Best printers for photo printing on "plain paper"? (or may..

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
with video captures.

I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
needs for both black text and near-photo quality.

This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
acceptable to the client.

Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
away if you have any other questions.

Thank you all very much.
17 answers Last reply
More about best printers photo printing plain paper
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote in message
    news:Kf2te.48$_N5.11624@news.uswest.net...
    > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    > with video captures.

    I would suggest looking at the HP DeskJet 6540, see
    http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF05a/18972-236251-236261-14438-f51-357210.html .
    There is also a version with built in networking, the 6840. Printing in best
    mode these will give pretty good photos on plain paper. For best results on
    both photo and text on the same paper try a coated inkjet paper such as HP
    Premium Inkjet paper, see
    http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06c/A10-12771-215521-322565-322565-24465-16138-16139.html.
    This is about $0.10/sheet and has a finish like normal paper but is a it
    thicker and has a special coating to give better results for both text and
    color printing.

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP


    and using some inkjet coated paper such as
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > I've only got a 24"x17" shelf atop a mobile cart within
    > which to fit a Shuttle mini-pc, a flat panel monitor and a printer, so space
    > could be an issue.

    Most lasers are front feeders. It doesn't have to be on the top. Many
    if not most offer a straight path i.e. paper in the front output in the
    rear. I know WiFi isn't popular around medical equipment, but is
    ethernet an option? Print the the office color copier/laser.

    The whole business of not considering inkjet paper is well nutty esp
    considering that many inkjets when printing full color letter sized are
    bucks/page, were 69lb Kirkland photo paper is 16c a page when bought in
    a 125p pack. You could say the simple bulk of the paper would cause
    the folders to explode, but it's costs is peanuts.

    Imagine a yield 400 pages at 5% for $15 each color or $60. Then
    imagine 100% is 20pages, at $60. Now imagine an 8 color printer at
    $120 for 20 pages .

    Assuming plain paper... The Epson Stylus c86 isn't too bad on your
    usual paper. Price mark $90 to $100, $20 rebate if you are not lazy.
    Huge black for text, pigmented DuraBright ink. I think it's like $60
    to refill. Extra large black is a nice feature. But after a certain
    number of copies it has to be serviced for a diaper replacement, will
    blink won't print. I printed 5 inch circle daily for 6 months before
    my diaper overflowed. For any sort of serious work, you should pickup
    an extra just in case it needs to be serviced during it's warranty
    period, which given 3 copies a daily of text and photo, it likely will.


    I tend to argue, "Sure we can go with the $100 printer, but we'll shell
    out hundrads a month for the ink. And we'll have to pickup three,
    after all they need to be serviced after the 10th refill or so and we
    don't want down time do we. So we'll cycle two inbetween the shop
    that's 20 miles away, and when the warranty expires we can use the 3rd
    till we get another three. Or we can just get a laser, lower our text
    documents to under a cent a page and our graphics under a buck a page.
    ". -Cart count I pulled out of the air, don't have any clue how many
    carts = full diaper.

    There is also the r800 which is very nice on plain paper, but it costs
    $400... might as well go laser if you have the room.

    Both are top feeders IIRC
    One set of reviews on photo papers for the Epsons
    http://members.cox.net/rmeyer9/epson/eastwood.html

    -----

    Someone might recommend the ip5000 as far as consumer grade inkjets go.
    I have to admit, it's more cart compatible than the older i960 (very
    nice 6-color printer) which is a top feeder 6 color, but the ip6000 has
    6 color (4+2) as well and is the same basic box will fit on the cart
    shape. I don't know how any of these look on plain paper, I only have
    an ip3000 and a mp760, and either of those don't look anywhere near
    photographic quality, and the paper gets wet and warps.

