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Parts coming in for first build, why do I feel this way?

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August 7, 2006 8:23:50 PM

Ever since I ordered everything from Newegg I've had this overwhelming feeling of dredd hanging over my head like I just did something VERY wrong, hehe??

I just spent approx $2500.00 on a brand new system, that's everything from Case, to Ram to HD to Brand New 20.1" Acer gaming Monitor but I've never before ever actualy built a system in my life.

In the past I've worked on systems, replaced HD's, Ram, CD-Roms, whatever, you name it, but still. I guess I'm just nervous about actually building my first system, hence the feeling of dredd?

I tried to find a book to help me but there just doesn't seem to be anything out there that is up to date enough to warrant spending any amount of $$ on.

I guess as long as I take my time, watch out for static electricity it's not too hard? The one thing I've never done though is actually put the CPU into the Motherboard. Someone feel like giving me a quick run through on how to do that, or point me to a place where they have write-up on how to do that?

Thanks in advance, everything should be here by the 10th providing UPS does their job as they say they will?
August 7, 2006 8:38:04 PM

there should be a part of the cpu and mobo manual that tells you have to put the cpu into the mobo

and ups is usually pretty good about getting the packages to u on the date they tell you
August 7, 2006 9:28:18 PM

Recently PC Gamer released a Magazine solely devoted to building a PC. If you go look at your local news stand or book store they might still have a copy. I saw one at my local bookstore yesterday, so your chances of finding one might be kinda good.

T_Bone
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August 7, 2006 9:53:45 PM

Here's the guide you want to go by:
http://sysbuild.corsairmemory.com/report.aspx?id=2

Don't worry... worry doesn't help anything. Face this challenge with confidence. Confidence DOES help.

Soon enough your feeling of dredd will become a feeling of triumph.
August 7, 2006 10:10:24 PM

Working with computers is like working with cars. All you need is a bit of confidence and perhaps a bit of cockyness and you'd be suprised how far that will take you.

I too was reluctant on my first build, but up untill that point I hadn't as much as replaced a drive, and with 2k on the line it scared the crap outta me. Just take thing slow and you'll be fine. It's not a race and you don't need the build to take 45 min.

As far as setting the CPU that corsair guide is an excellent source. It covers all you should ever need in that aspect.

Good luck!
August 7, 2006 10:31:58 PM

Just make sure you align the pins on the cpu correctly and mount the cooler right. Everything else is pretty much straight forward, and is just a case of following the motherboard manual for connecting everything. Don't worry about it just take your time as everyone else has said.
August 7, 2006 10:32:20 PM

Quote:
Ever since I ordered everything from Newegg I've had this overwhelming feeling of dredd hanging over my head like I just did something VERY wrong, hehe??

I just spent approx $2500.00 on a brand new system, that's everything from Case, to Ram to HD to Brand New 20.1" Acer gaming Monitor but I've never before ever actualy built a system in my life.

In the past I've worked on systems, replaced HD's, Ram, CD-Roms, whatever, you name it, but still. I guess I'm just nervous about actually building my first system, hence the feeling of dredd?

I tried to find a book to help me but there just doesn't seem to be anything out there that is up to date enough to warrant spending any amount of $$ on.

I guess as long as I take my time, watch out for static electricity it's not too hard? The one thing I've never done though is actually put the CPU into the Motherboard. Someone feel like giving me a quick run through on how to do that, or point me to a place where they have write-up on how to do that?

Thanks in advance, everything should be here by the 10th providing UPS does their job as they say they will?


I know exactly how you feel - right now I'm saving 75 bucks a week for a new system, to be built around November - Conroe2, SLI, the works.

It will be my first build, and to top it off, my nephew will bill building hte exact same system next to me - ordering, building at the same time. HD, Memory, Optical drives - installed them all but have bit of trepidation over the coming challenge of a complete build.

I remember the old days of having to frick with and figure out IRQ and DMA settings thru trial and a lot of error - hoping this is not like that. But if i get stuck I hope to come here and get some help, on these boards.

Right now my current Gateway with a Geforce4 MX (bought when my Ti board burned out a few months ago to tide me over till Nov.) is on its last legs...had to put in a new DVD drive to replace my broken CD-ROM - and just last night the RED went out on my monitor....do not know if it is the monitor (Gateway VX900) which has served me well for 8 years, the video card, or the cable. Unknown. The machine sits here wheezing like an iron lung...hope it can hold out till November!

Meantime, good luck on the rebuild!
August 7, 2006 10:40:43 PM

Quote:
Recently PC Gamer released a Magazine solely devoted to building a PC. If you go look at your local news stand or book store they might still have a copy. I saw one at my local bookstore yesterday, so your chances of finding one might be kinda good.

T_Bone


Yeah but they want like 10 bucks for it. or more.
August 7, 2006 11:39:45 PM

Don't worry about it. If you ordered all the right parts and can read a manual, you'll do fine. I did my first build at 12-13. Just don't forget to install the brass standoffs. My manual forgot to mention that part. lol.

EDIT: But it worked for a year until I upgraded again and found out.
August 8, 2006 2:49:01 PM

Thanks for all of the help, words of wisdom and vote's of confidence I sure do appreciate it! Some of the parts should start to arrive today according to the tracking information, but I cannot do anything until the 10th(except read the Motherboard manual) because that is when the case will be here. I'm sure that will be more than enough to keep me busy.

