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Fail-open ethernet card

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  • Ethernet Card
  • Firewalls
  • Network Card
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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Anonymous
June 15, 2004 6:54:09 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Hi,

I'm looking for a dual Ethernet network card that will fail-open -
i.e. if it is installed on a machine that functions as a bridge (or
firewall) will allow all traffic to go right through in the event that
the machine loses its power.

Any help is greatly appreciated,
-Ron

More about : fail open ethernet card

Anonymous
June 16, 2004 4:53:33 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <4c49f410.0406151354.3488b693@posting.google.com>,
Ron Ben-Natan <rbennata@hotmail.com> wrote:
:I'm looking for a dual Ethernet network card that will fail-open -
:i.e. if it is installed on a machine that functions as a bridge (or
:firewall) will allow all traffic to go right through in the event that
:the machine loses its power.

That is a rather unusual requirement, the opposite situation of most
security recommendations. If you don't mind satisfying my curiosity,
could you explain why you would want that behaviour?
--
How does Usenet function without a fixed point?
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 5:02:32 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <4c49f410.0406151354.3488b693@posting.google.com>,
rbennata@hotmail.com says...
> Hi,
>
> I'm looking for a dual Ethernet network card that will fail-open -
> i.e. if it is installed on a machine that functions as a bridge (or
> firewall) will allow all traffic to go right through in the event that
> the machine loses its power.
>
> Any help is greatly appreciated,


If you have packeteer (and like) devices, crack it open and take a look.


--

hsb

"Somehow I imagined this experience would be more rewarding" Calvin
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Anonymous
June 16, 2004 7:36:46 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Hansang Bae <uonr@alp.ee.pbz> wrote
> In article <4c49f410.0406151354.3488b693@posting.google.com>,
> rbennata@hotmail.com says...
> > Hi,
> >
> > I'm looking for a dual Ethernet network card that will fail-open -
> > i.e. if it is installed on a machine that functions as a bridge (or
> > firewall) will allow all traffic to go right through in the event that
> > the machine loses its power.
> >
> > Any help is greatly appreciated,
>
>
> If you have packeteer (and like) devices, crack it open and take a look.

There are a couple of things:-

There was a thing called an Optical Bypass Switch for FDDI. They were
horrendously costly and only did one fiber each. I suspect that they
were activated by a 5V output from the device being bypassed.
If you used ehternet over the appropriate fiber the bypass relay would
IIRC work OK. See paragraph below for some details of
how to fudge up the activation of the relay.


Token ring MAUs did this sort of thing with a relay.

If you were desperate enough you could just try it with a few relays.

IIRC a PC provides 5V from certain pins on the parallel port, 12V
from certain pins on keyboard and mouse ports, + and - 12V is
available
from serial ports. So you could fairly easily connect a few relays up
to
some patch leads and give it a go. If you can try 10M as well as 100M.
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 3:26:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In news:4c49f410.0406151354.3488b693@posting.google.com,
> I'm looking for a dual Ethernet network card that will fail-open -
> i.e. if it is installed on a machine that functions as a bridge (or
> firewall) will allow all traffic to go right through in the event that
> the machine loses its power.

Similar functionality is implemented in add-drop multiplexers with
normally-closed relay between the input and output ports.

--
Pero Volarevic
Anonymous
June 16, 2004 6:41:13 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"AnyBody43" <anybody43@hotmail.com> wrote:

> There was a thing called an Optical Bypass Switch for FDDI. They were
> horrendously costly and only did one fiber each. I suspect that they
> were activated by a 5V output from the device being bypassed.

The reason for these was that in ring topologies, all hosts of the
network were in series. Power down one host and the network wraps (if
the ring was a dual ring network). Power down two hosts, and now you
have segmented the dual-ring network.

Switches are supposed to eliminate those problems. Hosts can be powered
down without affecting the rest of the network. And the switches
themselves can be configured in a survivable mesh, can be backed up with
UPS, and can even be internally redundant.

For good survivability, rather than looking for a switch that can bypass
itself, I'd look for a topology in which switches are arranged in a well
distributed mesh, each switch is kept rather small so as not to affect a
huge number of hosts if it goes down, and I'd also install an UPS with
each switch. If you want to go big bucks, look for internally redundant
switches.

Bert
Anonymous
September 3, 2009 10:17:19 PM

NetOptics failopen bypass switch is great for this rather than having failopen on a NIC($2000 or so):
http://www.netoptics.com/products/product_family_details.asp?cid=8&pid=186&Section=products&menuitem=8&tag=NetOptics+iBypass+Bypass

however Failopen NIC I'd recommend ($300):
http://www.interfacemasters.com/products/2265.html

Quote:
Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"AnyBody43" <anybody43@hotmail.com> wrote:

> There was a thing called an Optical Bypass Switch for FDDI. They were
> horrendously costly and only did one fiber each. I suspect that they
> were activated by a 5V output from the device being bypassed.

The reason for these was that in ring topologies, all hosts of the
network were in series. Power down one host and the network wraps (if
the ring was a dual ring network). Power down two hosts, and now you
have segmented the dual-ring network.

Switches are supposed to eliminate those problems. Hosts can be powered
down without affecting the rest of the network. And the switches
themselves can be configured in a survivable mesh, can be backed up with
UPS, and can even be internally redundant.

For good survivability, rather than looking for a switch that can bypass
itself, I'd look for a topology in which switches are arranged in a well
distributed mesh, each switch is kept rather small so as not to affect a
huge number of hosts if it goes down, and I'd also install an UPS with
each switch. If you want to go big bucks, look for internally redundant
switches.

Bert

!