    ----

    HP has some nice options but I haven't shopped for HP in some time.
    But I gotta agree with Tony on this. Many of the printers in the HP
    professional class take huge carts, a point as you are printing 3
    copies of mixed text/graphics a day. You tend to lose more from
    downtime then you'd save going with consumer grade and 15ml carts.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I note that you mentioned inkjets but it may be worthwhile looking at a colour
    laser. Many of them print excellent photographs on plain paper and the cost per
    print is much lower than an inkjet. HP and OKI make very good colour lasers,
    I'm sure that others do also but I have more experience with these vendors. OKI
    have flat paper path models which are competitively priced and have low cost of
    ownership. I have a customer who replaced an inkjet with a colour laser and
    whose printing costs have reduced by 60%, they print about 100 colour
    photographs per month and maybe 500 pages of text. They did their own cost of
    ownership analysis including all consumable parts (Drums, toner, fuser and
    transfer unit) anticipating a 3 year use of the laser, the inkjet they had been
    sold by the system provider lasted 1 month past warranty (!) because it was
    printing 600 pages a month and was poorly specified for the workload.
    If you believe an inkjet is the way to go then perhaps one of the HP
    Professional models would suit. Many of them have separate printheads and ink
    cartridges for each colour and they produce excellent results. I suspect that
    low to mid-range inkjet printers may not be the best in the long run for
    something as professional as you describe.
    Tony


    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    >I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    >endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    >as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    >a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    >captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    >"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    >with video captures.
    >
    >I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
    >I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
    >low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
    >you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    >This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >acceptable to the client.
    >
    >Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
    >some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >away if you have any other questions.
    >
    >Thank you all very much.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Tony,

    Thanks for the response. Your advice regarding the cost advantages of the
    color laser vs. the inkjet is compelling, of course. I'll look into what
    you're suggesting--unfortunately, my client here is notoriously short-term
    in his finacial thinking.

    One other question comes to my mind though regarding a color laser unit and
    that is size. Aren't most of the color laser units fairly large relative to
    most inkjet systems? I've only got a 24"x17" shelf atop a mobile cart within
    which to fit a Shuttle mini-pc, a flat panel monitor and a printer, so space
    could be an issue. Of course, I haven't eyeballed any of the newer laser
    units of the past two years or so, so perhaps they've come down in size.
    I'll have to take a gander at the specs on some of the HP and OKI color
    lasers.

    Thanks again for taking the time to help me out, Tony.

    Take care

    <Tony> wrote in message news:part1of1.1.up$NtuF1P3SZjQ@ue.ph...
    > I note that you mentioned inkjets but it may be worthwhile looking at a
    colour
    > laser. Many of them print excellent photographs on plain paper and the
    cost per
    > print is much lower than an inkjet. HP and OKI make very good colour
    lasers,
    > I'm sure that others do also but I have more experience with these
    vendors. OKI
    > have flat paper path models which are competitively priced and have low
    cost of
    > ownership. I have a customer who replaced an inkjet with a colour laser
    and
    > whose printing costs have reduced by 60%, they print about 100 colour
    > photographs per month and maybe 500 pages of text. They did their own cost
    of
    > ownership analysis including all consumable parts (Drums, toner, fuser and
    > transfer unit) anticipating a 3 year use of the laser, the inkjet they had
    been
    > sold by the system provider lasted 1 month past warranty (!) because it
    was
    > printing 600 pages a month and was poorly specified for the workload.
    > If you believe an inkjet is the way to go then perhaps one of the HP
    > Professional models would suit. Many of them have separate printheads and
    ink
    > cartridges for each colour and they produce excellent results. I suspect
    that
    > low to mid-range inkjet printers may not be the best in the long run for
    > something as professional as you describe.
    > Tony
    >
    >
    > "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    > >I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a
    color
    > >endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    near
    > >as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    with
    > >a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the
    respective
    > >captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > >view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > >"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same
    page
    > >with video captures.
    > >
    > >I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise,
    so
    > >I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way
    of
    > >low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    perhaps
    > >you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    > >needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    > >
    > >This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    > >month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    > >acceptable to the client.
    > >
    > >Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more
    info
    > >some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    > >away if you have any other questions.
    > >
    > >Thank you all very much.
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ah, you do have a space issue with a colour laser, they are much bigger than
    most inkjets. Different makes and models have different profiles but are
    certainly bigger and heavier. Maybe the HP Professional inkjets are a better
    fit for the job, they are reasonably sized and may also suit a short term
    financial view more effectively.
    Good luck
    Tony

