Cheapest Way to Print 500 Envelopes?

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

A friend needs to print 500 envelopes for the organization
she belongs to.

Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
she used to print the prototype envelope.

A local print shop charges $ 96.00 for 500 envelopes which
they supply. We haven't priced-shopped other print shops yet.

Office Depot recommended a color laser printer which would be
cheaper than the Lexmark's inkjet cartridges.

Thanks in advance,

--Jerry Leslie
Note: leslie@jrlvax.houston.rr.com is invalid for email
21 answers Last reply
More about cheapest print envelopes
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    > she used to print the prototype envelope.

    Everyone, my self included, has a knee jerk reaction to the cost of
    Lexmark cartridges. The 1100 uses the 13400HC, a 30ml 600p
    (5.7c/p)cart that sells for about $34.00. This isn't as bad as other
    Lexmarks, but this is pretty horrible. This is not a great deal but if
    your only project is printing 500 envelopes the Lexmark would be
    cheaper than $96. The cost per page is very high if you print 500
    envelopes often it would be cheaper in the long run to go with a
    different printer if we're just talking B&W text. Color well....
    another story.

    But a color laser just because you want to print envelopes? For 500
    envelopes? Are these color envelopes? The entry cost of a color laser
    is in the $400 range, the Konica 2400W. For black it is lower cost per
    page than the lexmark in all cases. The color, well, the color yield
    is pretty low and the price pretty high. $70 * 3 (cyan magenta yellow)
    1500p 3x4.6cp. Worth looking into higher end color lasers depending on
    how much you plan to use it

    But if these are regular ordinary envelopes, there are entry level
    lasers at $100 and $200 that would be much cheaper than the Lexmark.

    We just had a dialog on the Canon ip3000/ip4000 vs the old HP5p
    Laserjet. Both very cost effecitve solutions, but the HP5p is an old
    printer. For the most part, you can get the black for the Canon localy
    OEM for about $12 per 500p black. Just about any laser OEM is going to
    run you about $75 per 3000, 4000, 5000p depending on model black. Both
    have 3rd party options for refills, one which actually made the Canon
    cheaper to operate.

    http://groups-beta.google.com/group/comp.periphs.printers/browse_frm/thread/e621ed1f39a5acb5/f68519c5d709cbd3#f68519c5d709cbd3
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1118600845.353859.31030@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >> Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    >> she used to print the prototype envelope.
    >
    > Everyone, my self included, has a knee jerk reaction to the cost of
    > Lexmark cartridges. The 1100 uses the 13400HC, a 30ml 600p
    > (5.7c/p)cart that sells for about $34.00. This isn't as bad as other
    > Lexmarks, but this is pretty horrible.

    If you are just printing addresses on the envelopes the ink coverage would be
    less than 1/10th a normal "page", so the above page yeild should be far
    exceeded in printing envelopes, maybe several thousand envelopes per cartridge
    or more. Feed and paper haddling may still be an issue, but ink usage should
    be rather minimal.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, MS MVP Printing/Imaging
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Well it sounds to me that you should use the Lexmark since you've got it
    already and report back on how many envelopes you got on the first
    cartridge. That will give you a hint as to what you should expect for the
    rest of the job if you do it yourself. By the way how much do 500 white
    envelopes run these days?

    --
    Jan Alter
    bearpuf@verizon.net
    or
    jalter@phila.k12.pa.us
    "leslie" <LESLIE@JRLVAX.HOUSTON.RR.COM> wrote in message
    news:Kf_qe.39961$j51.37824@tornado.texas.rr.com...
    >A friend needs to print 500 envelopes for the organization
    > she belongs to.
    >
    > Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    > she used to print the prototype envelope.
    >
    > A local print shop charges $ 96.00 for 500 envelopes which
    > they supply. We haven't priced-shopped other print shops yet.
    >
    > Office Depot recommended a color laser printer which would be
    > cheaper than the Lexmark's inkjet cartridges.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > --Jerry Leslie
    > Note: leslie@jrlvax.houston.rr.com is invalid for email
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > If you are just printing addresses on the envelopes the ink coverage would be
    > less than 1/10th a normal "page"

    I thought it was agreed upon that 1/20th or 5% was the agreed upon
    amount. But I don't have an accurate envelope count, and for all I
    know the OP wants to do color envelopes. On the one hand, I am
    somewhat pleased someone at Office Depot is nice enough to explain that
    Lexmarks are so costly to print with, but on the other hand they can't
    tell you "how costly" or rather reccomend a color laser.

