Ethernet Nightmares!

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Hey,
I have a small problem.
I have 2 PCs:

The first is running Windows 2000 Advanced Server(lets call it PC-A). I have
assigned it the IP address 192.168.0.1 (no DHCP involved).

The second (PC-B) is running Windows 98 on an IP of 192.168.0.2.

I have an 8-port ethernet switch which connects the two with standard RJ-45
CAT5.

Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping
both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.

Can anyone help me with this problem? Could it be a cable problem? or the
switch? or my settings?

Help....
Connell
17 answers Last reply
More about ethernet nightmares
  1. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:

    > Hey,
    > I have a small problem.
    > I have 2 PCs:
    >
    > The first is running Windows 2000 Advanced Server(lets call it PC-A).
    I have
    > assigned it the IP address 192.168.0.1 (no DHCP involved).
    >
    > The second (PC-B) is running Windows 98 on an IP of 192.168.0.2.
    >
    > I have an 8-port ethernet switch which connects the two with standard
    RJ-45
    > CAT5.
    >
    > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A.
    I
    > cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can
    ping
    > both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this problem? Could it be a cable problem? or
    the
    > switch? or my settings?

    Should work. Since you're not using DHCP, are you sure the IP
    configuration in each PC is correct? For example, what did you set the
    IP mask to in each PC? I'd use 255.255.255.0 for this address group,
    although this isn't the only possibility. My guess is that PC-A is not
    configured correctly. Maybe the mask is set to 255.255.255.255, for
    example. I've seen that happen.

    Possibly, you can also try to eliminate the switch and use a cross-over
    cable between the two PCs. But I really don't see why the switch would
    be the problem here.

    Bert
  2. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Firewall on either? Trusted zone defined to include those addresses?

    More than one interface on PC-A? Both with static addresses? Change the
    unused one to Automatic address.....

    Not as likely cable or switch since the one ping does work entailing
    communications in both directions.


    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cbsfdl$slo$1@news8.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > Hey,
    > I have a small problem.
    > I have 2 PCs:
    >
    > The first is running Windows 2000 Advanced Server(lets call it PC-A). I
    have
    > assigned it the IP address 192.168.0.1 (no DHCP involved).
    >
    > The second (PC-B) is running Windows 98 on an IP of 192.168.0.2.
    >
    > I have an 8-port ethernet switch which connects the two with standard
    RJ-45
    > CAT5.
    >
    > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
    > cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping
    > both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this problem? Could it be a cable problem? or the
    > switch? or my settings?
    >
    > Help....
    > Connell
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Connell Gauld <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1
    > (itself) from PC-A. I cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A -
    > it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping both 192.168.0.1
    > and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.

    > Could it be a cable problem?

    Is the cable self-made? Otherwise it could be a routing problem.

    -- Robert
  4. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    >Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
    >cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping
    >both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.

    As Fred asked, make sure you aren't running a firewall on either PC.

    Also, not to impugn your cable making skills, but check your cables
    against one of the standards, and ensure you made them right.

    --
    William Smith
    ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
  5. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    If one of the PCs can ping the other PC and get a response then clearly
    ethernet packets are flowing in both directions.

    Sounds like its not a ethernet problem at all, but something to do with
    the TCP\IP setup.

    Stuart.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Robert Redelmeier" wrote:

    > Connell Gauld <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    > > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1
    > > (itself) from PC-A. I cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A -
    > > it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping both 192.168.0.1
    > > and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >
    > > Could it be a cable problem?
    >
    > Is the cable self-made? Otherwise it could be a routing problem.

    If PC-A responds to PC-B's pings, the cables must all be fine. And the
    switch betweem them as well.

    But your "routing problem" is what I would suspect. That is, it seems as
    if PC-B knows that PC-A is on its same IP subnet, and consequently pings
    it just fine. But possibly, when PC-A goes to ping PC-B, it (a) might
    not know that PC-B is on the same subnet, and (b) it does not have the
    address of a default router, nor can it listen for RIP or other router
    announcements to discover a router, because there are no routers in this
    simple net. So perhaps PC-A can't perhaps figure out how to reach PC-B.
    No router, different IP subnet. So in a sense, a "routing problem."

    Since the two PCs are only one LSbit different in the IP address, what
    might be the problem is that the PC-A IP subnet mask is set to all 255s.
    There aren't too many ways the mask can be set wrong, in this instance.

    Other than that, by responding to pings from PC-B, we know that PC-A is
    wired up just fine.

    Bert
  7. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Fred Marshall" <fmarshallx@remove_the_x.acm.org> wrote in message
    news:jPednV1_YdgDQ3zdRVn-ug@centurytel.net...
    > Firewall on either? Trusted zone defined to include those addresses?
    >
    > More than one interface on PC-A? Both with static addresses? Change the
    > unused one to Automatic address.....

    The only other network connection is a Dynamic IP dial-up connection.
    >
    > Not as likely cable or switch since the one ping does work entailing
    > communications in both directions.
    >

    When I do the "tracerc" command I get the same "Request Timeout" error. The
    wires are self made but I would have throught similarly (that it cannot be
    the cable as two-way communication is functional).

