Chain two routers, can't route between 10.x and 192.168.x?

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I am trying to connect two routers together.

Router A is connected to Router B.

Outside world:
A: DSL Modem + Router (Verizon DSL)
DHCP Enabled (192.168.0.x range)
LAN Address: 192.168.0.1
These settings can't be changed, I don't want Verizon to be
surprised when they do a checkup, so have to leave this router alone
(can't change to bridged mode, for example).

Option 1: Router B WAN port connects to (A). Use as a router.
B-1: "broadband" router (D-Link)
WAN address is 192.168.0.x
LAN address set to 10.0.0.1
DHCP enabled: 10.0.0.x range

This is how I would like it, but it does not work - machines connected
to router B cannot get out to 192.168.0.x or the Internet - so my
question is,
should this work? I am not sure if the router will route 192.168.0.x
addresses over from the 10.x range - given that both of these ranges
are "non-routable"?

This option works - but I can't use the router B firewall and URL
filtering
etc:

Option 2: Router B LAN port connects to (A). Use as a switch only.
B-2: "broadband" router (D-Link)
WAN address is immaterial.
LAN address set to 192.168.0.2
DHCP disabled
4 answers Last reply
More about chain routers route
  1. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    In article <75cc51dd.0406170815.214eb197@posting.google.com>,
    B Wooster <bwooster47@hotmail.com> wrote:
    :I am trying to connect two routers together.
    :Outside world:
    : LAN Address: 192.168.0.1

    : Option 1: Router B WAN port connects to (A). Use as a router.
    : WAN address is 192.168.0.x
    : LAN address set to 10.0.0.1

    :This is how I would like it, but it does not work - machines connected
    :to router B cannot get out to 192.168.0.x or the Internet - so my
    :question is,
    :should this work?

    You need Router B to do Network Address Translation (NAT) in order to get
    that to work. If you have NAT turned on, then what router A will
    see will be 192.168.0.x Ip addresses, and as far as it is concerned
    there won't be any difficulties in routing those. [It will probably
    NAT them again into a real IP adddress.]

    The mechanism to enable NAT on router B varies greatly with the manufacturer
    and model and software revision, so I can't offer advice without more
    specifics.
    --
    Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct,
    not tried it. -- Donald Knuth
  2. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    roberson@ibd.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca (Walter Roberson) wrote in message news:<casjeb$he6$1@canopus.cc.umanitoba.ca>...
    > In article <75cc51dd.0406170815.214eb197@posting.google.com>,
    > B Wooster <bwooster47@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > :I am trying to connect two routers together.
    > :Outside world:
    > : LAN Address: 192.168.0.1
    > : Option 1: Router B WAN port connects to (A). Use as a router.
    > : WAN address is 192.168.0.x
    > : LAN address set to 10.0.0.1

    > You need Router B to do Network Address Translation (NAT) in order to get
    > that to work. If you have NAT turned on, then what router A will
    > see will be 192.168.0.x Ip addresses, and as far as it is concerned
    > there won't be any difficulties in routing those. [It will probably
    > NAT them again into a real IP adddress.]

    Right - you also said I should turn on NAT - this is a DLink Broadband
    router (wireless + 4 ports). It does not have any specific commands to
    run, but I am sure it has to use NAT if I configure it the way I
    described above - WAN is set to DHCP, and it picks up a 192.168.0.2
    address, and LAN is set to 10.0.0.1, and DHCP on router B is set for
    the 10.0.0.x range.

    Anyone have thoughts on whether this should work? I am not an expert,
    so was not sure if the router B would do NAT on the 10.x range, pass
    it as a 192.168.0.2 address up the WAN port to router A...
  3. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    B Wooster wrote:
    (snip)

    > Right - you also said I should turn on NAT - this is a DLink Broadband
    > router (wireless + 4 ports). It does not have any specific commands to
    > run, but I am sure it has to use NAT if I configure it the way I
    > described above - WAN is set to DHCP, and it picks up a 192.168.0.2
    > address, and LAN is set to 10.0.0.1, and DHCP on router B is set for
    > the 10.0.0.x range.

    > Anyone have thoughts on whether this should work? I am not an expert,
    > so was not sure if the router B would do NAT on the 10.x range, pass
    > it as a 192.168.0.2 address up the WAN port to router A...

    It sounds to me like it should work, at least for the
    settings give. Does router B set a default route to
    router A?

    Can you ping router A from 10.0.0.x hosts?

    Is DNS and such configured properly?

    -- glen
  4. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote in message news:<XFzAc.109876$3x.28854@attbi_s54>...
    > B Wooster wrote:
    > (snip)
    > > Anyone have thoughts on whether this should work? I am not an expert,
    > > so was not sure if the router B would do NAT on the 10.x range, pass
    > > it as a 192.168.0.2 address up the WAN port to router A...
    >
    > It sounds to me like it should work, at least for the
    > settings give. Does router B set a default route to
    > router A?
    > Can you ping router A from 10.0.0.x hosts?
    > Is DNS and such configured properly?
    > -- glen

    Thanks for the help, it now works. After spending two days trying, I
    did a hard reset on all routers, cleaned up computer IP settings, now
    both options work. Since many Google postings on chaining home routers
    say to use LAN connections (with cross over cable), here's how to make
    the LAN to WAN connection:

    Router+Switch A connects to Internet (DSL or Cable Modem).
    Set the WAN as required by DSL or Cable Modem provider, and set LAN on
    a different subnet than the WAN address. Use firewall, filtering, etc
    capabilities of this router.

    1) Router+Switch B - use as a router, to create another private
    network.
    Connect LAN from Router A to WAN port on Router B. Use a subnet
    completely different from rest of network, WAN settings should be as
    required by the LAN on RouterA. This will allow use of firewall on
    this router, but note that the computers connected to Router A will
    not see the computers on Router B.

    2) Router+Switch B - use a switch only, on same network as the LAN
    side of Router A. Use a cross over cable to connect LAN port on Router
    A to LAN port of Router B. No firewall capability on Router B now, and
    WAN port is unused.

    I ended up with option 2, because I wanted all computers in my home on
    the same network and be able to see everyone. Router+Switch B is a
    DLink wireless box, so life is now cool with wireless ....

    Thanks for the help.
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