    On the one hand I agree with you, the lexmark would likely do the job
    without needing a refill if doing a series of simple envelopes. On the
    other hand, anyone who plans to print more than 5 reams of paper a year
    would be better served looking at more cost effective solutions, and
    might be worth buying a $100 printer to do the job and as a bonus own
    something that has lower long term costs.

    > Feed and paper haddling may still be an issue, but ink usage should
    > be rather minimal.

    As far as the feed goes, wisdom from someone who actually does
    envelopes would be useful. But since most printer companies are
    pushing their photo paper in sizes as small as 4x6 single feeding of
    envelopes shouldn't be much of a bother in inkjets. I've not met a
    printer that can't handle at least single feeding of #10 envelopes.
    Shorter length ones, it disapointed me that and older deskjet 800
    series had no problems what so ever yet the psc950 didn't do it with
    ease, but had no problem with the epson r200 nor the canon mp760...
    yet. Some entry level lasers I enjoyed jams on small envelopes though.
    But I've not had to do 500 envelopes at a time.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > Cheapest way?
    > Typewriter.

    Is it? This might be true for a fabric ribbon but it might not be true
    for a carbon ribbon. Sure some are $5.00 a pop, but how many
    characters per ribbon?
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Why not print onto labels?

    I'm sure the addressees are all in a database that has some kind of sort
    function. This is the way I'd approach it. If you mess up a label or two at
    least you haven't sacrificed the envelope as well.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Having read the original post again I have probably mis intepreted your
    request. Do you want envelopes decorated with a logo rather than addressee
    details? If so then excuse me and forget I ever typed......
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Cheapest way?
    Typewriter.


    "leslie" <LESLIE@JRLVAX.HOUSTON.RR.COM> wrote in message
    news:Kf_qe.39961$j51.37824@tornado.texas.rr.com...
    > A friend needs to print 500 envelopes for the organization
    > she belongs to.
    >
    > Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    > she used to print the prototype envelope.
    >
    > A local print shop charges $ 96.00 for 500 envelopes which
    > they supply. We haven't priced-shopped other print shops yet.
    >
    > Office Depot recommended a color laser printer which would be
    > cheaper than the Lexmark's inkjet cartridges.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > --Jerry Leslie
    > Note: leslie@jrlvax.houston.rr.com is invalid for email
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > A long time ago I had an HP 4P laser which had a front feed to give it a
    > straight paper path and it worked a little bit, but the other lasers I've
    > had starting with an HP IIIP didn't do well at all with envelopes. The other
    > lasers were Lexmark Optra S 1650 and 1850, HP 5000 (a fantastic laser for
    > anything except envelopes) and the little Lexmark E312 I now have. The E312
    > is passable, but the Canon inkjets are much better for envelopes.

    I remember my HP II did have soso results, a slight curve to them. My
    TI microlaser seemed to do a much better job, but I was more pleased
    with the results from just about any inkjet. My thoughts were that
    there was no chance in heck that rain would affect the ledgibility
    using my laser, which was an issue on my PSC 950 but seems to be less
    so on my Canon IP3000. I've been using on of my first printouts as an
    iced latté coaster, while the black ink is running a little it's still
    ledgible.

    I was just reading up on the 2400W Color Laser Printer, which is likely
    the model Office Depot is pushing. "To print an envelope, you have to
    take out all the paper, put in your envelope, move the slide, open the
    top, move two levers, close the top, and print. When you are done,
    reverse the process" --random disgruntled user posting this everywhere
    The two levers they are talking about is the fuser seperator which, in
    theory, would resolve the pinching issue Ron was talking about. It
    might sound like a pain but sounds to me like the output is less likely
    to be crumpled or curved. But the bad part is the user manual says
    only 10 #10 envelopes at a time depending on the thickness. Oddly
    enough the same amount is claimed for the HP 3500 costing $750. But
    either a $400 printer or a $750 printer seems like overkill for one
    500p job unless the person wants a new spiffy printer. But I know
    nothing about this printer other than it's sold localy.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    leslie wrote:
    > A friend needs to print 500 envelopes for the organization
    > she belongs to.
    >
    > Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    > she used to print the prototype envelope.
    >
    > A local print shop charges $ 96.00 for 500 envelopes which
    > they supply. We haven't priced-shopped other print shops yet.
    >
    > Office Depot recommended a color laser printer which would be
    > cheaper than the Lexmark's inkjet cartridges.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > --Jerry Leslie
    > Note: leslie@jrlvax.houston.rr.com is invalid for email

    Get some printable labels and put the addresses on those.