    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    >Tony,
    >
    >Thanks for the response. Your advice regarding the cost advantages of the
    >color laser vs. the inkjet is compelling, of course. I'll look into what
    >you're suggesting--unfortunately, my client here is notoriously short-term
    >in his finacial thinking.
    >
    >One other question comes to my mind though regarding a color laser unit and
    >that is size. Aren't most of the color laser units fairly large relative to
    >most inkjet systems? I've only got a 24"x17" shelf atop a mobile cart within
    >which to fit a Shuttle mini-pc, a flat panel monitor and a printer, so space
    >could be an issue. Of course, I haven't eyeballed any of the newer laser
    >units of the past two years or so, so perhaps they've come down in size.
    >I'll have to take a gander at the specs on some of the HP and OKI color
    >lasers.
    >
    >Thanks again for taking the time to help me out, Tony.
    >
    >Take care
    >
    ><Tony> wrote in message news:part1of1.1.up$NtuF1P3SZjQ@ue.ph...
    >> I note that you mentioned inkjets but it may be worthwhile looking at a
    >colour
    >> laser. Many of them print excellent photographs on plain paper and the
    >cost per
    >> print is much lower than an inkjet. HP and OKI make very good colour
    >lasers,
    >> I'm sure that others do also but I have more experience with these
    >vendors. OKI
    >> have flat paper path models which are competitively priced and have low
    >cost of
    >> ownership. I have a customer who replaced an inkjet with a colour laser
    >and
    >> whose printing costs have reduced by 60%, they print about 100 colour
    >> photographs per month and maybe 500 pages of text. They did their own cost
    >of
    >> ownership analysis including all consumable parts (Drums, toner, fuser and
    >> transfer unit) anticipating a 3 year use of the laser, the inkjet they had
    >been
    >> sold by the system provider lasted 1 month past warranty (!) because it
    >was
    >> printing 600 pages a month and was poorly specified for the workload.
    >> If you believe an inkjet is the way to go then perhaps one of the HP
    >> Professional models would suit. Many of them have separate printheads and
    >ink
    >> cartridges for each colour and they produce excellent results. I suspect
    >that
    >> low to mid-range inkjet printers may not be the best in the long run for
    >> something as professional as you describe.
    >> Tony
    >>
    >>
    >> "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    >> >I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a
    >color
    >> >endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    >near
    >> >as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    >with
    >> >a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the
    >respective
    >> >captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >> >view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    >> >"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same
    >page
    >> >with video captures.
    >> >
    >> >I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise,
    >so
    >> >I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way
    >of
    >> >low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    >perhaps
    >> >you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >> >needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >> >
    >> >This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >> >month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >> >acceptable to the client.
    >> >
    >> >Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more
    >info
    >> >some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >> >away if you have any other questions.
    >> >
    >> >Thank you all very much.
    >>
    >>
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I would recommend a Canon IP5000 using Canon OEM ink and Hammermill
    inkjet paper. The ink can be purchased at Costco and the paper is sold
    at Office Depot and Staples. For better photo quality I would recommend
    Epson matte paper; either single or double sided. The reverse side can
    be used for more text and the printer has dual paper feed and duplex
    printing mode.

    JSteele wrote:

    >I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    >endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    >as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    >a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    >captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    >"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    >with video captures.
    >
    >I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
    >I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
    >low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
    >you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    >This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >acceptable to the client.
    >
    >Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
    >some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >away if you have any other questions.
    >
    >Thank you all very much.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    An argument for the Color Laser might be that of printout durability as well
    as dependability. (no nozzle clogging)
    The basic "footprint" for many of the current lasers is no more than that
    for some of the larger ink jet/ bubble jet printers.
    On the other hand , some of the inkjet printers are so cheap with discounts
    that you can buy a new one for about the same price as the set of
    replacement ink tanks. IE $99 for a new printer with ink tanks, $59 for a
    set of ink tanks.
    (Buy them by the dozen?)

