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Virtualization Technology Support???

Last response: in CPUs
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August 11, 2006 11:09:01 PM

what is Virtualization Technology Support?


i am looking to get the AMD athlon 64 x2 4200
but there are 2 of them that are exactly the same price...
but the only diffrent that i can see is the VTS thing.

Which One Should I GET??




AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Manchester 2000MHz HT Socket 939 Dual Core Processor Model ADA4200BVBOX - Retail

# 64 bit Support: Yes
Hyper-Transport Support: Yes
L1 Cache: 128KB+128KB
L2 Cache: 2 x 512KB
Multi-Core: Dual-Core
Operating Frequency: 2.2GHz
Process Type: 90 nm
Series: Athlon 64 X2
Virtualization Technology Support: No
Vista Ready: Yes
# Model #: ADA4200BVBOX
# Item #: N82E16819103547



AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ Windsor 2000MHz HT Socket AM2 Dual Core Processor Model ADA4200CUBOX - Retail

# 64 bit Support: Yes
Hyper-Transport Support: Yes
L1 Cache: 128KB+128KB
L2 Cache: 2 x 512KB
Multi-Core: Dual-Core
Operating Frequency: 2.2GHz
Process Type: 90 nm
Series: Athlon 64 X2
Virtualization Technology Support: Yes
Vista Ready: Yes
# Model #: ADA4200CUBOX
# Item #: N82E16819103747
August 11, 2006 11:25:36 PM

well, the one with VTS requires a different socket motherboard, socket AM2... which also requires DDR2 memory then... ...its the replacement for socket 939, which only takes DDR1 memory

so, if you have a socket 939 based system, and are looking to upgrade your cpu to dual core, go with the manchester based core then

otherwise though... if youre completely overhauling your computer, to replace your motherboard, memory, all that... then the windsor core would be a better alternative
August 11, 2006 11:27:30 PM

Virtualization is actually quite an interesting feature. Usually you only get to use it on servers. What it allows you to do is to run more than 1 operating system at the same time. This is not to be confused with a multi-boot which only runs one at the startup. For example: you have an XP machine but with a simple keystroke or sequence of keystrokes you can open up something similar to a new window that has say... linux. I'm not too familiar with the details but I hope that helps.
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August 11, 2006 11:28:15 PM

ok :-) thanks. yeah. im building my computer from scratch. i just realized that the socket is diffrent. other than the socket. what is Virtualization tech support?? im going to get the windsor one, im using a x2 socket SLI MB.
August 11, 2006 11:29:56 PM

Quote:
Virtualization is actually quite an interesting feature. Usually you only get to use it on servers. What it allows you to do is to run more than 1 operating system at the same time. This is not to be confused with a multi-boot which only runs one at the startup. For example: you have an XP machine but with a simple keystroke or sequence of keystrokes you can open up something similar to a new window that has say... linux. I'm not too familiar with the details but I hope that helps.


i kinda get it... i dont think i would use it though. ive never used linux before. ill stick with my single xp. lol.
August 11, 2006 11:56:20 PM

It's very useful say for instance if you run linux as your main os and run windows in virtualization mode so you can play the latest games :) 

With hardware accelerated virtualization it should be about the same performance as running native.
August 12, 2006 4:12:18 AM

Well you don't necessarily have to use Linux. Let's look at a more practical example: You have XP Pro x64 but a lot of your hardware and some programs don't support it right? Virtualize a 32-bit version of XP to run anything that won't run on x64 while still having an upgradable path with x64.
August 12, 2006 11:42:52 AM

Quote:
You have XP Pro x64 but a lot of your hardware and some programs don't support it right? Virtualize a 32-bit version of XP to run anything that won't run on x64 while still having an upgradable path with x64.


In theory that could work, but that's not how these hypervisors work right now (I could be wrong) - you hosting OS has to have all the drivers, etc.. for the virtualized OS to work...
August 12, 2006 11:57:00 AM

Outta curiosity, is there any real difference between Vanderpool and Pacifica?
August 12, 2006 12:26:14 PM

Quote:
You have XP Pro x64 but a lot of your hardware and some programs don't support it right? Virtualize a 32-bit version of XP to run anything that won't run on x64 while still having an upgradable path with x64.


In theory that could work, but that's not how these hypervisors work right now (I could be wrong) - you hosting OS has to have all the drivers, etc.. for the virtualized OS to work...

You're _not_ wrong. The OS that the machine is booted with should have all the necessary drivers, the virtualized OS cannot provide drivers.

The virtualized OS runs in a virtual machine with _virtual hardware_ and that is all it sees (there is one optimization that causes one exception to this rule and it has to do with hard drives). For instance, the VMware virtual box virtualizes a motherboard based on the 440bx chipset, when Windows or Linux is installed in the VM, it believes that it is running on a 440bx platform. The 440bx platform is all the virtualized OS sees, therefore there is *no* way for it to provide drivers to hardware it doesn't even know is there.

Creating a working VM (like VMware did) truly requires talented programmers that create software to work around some really difficult situations. VT in the CPU simplifies the software as well as making it more efficient. That said, I don't think VT will allow games to be played well in a VM, at least not until a version of DirectX comes along with support for that specific feature.

As far as a feature, VT is along the lines of VF. VF is a CPU flag provided by 386 class processors that simplifies the management of interrupts in virtual x86 mode (it is used to virtualize hardware interrupts in a DOS box - which is a much simpler type of VM). VT on the other hand, makes it easier to create and manage a VM that hosts another protected mode operating system. In other words, VT is nice to have, may even become a great thing to have in the future but, it isn't something that users will directly benefit from. Programmers will benefit from it, create better VM software which in turn will benefit users.

HTH.
!