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Creating Mirror Set

Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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Anonymous
April 11, 2005 5:47:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

I'm trying to add a hard drive and create a mirror set of the information on
the original drive. I don't want to do something stupid, like copy the blank
disk onto the new disk ( I once did just that!!)so I want to know before it's
too late the exact procedure for establishing a mirrored set, when one disk
is already in use as a dynmanic drive. Is there a step specifically to
determine which direction the information is copied? Thanks or any help.

Jonathan

More about : creating mirror set

Anonymous
April 12, 2005 2:03:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

Mirror creation begins with a volume on one disk and unallocated space on
another one and this is a one-way procedure. You never decide the mirror
reflection; it's the system who creates a new volume which would be an exact
copy, i.e. mirror/shadow, of existed volume. The only point of failure is
when someone deletes a wrong volume but you cannot delete the system volume,
boot volume, or any volume that contains the active paging file or crash
dump (memory dump), or OEM partition, and you cannot delete an extended
partition unless the extended partition is empty from within Windows.
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 2:03:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

Thanks. That helped a lot. I was able to get the mirror set up and I'm a
happy camper--at least till the next disaster.

"Jetro" wrote:

> Mirror creation begins with a volume on one disk and unallocated space on
> another one and this is a one-way procedure. You never decide the mirror
> reflection; it's the system who creates a new volume which would be an exact
> copy, i.e. mirror/shadow, of existed volume. The only point of failure is
> when someone deletes a wrong volume but you cannot delete the system volume,
> boot volume, or any volume that contains the active paging file or crash
> dump (memory dump), or OEM partition, and you cannot delete an extended
> partition unless the extended partition is empty from within Windows.
>
>
Anonymous
April 13, 2005 12:37:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.advanced_server (More info?)

Great. Having mirror you pushed the next disaster far away.
!