    Any further help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Connell
  8. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cbstab$8n3$1@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > "Fred Marshall" <fmarshallx@remove_the_x.acm.org> wrote in message
    > news:jPednV1_YdgDQ3zdRVn-ug@centurytel.net...
    > > Firewall on either? Trusted zone defined to include those addresses?
    > >
    > > More than one interface on PC-A? Both with static addresses? Change
    the
    > > unused one to Automatic address.....
    >
    > The only other network connection is a Dynamic IP dial-up connection.
    > >
    > > Not as likely cable or switch since the one ping does work entailing
    > > communications in both directions.
    > >
    >
    > When I do the "tracerc" command I get the same "Request Timeout" error.
    The
    > wires are self made but I would have throught similarly (that it cannot be
    > the cable as two-way communication is functional).
    >
    > Any further help would be appreciated.
    > Thanks
    > Connell

    Make sure the cables are wired to not split pairs. Use EIA/TIA 568B:

    http://duxcw.com/digest/Howto/network/cable/cable5.htm

    That will eliminate questions. Not that this is the only way to use the
    twisted pairs properly but it's the only good way to avoid confusion and
    wasted time thereafter.

    On the PC that cannot be pinged, run:
    >route print

    You should see something like this:
    Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

    >route print
    ===========================================================================
    Interface List
    0x1 ........................... MS TCP Loopback interface
    0x2 ...00 04 5a 4a b1 23 ...... Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet
    Adapter(LNE100TX
    v4) - Packet Scheduler Miniport
    ===========================================================================
    ===========================================================================
    Active Routes:
    Network Destination Netmask Gateway Interface Metric
    0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.9 20
    127.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 1
    192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.9 192.168.1.9 20
    192.168.1.9 255.255.255.255 127.0.0.1 127.0.0.1 20
    192.168.1.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.9 192.168.1.9 20
    224.0.0.0 240.0.0.0 192.168.1.9 192.168.1.9 20
    255.255.255.255 255.255.255.255 192.168.1.9 192.168.1.9 1
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1
    ===========================================================================
    Persistent Routes:
    None

    Note that the last line has the gateway and interface the same as the IP
    address of the network card I'm using.
    I believe you will find that if the line with 255.255.255.255 for
    Destination and Netmask doesn't have the IP address for gateway and possibly
    interface for the network interface of interest then you probably won't be
    able to ping that computer.
    Instead of trying to change the routing table itself, it's best to find out
    what combination of nework settings will cause it to become correct.....

    Fred
  9. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:

    > The only other network connection is a Dynamic IP dial-up connection.

    Hmmm. Which PC has that dialup? If it's PC-A, what if it is attempting
    to send pings to that IP dialup?

    If you connect a host to two different IP subnets, and the dialup and
    this separate private IP subnet would qualify as two IP subnets, then
    the host needs to know something about routing. It needs to know that
    anything destined to 192.168.0.x must NOT use the dialup connection.

    Bert
  10. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    <William P.N. Smith> wrote in message
    news:ne44e0p511cpoa9380b5bjokvtigklnra2@4ax.com...
    > "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    > >Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
    > >cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can
    ping
    > >both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >
    > As Fred asked, make sure you aren't running a firewall on either PC.

    No firewall on either PC.

    >
    > Also, not to impugn your cable making skills, but check your cables
    > against one of the standards, and ensure you made them right.

    I made them to the standard colour codings etc.

    >
    > --
    > William Smith
    > ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
  11. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 11:46:02 +0100, "Connell Gauld"
    <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:

    ><William P.N. Smith> wrote in message
    >news:ne44e0p511cpoa9380b5bjokvtigklnra2@4ax.com...
    >> "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    >> >Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
    >> >cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can
    >ping
    >> >both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >>
    >> As Fred asked, make sure you aren't running a firewall on either PC.
    >
    >No firewall on either PC.


    If you're running XP, make sure the built-in firewall is disabled by
    checking the advanced tab on the network connection properties.
  12. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Make sure both PCs have the same network name<>>>:.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Can you please post output of "IPCONFIG /ALL" for both PCs. This would be
    helpful in getting to the bottom of your issue.
    JZ
    "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:cbu592$jpi$1@news5.svr.pol.co.uk...
    > <William P.N. Smith> wrote in message
    > news:ne44e0p511cpoa9380b5bjokvtigklnra2@4ax.com...
    > > "Connell Gauld" <connell@freebreakfast.co.uk> wrote:
    > > >Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A.
    I
    > > >cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can
    > ping
    > > >both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    > >
    > > As Fred asked, make sure you aren't running a firewall on either PC.
    >
    > No firewall on either PC.
    >
    > >
    > > Also, not to impugn your cable making skills, but check your cables
    > > against one of the standards, and ensure you made them right.
    >
    > I made them to the standard colour codings etc.
    >
    > >
    > > --
    > > William Smith
    > > ComputerSmiths Consulting, Inc. www.compusmiths.com
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Connell Gauld wrote:

    > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A. I
    > cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can ping
    > both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.
    >
    > Can anyone help me with this problem? Could it be a cable problem? or the
    > switch? or my settings?

    Given that you can ping A from B, you can probably rule out hardware. I'd
    suspect a firewall blocking ping or ping response disabled.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Calvinbc wrote:

    > Make sure both PCs have the same network name<>>>:.

    Network name has absolutely nothing to do with ping.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Hi (who ??)

    > > Now for the actual problem. I can ping 192.168.0.1 (itself) from PC-A.

    This ping doesn't reach the Ethernet layer of your PC. It just means that
    your IP layer is running correctly, it's equivalent to ping 127.0.0.1.

    > > cannot ping 192.168.0.2 from PC-A - it gives "Request Timeout". I can
    ping
    > > both 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2 from PC-B.

    Give us more details, OS, network masks, and the contents of the arp tables
    after ping (command arp -a)

    Regards,
    Michelot
  17. Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

    Michelot wrote:

    > Hi (who ??)
    >

    I believe your comments should have been addressed to the OP, Connell Gauld,
    who was the one I was responding to. His name appears at the top my
    message, which you replied to.
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