    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote in message
    news:Kf2te.48$_N5.11624@news.uswest.net...
    > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    > near
    > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    > with
    > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    > with video captures.
    >
    > I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise,
    > so
    > I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way
    > of
    > low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    > perhaps
    > you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    > needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    > This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    > month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    > acceptable to the client.
    >
    > Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more
    > info
    > some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    > away if you have any other questions.
    >
    > Thank you all very much.
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi once more,
    You will have seen a post from measekite who recommends the ip5000.
    This printer has the finest nozzles available on the market (I think) and this
    technology (1pcl) is yet to be proven, in my business I have seen several
    ip5000's go back to the manufacturer under warranty all with print quality
    problems, on the other hand I have not seen any ip4000's in for warranty
    repairs and more of them have been sold. I am beginning to wonder if there is a
    problem with the 1pcl technology, just an observation. The quality of the
    ip4000 colour prints is very high and I doubt if the ip5000 offers any
    advantages in the situation you are describing. I speak from actual experience
    with the reliability of these printers and not from a position of entrenchment.
    I own an ip4000 and it is a great printer for the home environment. Having said
    that, I do not think that the Canon PIXMA series is aimed at the professional
    market, the HP Business Inkjet series
    (http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236251-236261-24728-f51-411179.html)
    certainly is and I still think the extra cost will buy long term benefit in
    terms of reliability and much cheaper replacement of the individual print heads
    if they ever fail. Canon printhead replacement is a costly exercise and many
    say not worthwhile. HP 11 individual printheads have an anticipated life of
    16000 pages approx, I don't think Canon will tell you what their print head
    life expectancy is. Horses for Courses in my opinion, professional printers for
    professinal applications!
    Tony


    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    >I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    >endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    >as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    >a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    >captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    >"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    >with video captures.
    >
    >I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
    >I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
    >low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
    >you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    >This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >acceptable to the client.
    >
    >Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
    >some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >away if you have any other questions.
    >
    >Thank you all very much.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Tony wrote:

    >Hi once more,
    >You will have seen a post from measekite who recommends the ip5000.
    >This printer has the finest nozzles available on the market (I think) and this
    >technology (1pcl) is yet to be proven, in my business I have seen several
    >ip5000's go back to the manufacturer under warranty all with print quality
    >problems, on the other hand I have not seen any ip4000's in for warranty
    >repairs and more of them have been sold. I am beginning to wonder if there is a
    >problem with the 1pcl technology, just an observation. The quality of the
    >ip4000 colour prints is very high and I doubt if the ip5000 offers any
    >advantages
    >

    Not for photos but for business documents.

    >in the situation you are describing. I speak from actual experience
    >with the reliability of these printers and not from a position of entrenchment.
    >I own an ip4000 and it is a great printer for the home environment. Having said
    >that, I do not think that the Canon PIXMA series is aimed at the professional
    >market, the HP Business Inkjet series
    >(http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF25a/18972-236251-236261-24728-f51-411179.html)
    >certainly is and I still think the extra cost will buy long term benefit in
    >terms of reliability and much cheaper replacement of the individual print heads
    >if they ever fail. Canon printhead replacement is a costly exercise and many
    >say not worthwhile. HP 11 individual printheads have an anticipated life of
    >16000 pages approx, I don't think Canon will tell you what their print head
    >life expectancy is. Horses for Courses in my opinion, professional printers for
    >professinal applications!
    >Tony
    >
    >
    >"JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    >>endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    >>as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    >>a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    >>captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >>view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    >>"photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    >>with video captures.
    >>
    >>I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
    >>I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
    >>low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
    >>you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >>needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >>
    >>This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >>month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >>acceptable to the client.
    >>
    >>Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
    >>some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >>away if you have any other questions.
    >>
    >>Thank you all very much.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote in message
    news:Kf2te.48$_N5.11624@news.uswest.net...
    > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    near
    > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    with
    > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    > with video captures.

    One word of caution....

    If the image source is a standard resolution video camera don't expect very
    good photo quality prints. Low resolution images that look good on screen
    can look very poor quality when printed - no matter how good the printer or
    paper is. There is something about the backlit nature of on-screen images
    that causes this. Make sure you demo to the client before you commit to
    purchase the printer.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Your client is somewhat confused. Using matte coated stock which costs
    about 5 cent per page can provide him with both photo quality images and
    great text. In fact, most inkjet printers today can give quite
    reasonable image results on simple "inkjet bond paper" costing under a
    cent per page (again both text and images).