    You're probably only talking about half a dozen sheets. That
    shouldn't cost over a buck.

    --
    The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Binky (binky@binkynet.com) wrote:
    : Having read the original post again I have probably mis intepreted your
    : request. Do you want envelopes decorated with a logo rather than addressee
    : details? If so then excuse me and forget I ever typed......
    :

    IIRC, the printing is a request for donations. I don't recall whether
    there were any graphics.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Binky (binky@binkynet.com) wrote:
    : Why not print onto labels?
    :
    : I'm sure the addressees are all in a database that has some kind of sort
    : function. This is the way I'd approach it. If you mess up a label or two at
    : least you haven't sacrificed the envelope as well.
    :
    :
    Thanks, I hadn't thought about that option until after the original post.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Jan Alter (bearpuf@verizon.net) wrote:
    : Well it sounds to me that you should use the Lexmark since you've got it
    : already and report back on how many envelopes you got on the first
    : cartridge. That will give you a hint as to what you should expect for the
    : rest of the job if you do it yourself.

    Thanks.

    : By the way how much do 500 white envelopes run these days?
    :

    $ 4.78 at Office Depot:

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?B5EE12F3B
    Office Depot® White Wove Envelopes, #10 (4 1/8" x 9 1/2"), 24 Lb,
    White, Box Of 500 at Office Depot.

    The original link, wrapped to 2 lines:

    http://www.officedepot.com/ddSKU.do?level=SK&id=844555&N=1000000347&
    An=browse
    Office Depot® White Wove Envelopes, #10 (4 1/8" x 9 1/2"), 24 Lb,
    White, Box Of 500 at Office Depot.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1118629610.277936.251310@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...

    <snipped>
    > As far as the feed goes, wisdom from someone who actually does
    > envelopes would be useful. But since most printer companies are
    > pushing their photo paper in sizes as small as 4x6 single feeding of
    > envelopes shouldn't be much of a bother in inkjets. I've not met a
    > printer that can't handle at least single feeding of #10 envelopes.
    > Shorter length ones, it disapointed me that and older deskjet 800
    > series had no problems what so ever yet the psc950 didn't do it with
    > ease, but had no problem with the epson r200 nor the canon mp760...
    > yet. Some entry level lasers I enjoyed jams on small envelopes though.
    > But I've not had to do 500 envelopes at a time.
    >

    First, I need to say that I've owned three offset print shops and am now
    retired from that industry. At the quoted price for 500 envelopes, the OP
    must surely want multiple colors and possibly very close registration. If
    not, they are being ripped off big time. As to printing using an inkjet or
    laser. I've tried doing envelopes with lasers in the past and haven't been
    pleased with the results. The envelopes are under too much pressure at the
    fusing station and frequently get curled, crinkled or otherwise damaged.
    OTH, top feed inkjets can do a pretty good job on envelopes and do them cost
    effectively for shorter runs such as 500. The more complex the logo, the
    more it would cost if offset printed, but from an inkjet, the only added
    cost would be the small amount of ink required for the logo. I still print a
    lot of envelopes using inkjets (usually addresses for wedding invitations
    and other bulk mailings, but also return addresses w/logo's on occasion). It
    doesn't really matter as the process is the same. Because envelopes are
    plain paper, the colors may not come out as vivid as with offset, but if
    cost is a factor inkjets are the way to go for short runs. For the past few
    years I've used a variety of Canon S, I and Pixma inkjets and all feed
    envelopes quite easily and with excellent registration. My iP4000 can handle
    15 #10's at a time without a problem. If you don't mind feeding envelopes to
    the printer for an extended period using a top feed inkjet would be a cost
    effective method. The iP4000 (and all the Canon's I have) can handle any
    size envelope up to the size limits of the printer.
    -
    Ron
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ron - my HP5P laser printer handles most envelopes quite well. There is a
    drop-down top feed tray in the front and a drop-down tray in the back to
    permit a straight paper path. Most envelopes print well on this printer
    with a minimum of curl which subsequently flattens out when several are
    stacked together. Even the really cheap ones do well. The glue tends to
    stick very lightly and opens easily. Printing return addresses on the back
    flap of some envelopes can be a problem as envelopes feed at the narrow edge
    and the flap can cause a jam. It is an old printer (oldie but goodie) and
    is not the fastest. I have had it for about 8 years with moderate home
    office use without a minute of downtime. I have done 50 - 100 envelopes at
    a time and can stack four or five without a jam. My i960 Canon can handle
    printing on the back flap better on certain envelopes and doesn't tend to
    jam for backside printing as I can feed the envelope at the long edge at the
    fold of the flap.

