> cloggings, I switched to Canon inkjet printers (i950 and S520). But I am
> not so happy with color on the prints with i950. Too much red on skin
> color.

Perhaps try experimenting with color profiles?
!