    Permanence of the image may be a more important consideration. If the
    image doesn't require permanence under light exposure, then any of the
    many brands will provide him with the results he needs. If he requires
    permanence and waterproof inks and plain paper printing, I would suggest
    certain Epson models (using Durabrite inks), but if the printer is
    getting intermittent use, it may develop head clogs. If he needs
    permanence with specialty papers, HP is fine and less likely to clog.
    If he doesn't require permanence, or if the images are mainly going to
    be in file folders or in subdued lighting, Epson dye ink printers or
    Canon or HP would be fine. I cannot suggest Lexmark, as their inkjet
    printers tend to be somewhat poor builds, and drivers can be difficult.

    I would suggest a middle price range model, not only will it be a better
    build, but ink costs tend to drip with middle priced machines, where low
    end models are not as reliable, and the ink cartridge costs considerably
    more, in general.

    Art


    JSteele wrote:

    > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as near
    > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along with
    > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    > with video captures.
    >
    > I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise, so
    > I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way of
    > low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or, perhaps
    > you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    > needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    > This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    > month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    > acceptable to the client.
    >
    > Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more info
    > some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    > away if you have any other questions.
    >
    > Thank you all very much.
    >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Space can be an issue. There are a few color laser printers which have
    been "shrunk" of late. Konica Minolta and OkiData both have smaller units.

    Art

    JSteele wrote:

    > Tony,
    >
    > Thanks for the response. Your advice regarding the cost advantages of the
    > color laser vs. the inkjet is compelling, of course. I'll look into what
    > you're suggesting--unfortunately, my client here is notoriously short-term
    > in his finacial thinking.
    >
    > One other question comes to my mind though regarding a color laser unit and
    > that is size. Aren't most of the color laser units fairly large relative to
    > most inkjet systems? I've only got a 24"x17" shelf atop a mobile cart within
    > which to fit a Shuttle mini-pc, a flat panel monitor and a printer, so space
    > could be an issue. Of course, I haven't eyeballed any of the newer laser
    > units of the past two years or so, so perhaps they've come down in size.
    > I'll have to take a gander at the specs on some of the HP and OKI color
    > lasers.
    >
    > Thanks again for taking the time to help me out, Tony.
    >
    > Take care
    >
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > Your client is somewhat confused. Using matte coated stock which
    > costs about 5 cent per page can provide him with both photo quality
    > images and great text.


    I think so.

    > In fact, most inkjet printers today can give quite reasonable image
    > results on simple "inkjet bond paper" costing under a cent per page
    > (again both text and images)


    Depends what reasonable is. Matte is better.

    > .
    >
    > Permanence of the image may be a more important consideration. If the
    > image doesn't require permanence under light exposure, then any of the
    > many brands will provide him with the results he needs. If he
    > requires permanence and waterproof inks and plain paper printing, I
    > would suggest certain Epson models (using Durabrite inks), but if the
    > printer is getting intermittent use, it may develop head clogs. If he
    > needs permanence with specialty papers, HP is fine and less likely to
    > clog. If he doesn't require permanence, or if the images are mainly
    > going to be in file folders or in subdued lighting, Epson dye ink
    > printers or Canon or HP would be fine. I cannot suggest Lexmark, as
    > their inkjet printers tend to be somewhat poor builds, and drivers can
    > be difficult.
    >
    > I would suggest a middle price range model, not only will it be a
    > better build, but ink costs tend to drip with middle priced machines,
    > where low end models are not as reliable, and the ink cartridge costs
    > considerably more, in general.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > JSteele wrote:
    >
    >> I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a
    >> color
    >> endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality
    >> (as near
    >> as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper
    >> along with
    >> a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the
    >> respective
    >> captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    >> view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any
    >> sort of
    >> "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same
    >> page
    >> with video captures.
    >>
    >> I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of
    >> expertise, so
    >> I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the
    >> way of
    >> low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    >> perhaps
    >> you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    >> needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >>
    >> This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    >> month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    >> acceptable to the client.
    >>
    >> Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's
    >> more info
    >> some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    >> away if you have any other questions.
    >>
    >> Thank you all very much.
    >>
    >>
    >>
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "zakezuke" <zakezuke_us@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1119160034.726752.185710@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > > I've only got a 24"x17" shelf atop a mobile cart within
    > > which to fit a Shuttle mini-pc, a flat panel monitor and a printer, so
    space
    > > could be an issue.
    >
    > Most lasers are front feeders. It doesn't have to be on the top. Many
    > if not most offer a straight path i.e. paper in the front output in the
    > rear. I know WiFi isn't popular around medical equipment, but is
    > ethernet an option? Print the the office color copier/laser.