Thanks again.
August 8, 2006 2:54:22 PM

You're in for a good time. Nothing is more satisfying than taking a bunch of expensive parts, putting them together and creating a working computer, and a high performance one at that.
August 8, 2006 3:14:54 PM

congradulations! once your first system is under your belt you will never look back! Just a few tips... dont force any part into place (a firm push should be all that is needed), dont close the case until you know the PC boots up (I did it my first time, had to reopen the case 2 minutes later)... happy building
August 8, 2006 3:40:46 PM

EDIT: woot go me for not checking the original post


on topic..

the hardest part i found was putting the fan on . you feel as if you are goign to crush the cpu with those pos intel stock fan clips ( amd was much easier and alot less scary)

and the ram can hurt your fingers pushing it in hehe.

g/l
August 8, 2006 4:08:51 PM

Quote:

you just spent 2500 on a comp and wont drop 10 bucks to make sure you put it together right?


The comment about it costing $10 was not by the original poster.. LOL?

One thing I noticed on here is that people are too quick to put things together, close the case, then flip the switch only to find a POST error or something worse. Really, what happened to the days of verifying your parts outside of the case before slamming it all in there? What a mess when you have everything installed to have to start pulling things out one at a time to find the problem. Test, then build!
August 8, 2006 4:14:10 PM

Don't forget to make your install in a clean area, plain table (do not use any kind of rubber pad...) and if possible ground yourself in a piece of metal (a table leg or nearby window) to reduce the static charges on you... put the cpu with correct orientation etc...follow the cooler instruction (even stock intel cooler is hard to remove after installing) , if you will apply thermal paste, use it wiselly, do not put too much or you will have problem with the excess...
If you will use dual channel config check MB manual for correct slot distribution, place the PS connectors after all parts installed, and if you get a longer Graphics card, install it last to prevent problems with HD cables or any other cable that may need to the connectors close to GPU card position ...
but installing is not really a problem... just do it step by step... and after the install test the system and them organize the cables... after that close the case and start windows install...
August 15, 2006 5:59:20 PM

Quote:
Recently PC Gamer released a Magazine solely devoted to building a PC. If you go look at your local news stand or book store they might still have a copy. I saw one at my local bookstore yesterday, so your chances of finding one might be kinda good.

T_Bone


Was that issue called the "PC Building Bible"? I wrote them inquiring about it and they just got back to me telling me to call some 800 # to buy something called what I said above?
August 16, 2006 3:11:03 AM

If I can do it, you can do it. I'm 66 and just ordered the parts and asembled my first homebuilt. I've only got a few more cables and wires to connect (I'm going slowly and carefully with plugging in wires to terminals). The OS software should arrive tomorrow and then I can do a finally check and see if it works.

As far as the static electricity goes, the simplest thing if you're working at home is to just take your shoes and socks off and you're always grounded. Just dont stand in a puddle of water with live electric cables nearby.

You might find it easier to mount the CPU, heatsink and fan and the RAM on the board before you install it in the case. Be sure you mount that little thin piece of tin, the I.O. shield on the part of the mobo with all the output connections on it before you screw the mobo down into the case.

My manual also didn't tell me to mount the little brass offset screws into the case wall first either. A couple of the offsets might have a raised lip on them, these are to guide the mobo holes onto the offsets.

The way to mount the CPU onto the mother board is carefully and gently. It will only fit in one way and it's marked on one of the corners to match up with the CPU socket. Handle it by the edges, don't get greasy fingers on the pins underneath.

Raise the little lever first, gently lower the CPU into place, carefully position it over the pin holes and it will just fall into place. Lower the lever and it will lock into place.

If your heatsink and fan come with the CPU, it may already have the thermal material on the heat sink. Read your manuals that came with the CPU and motherboard. If not, you'll have to apply a little thermal grease or paste. That's a whole nother thing you should check with someone more knowledgable than me on that.

You can do it. Most of the parts just snap together.
August 16, 2006 3:54:03 AM

Quote:
I tried to find a book to help me but there just doesn't seem to be anything out there that is up to date enough to warrant spending any amount of $$ on.


This book is decent. It does not have the detail you need if you're new to installing the OS, so take a look at this source. Not bad for free.

Quote:
I guess as long as I take my time, watch out for static electricity it's not too hard? The one thing I've never done though is actually put the CPU into the Motherboard. Someone feel like giving me a quick run through on how to do that, or point me to a place where they have write-up on how to do that?


Installing an aftermarket HSF can be more involved than the CPU. CPU installation is typically very straightforward, like lift a lever, make sure the CPU is oriented properly, drop it in the socket and push the lever into the lock position. Done.

As a general rule, parts going into sockets and slots should not be forced. If something doesn't fit easily, then look to see if it is hanging up on an edge or something else. Finesse, not force. Same thing on cables. Be patient and observe.
August 16, 2006 4:32:21 AM

I'd really spend a few bucks on an anti-static wrist strap.
August 16, 2006 4:39:29 AM

Quote:
I'd really spend a few bucks on an anti-static wrist strap.


Absolutely. Anti-static mats are worthwhile in my opinion too.
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