    "Ron Cohen" <d+r+c+0+2+3@sbcXXXglobalYYY.ZZZnet> wrote in message
    news:Xy9re.355$Nz2.237@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...
    > "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:1118629610.277936.251310@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > <snipped>
    >> As far as the feed goes, wisdom from someone who actually does
    >> envelopes would be useful. But since most printer companies are
    >> pushing their photo paper in sizes as small as 4x6 single feeding of
    >> envelopes shouldn't be much of a bother in inkjets. I've not met a
    >> printer that can't handle at least single feeding of #10 envelopes.
    >> Shorter length ones, it disapointed me that and older deskjet 800
    >> series had no problems what so ever yet the psc950 didn't do it with
    >> ease, but had no problem with the epson r200 nor the canon mp760...
    >> yet. Some entry level lasers I enjoyed jams on small envelopes though.
    >> But I've not had to do 500 envelopes at a time.
    >>
    >
    > First, I need to say that I've owned three offset print shops and am now
    > retired from that industry. At the quoted price for 500 envelopes, the OP
    > must surely want multiple colors and possibly very close registration. If
    > not, they are being ripped off big time. As to printing using an inkjet or
    > laser. I've tried doing envelopes with lasers in the past and haven't been
    > pleased with the results. The envelopes are under too much pressure at the
    > fusing station and frequently get curled, crinkled or otherwise damaged.
    > OTH, top feed inkjets can do a pretty good job on envelopes and do them
    > cost effectively for shorter runs such as 500. The more complex the logo,
    > the more it would cost if offset printed, but from an inkjet, the only
    > added cost would be the small amount of ink required for the logo. I still
    > print a lot of envelopes using inkjets (usually addresses for wedding
    > invitations and other bulk mailings, but also return addresses w/logo's on
    > occasion). It doesn't really matter as the process is the same. Because
    > envelopes are plain paper, the colors may not come out as vivid as with
    > offset, but if cost is a factor inkjets are the way to go for short runs.
    > For the past few years I've used a variety of Canon S, I and Pixma inkjets
    > and all feed envelopes quite easily and with excellent registration. My
    > iP4000 can handle 15 #10's at a time without a problem. If you don't mind
    > feeding envelopes to the printer for an extended period using a top feed
    > inkjet would be a cost effective method. The iP4000 (and all the Canon's I
    > have) can handle any size envelope up to the size limits of the printer.
    > -
    > Ron
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    A long time ago I had an HP 4P laser which had a front feed to give it a
    straight paper path and it worked a little bit, but the other lasers I've
    had starting with an HP IIIP didn't do well at all with envelopes. The other
    lasers were Lexmark Optra S 1650 and 1850, HP 5000 (a fantastic laser for
    anything except envelopes) and the little Lexmark E312 I now have. The E312
    is passable, but the Canon inkjets are much better for envelopes.

    When printing on the back flaps (as with A2, A6 or wedding invitation
    envelopes), I find it advisable to open the flap so the envelope has a
    little less thickness and then feed the envelope from the bottom edge. This
    also makes it possible to print a mailing address on the front side and a
    return address or message on the flap with one pass. The only time I don't
    open the flaps is when the envelopes have to be fed from the short edge due
    to the physical limitations of the printer, i.e. #10's are too long to be
    fed from the long edge and must be fed from the short side.
    --
    Ron