    The entire video capture and printing system has to be self-contained
    because the client's business is mobile, so that isn't an option. He's a vet
    and his clients are other vets who are tending to animals that require,
    among other things, endoscopies, so he has to travel to many different
    clinics across the city. He needs to be able to print up video captures from
    the endoscopy at each of the various clinics and offices in which he uses
    the camera.


    > The whole business of not considering inkjet paper is well nutty esp
    > considering that many inkjets when printing full color letter sized are
    > bucks/page, were 69lb Kirkland photo paper is 16c a page when bought in
    > a 125p pack. You could say the simple bulk of the paper would cause
    > the folders to explode, but it's costs is peanuts.
    >
    > Imagine a yield 400 pages at 5% for $15 each color or $60. Then
    > imagine 100% is 20pages, at $60. Now imagine an 8 color printer at
    > $120 for 20 pages .
    >
    > Assuming plain paper... The Epson Stylus c86 isn't too bad on your
    > usual paper. Price mark $90 to $100, $20 rebate if you are not lazy.
    > Huge black for text, pigmented DuraBright ink. I think it's like $60
    > to refill. Extra large black is a nice feature. But after a certain
    > number of copies it has to be serviced for a diaper replacement, will
    > blink won't print. I printed 5 inch circle daily for 6 months before
    > my diaper overflowed. For any sort of serious work, you should pickup
    > an extra just in case it needs to be serviced during it's warranty
    > period, which given 3 copies a daily of text and photo, it likely will.
    >
    Thanks for the advice. Several of the Epson Stylus printers that use
    DuraBright are on my growing list.


    > I tend to argue, "Sure we can go with the $100 printer, but we'll shell
    > out hundrads a month for the ink. And we'll have to pickup three,
    > after all they need to be serviced after the 10th refill or so and we
    > don't want down time do we. So we'll cycle two inbetween the shop
    > that's 20 miles away, and when the warranty expires we can use the 3rd
    > till we get another three. Or we can just get a laser, lower our text
    > documents to under a cent a page and our graphics under a buck a page.
    > ". -Cart count I pulled out of the air, don't have any clue how many
    > carts = full diaper.
    >
    > There is also the r800 which is very nice on plain paper, but it costs
    > $400... might as well go laser if you have the room.
    >
    > Both are top feeders IIRC
    > One set of reviews on photo papers for the Epsons
    > http://members.cox.net/rmeyer9/epson/eastwood.html
    >
    > -----
    >
    > Someone might recommend the ip5000 as far as consumer grade inkjets go.
    > I have to admit, it's more cart compatible than the older i960 (very
    > nice 6-color printer) which is a top feeder 6 color, but the ip6000 has
    > 6 color (4+2) as well and is the same basic box will fit on the cart
    > shape. I don't know how any of these look on plain paper, I only have
    > an ip3000 and a mp760, and either of those don't look anywhere near
    > photographic quality, and the paper gets wet and warps.
    >
    > ----
    >
    > HP has some nice options but I haven't shopped for HP in some time.
    > But I gotta agree with Tony on this. Many of the printers in the HP
    > professional class take huge carts, a point as you are printing 3
    > copies of mixed text/graphics a day. You tend to lose more from
    > downtime then you'd save going with consumer grade and 15ml carts.
    >
    >
    Thanks a ton for taking the time to respond to my post. Really appreciate
    all your info and advice.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Very helpful info, Arthur. Will pass it on to the client in my next meeting
    with him.

    Really appreciate your advice. Thanks.


