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old hard drive in new comp

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  • Hard Drives
  • Windows XP
  • Storage
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August 9, 2006 3:32:24 AM

hi im thnking of building a new comp
i have a "genuine" (haha ms is funny) copy of windows and i don't want 2 b buying another copy

however, i have heard that when a hard drive that has a bootable windows xp partition is put into a new mobo, it will not boot or windows will not function, or something like that (ive heard it takes the mobo id or something)

is this true?

More about : hard drive comp

August 9, 2006 4:20:00 AM

If you are very lucky it will still boot and you'll be able to get all the new motherboard drivers installed etc without a reinstall. Otherwise you'll have to reinstall windows on the old drive.

Do you have the CD windows came with?
August 9, 2006 4:25:58 AM

If you rebuild your system completely you will have to reinstall windows even if you are reusing a hdd with windows already installed. Even if you get it to boot into windows from the old hdd, you can count on having problems with errors, system crashes and things just not running quite right.
Quote:

i have a "genuine" (haha ms is funny) copy of windows and i don't want 2 b buying another copy


I'm not quite sure what you mean by this but if you don't have (or can't get) an authentic windows disk with a usable key then that's for you to figure out. If you do though just make sure to back up everything and good luck.
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August 9, 2006 1:31:34 PM

Quote:
hi im thnking of building a new comp
i have a "genuine" (haha ms is funny) copy of windows and i don't want 2 b buying another copy

however, i have heard that when a hard drive that has a bootable windows xp partition is put into a new mobo, it will not boot or windows will not function, or something like that (ive heard it takes the mobo id or something)

is this true?


You should be able to do it fine, but as long as you are the owner of the OEM install CD and key, just take the 10 minutes and activate it over the phone. Just tell them you had some hardware failure and needed an reinstall.
August 10, 2006 12:37:55 AM

it came w/ my hp pavillion
its only a hd partition backup thingy for widnows

there's no cd
August 10, 2006 2:25:23 PM

Quote:
it came w/ my hp pavillion
its only a hd partition backup thingy for widnows

there's no cd

Yup, need to get an OEM copy. Use some type of disk tool to back up your current config like ghost, then pull the directories out you want onto to the new system.
August 10, 2006 3:46:44 PM

btw, y a oem copy
and wats it stand 4?
August 10, 2006 4:13:02 PM

Quote:

OEM - Original Equipment Manufacturer
OEM Hardware
This is the term given to a manufacturer that buys, for instance, video graphics chips and implements them in their own design.

OEM Software
When in the context of software it means that the software is sold only with a certain piece of hardware and/or the software manufacturer provides no technical support.

You will also find that OEM software usually doesn't come with a manual (or a box), if it's software you are experienced in using then having no manual won't be a problem, although most OEM software does still come with the built-in help system.

The price difference between OEM software and full retail software can be huge, so if having no box, no manual and no technical support is not a problem then it can be a bargain.

note: some OEM software is a cutdown version of its retail counterpart, always make sure the software has the features you need.
August 10, 2006 4:56:36 PM

By far the biggest difference between oem and retail is the oem license clause which states that the copy of windows XP is tied to the motherboard it was originally installed on, and cannot be transferred to a new computer/mobo, unless the original motherboard was found defective and had to be replaced.
August 10, 2006 5:34:49 PM

I've never had a hard time telling the Microsoft guy on the other end of the phone with a really harsh Indian accent named Bob that I got a virus and needed to do a fresh install.
August 10, 2006 6:33:44 PM

I agree. Generally you can probably get away with transferring an oem. It really depends on who you end up talking to on Microsoft's hotline.
August 10, 2006 7:55:37 PM

I'm going to go off topic, but I have a question for all:

This "oem transfer" we do usually works and has been great for me because I don't abuse it. So my question is, does the genuine 'BS' tool that M$ snuck into our OS's mess with process making it harder or impossible to do?
August 10, 2006 8:41:55 PM

Not that I can tell.
August 10, 2006 8:48:21 PM

People who think you can't drop XP into a totally new box are full of shit. I have done this more than 40 times in the last 5 years, making new boxes for people, and putting their old XP installation into the new box. There are NO issues with it. You will NOT have a "slow XP". You will NOT suffer "Crashes". You won't have "Duelling Driver syndrome". Geez that stuff is a load of crap.

Simply make sure that you uninstall ALL drivers before your final shutdown on the old system. That includes ALL motherboard drivers.

Then put the old OS HDD in the new system and boot.

It'll take many many restarts, but XP will work JUST FINE. And it doesn't matter if it is OEM or RETAIL XP either.

You definitely WILL have to activate windows again - and if it coughs when you try to do that online, simply ring MS. And this is important here: DO NOT TAKE ANY SHIT FROM ANY MS EMPLOYEE ABOUT MOVING XP TO A NEW PC! You tell them that the old PC has been broken up for parts, and that the reason you are moving it is because your motherboard blew up.
August 11, 2006 1:31:18 PM

Quote:
You tell them that the old PC has been broken up for parts, and that the reason you are moving it is because your motherboard blew up.


This sounds like venting! I wouldn't hold your advise to heart, there are prerqs in the form of legality that tie the OS to the owner and it's hardware. Like us all I've moved and installed many OS's and noticed that there is a percentage of the system that has to be intact to make the move, or reload. I don't know the percentages are, but know that the motherboard is a big part of it and usually disqualifies reactivation. I think you gust need to 'white lie" your way through the call.
August 11, 2006 2:17:06 PM

As far as reauthorizing the OS on the phone, I've only had to do it twice and both times the OS was either just reinstalled on the same machine or the authorization died when adding several new componenets. Neither time did I have to give any informatio on why I was reinstalling/reauthorizing. They just asked how many machines it was installed on, which of course was only 1, and then they gave me the new code.

I don't really see any call for 'not taking crap from the telephone person' etc, they are just doing a job and I doubt they are going to give you the third degree about it.
!