    "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:dS9re.27427$J12.7462@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    > Ron - my HP5P laser printer handles most envelopes quite well. There is a
    > drop-down top feed tray in the front and a drop-down tray in the back to
    > permit a straight paper path. Most envelopes print well on this printer
    > with a minimum of curl which subsequently flattens out when several are
    > stacked together. Even the really cheap ones do well. The glue tends to
    > stick very lightly and opens easily. Printing return addresses on the
    > back flap of some envelopes can be a problem as envelopes feed at the
    > narrow edge and the flap can cause a jam. It is an old printer (oldie but
    > goodie) and is not the fastest. I have had it for about 8 years with
    > moderate home office use without a minute of downtime. I have done 50 -
    > 100 envelopes at a time and can stack four or five without a jam. My i960
    > Canon can handle printing on the back flap better on certain envelopes and
    > doesn't tend to jam for backside printing as I can feed the envelope at
    > the long edge at the fold of the flap.
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I also had a 3P. As I recall, it didn't have the rear drop-down deck and
    required that the envelope make a U-turn after printing. It munched
    envelopes. Maybe I am describing the 2P??? I had a succession of the P
    series printers after my Toshiba dot matrix printers with the best
    near-letter-quality printing for its time died.
    "Ron Cohen" <d+r+c+0+2+3@sbcXXXglobalYYY.ZZZnet> wrote in message
    news:qvare.504$ks4.3@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
    >A long time ago I had an HP 4P laser which had a front feed to give it a
    >straight paper path and it worked a little bit, but the other lasers I've
    >had starting with an HP IIIP didn't do well at all with envelopes. The
    >other lasers were Lexmark Optra S 1650 and 1850, HP 5000 (a fantastic laser
    >for anything except envelopes) and the little Lexmark E312 I now have. The
    >E312 is passable, but the Canon inkjets are much better for envelopes.
    >
    > When printing on the back flaps (as with A2, A6 or wedding invitation
    > envelopes), I find it advisable to open the flap so the envelope has a
    > little less thickness and then feed the envelope from the bottom edge.
    > This also makes it possible to print a mailing address on the front side
    > and a return address or message on the flap with one pass. The only time I
    > don't open the flaps is when the envelopes have to be fed from the short
    > edge due to the physical limitations of the printer, i.e. #10's are too
    > long to be fed from the long edge and must be fed from the short side.
    > --
    > Ron
    >
    > "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    > news:dS9re.27427$J12.7462@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
    >> Ron - my HP5P laser printer handles most envelopes quite well. There is
    >> a drop-down top feed tray in the front and a drop-down tray in the back
    >> to permit a straight paper path. Most envelopes print well on this
    >> printer with a minimum of curl which subsequently flattens out when
    >> several are stacked together. Even the really cheap ones do well. The
    >> glue tends to stick very lightly and opens easily. Printing return
    >> addresses on the back flap of some envelopes can be a problem as
    >> envelopes feed at the narrow edge and the flap can cause a jam. It is an
    >> old printer (oldie but goodie) and is not the fastest. I have had it for
    >> about 8 years with moderate home office use without a minute of downtime.
    >> I have done 50 - 100 envelopes at a time and can stack four or five
    >> without a jam. My i960 Canon can handle printing on the back flap better
    >> on certain envelopes and doesn't tend to jam for backside printing as I
    >> can feed the envelope at the long edge at the fold of the flap.
    >
    >
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The 2p and 3p look the same. The difference was under the covers, but the
    paper path was identical. I got the 3p in 1992 and at $900.00 which included
    a proprietary memory card it certainly wasn't a throw away printer. Four
    pages a minute is top speed, but the thing will never wear out. Times have
    changed.
    --
    Ron

    "Burt" <sfbjgNOSPAM@pacbell.net> wrote in message
    news:jhire.458$NU5.363@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
    >I also had a 3P. As I recall, it didn't have the rear drop-down deck and
    >required that the envelope make a U-turn after printing. It munched
    >envelopes. Maybe I am describing the 2P??? I had a succession of the P
    >series printers after my Toshiba dot matrix printers with the best
    >near-letter-quality printing for its time died.
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Another possibility is to use envelopes with cutouts that let the
    address on the letter inside show through. Cut out might be covered
    with cellophane or might just be 'missing'.


    leslie wrote:
    > A friend needs to print 500 envelopes for the organization
    > she belongs to.
    >
    > Her printer is a Lexmark 1100 printer/scanner/copier, which
    > she used to print the prototype envelope.
    >
    > A local print shop charges $ 96.00 for 500 envelopes which
    > they supply. We haven't priced-shopped other print shops yet.
    >
    > Office Depot recommended a color laser printer which would be
    > cheaper than the Lexmark's inkjet cartridges.
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > --Jerry Leslie
    > Note: leslie@jrlvax.houston.rr.com is invalid for email
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Window envelopes are extremely expensive -- about 5 times the
    cost of the standard type.

    Bennett Price wrote:
    > Another possibility is to use envelopes with cutouts that let the
    > address on the letter inside show through. Cut out might be covered
    > with cellophane or might just be 'missing'.
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In message <d8pjoq$gvq$1@roundup.shout.net>, Mike Berger
    <berger@shout.net> writes
    >Window envelopes are extremely expensive -- about 5 times the
    >cost of the standard type.

    Eh? From where? I would have said about 10%

    --
    Timothy
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