    "Arthur Entlich" <e-printerhelp@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:n2ete.1741957$6l.1535057@pd7tw2no...
    > Your client is somewhat confused. Using matte coated stock which costs
    > about 5 cent per page can provide him with both photo quality images and
    > great text. In fact, most inkjet printers today can give quite
    > reasonable image results on simple "inkjet bond paper" costing under a
    > cent per page (again both text and images).
    >
    > Permanence of the image may be a more important consideration. If the
    > image doesn't require permanence under light exposure, then any of the
    > many brands will provide him with the results he needs. If he requires
    > permanence and waterproof inks and plain paper printing, I would suggest
    > certain Epson models (using Durabrite inks), but if the printer is
    > getting intermittent use, it may develop head clogs. If he needs
    > permanence with specialty papers, HP is fine and less likely to clog.
    > If he doesn't require permanence, or if the images are mainly going to
    > be in file folders or in subdued lighting, Epson dye ink printers or
    > Canon or HP would be fine. I cannot suggest Lexmark, as their inkjet
    > printers tend to be somewhat poor builds, and drivers can be difficult.
    >
    > I would suggest a middle price range model, not only will it be a better
    > build, but ink costs tend to drip with middle priced machines, where low
    > end models are not as reliable, and the ink cartridge costs considerably
    > more, in general.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > JSteele wrote:
    >
    > > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a
    color
    > > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    near
    > > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    with
    > > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the
    respective
    > > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort
    of
    > > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same
    page
    > > with video captures.
    > >
    > > I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of
    expertise, so
    > > I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the
    way of
    > > low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    perhaps
    > > you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    > > needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    > >
    > > This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    > > month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    > > acceptable to the client.
    > >
    > > Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more
    info
    > > some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    > > away if you have any other questions.
    > >
    > > Thank you all very much.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Don't mean to get all warm and fuzzy on you but it sure does my heart good
    to get so many informed responses to my original post. Just wanted to let
    you all know how very much I appreciate the time and effort you made on this
    subject.

    Will be assembling the video capture system by week's end and most likely
    start tests with various papers and printers next week, so I'll post a
    wrap-up to this thread soon to let you know how it all turns out.

    Thanks again.


    "JSteele" <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> wrote in message
    news:Kf2te.48$_N5.11624@news.uswest.net...
    > I'm currently putting together a portable video capture system for a color
    > endoscopy camera. The client wants to be able to print good quality (as
    near
    > as photo quality as reasonably possible) frame captures on paper along
    with
    > a black text letterhead and some descriptive comments about the respective
    > captures. He wants to be able to print on "plain paper" because, in his
    > view, it's more affordable and he's under the impression that any sort of
    > "photo paper" won't allow him to print quality black text on the same page
    > with video captures.
    >
    > I'm frankly lost. Printers and paper stocks are not my area of expertise,
    so
    > I'm looking for your help and advice. What would you recommend in the way
    of
    > low to mid range priced inkjet printers that would fit the bill? Or,
    perhaps
    > you have a recommendation for a type of paper stock which will meet his
    > needs for both black text and near-photo quality.
    >
    > This printer, btw, would print, on average, only about 80-100 pages per
    > month, so even higher cost inks and paper stock would most likely be
    > acceptable to the client.
    >
    > Would really appreciate help on this issue. I imagine that there's more
    info
    > some of you might need in order to make a recommendation, so please fire
    > away if you have any other questions.
    >
    > Thank you all very much.
    >
    >
    >
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In message <aQHte.110$l36.5001@news.uswest.net>, JSteele
    <jmsteele@REMOVEqwest.net> writes
    >
    >The entire video capture and printing system has to be self-contained
    >because the client's business is mobile, so that isn't an option. He's a vet
    >and his clients are other vets who are tending to animals that require,
    >among other things, endoscopies, so he has to travel to many different
    >clinics across the city. He needs to be able to print up video captures from
    >the endoscopy at each of the various clinics and offices in which he uses
    >the camera.
    >
    I don't know whether this has occurred to you but there are/were
    portable printers, which can run off a battery, or at least off the
    cigarette lighter in the car to be really portable. When I last looked
    at these sort of things Canon had quite a few but that was six/seven
    years ago.

    --
    Timothy
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