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SCSI drive question

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  • Hard Drives
  • SCSI
  • Storage
  • Product
Last response: in Storage
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August 12, 2006 8:38:04 PM

I'm going to be building a gaming rig for myself for the first time. I did a search on SCSI on this forum first before posting but what was written unfortunately left me with even more questions.

I'm interested in the speed that SCSI drives provide (boot-up, load times, etc.) and I don't need much hard drive space so 30GB's is more than enough for me. I've been on sites like Newegg and was looking at the Hitachi Ultrastar SCSI drives for my build. I was also looking at using a ASUS A8N32 motherboard (or similar).

If I want to use a SCSI drive as my only drive in my computer, what other components of the computer does the drive have to be compatible with? Just the motherboard, right? What specification on the motherboard spec sheet should I be looking for to see if a drive is SCSI compatible?

I read in a few of the other threads of the "controller" component of the drive. Is that a built in portion of the drive or is this another component I have to buy in addition to the Ultrastar (or other brand of SCSI drive)?

Is building a system with a SCSI drive vs. a conventional drive more difficult for a first time builder? What would the difference be?

Thanks for your advice.

More about : scsi drive question

August 12, 2006 9:11:47 PM

I would say get a 36Gb Raptor for your OS and get another sata drive like 100Gb or so for backup and storage.
August 12, 2006 9:17:54 PM

That's exactly what I was thinking about doing, but I still haven't figured out the whole SCSI interface/installation thing yet. I've replaced hard drives in the past, but it seems that one just can't buy a SCSI drive, drop it in the computer, and let it do its thing.
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August 12, 2006 9:43:08 PM

the controller is a required part of the setup as it is what will communicate with the drives and the motherboard, it's just an add-in board (like graphics cards or sound cards) *some motherboards may have onboard scsi controllers, however, these boards are usually server boards, but i have seen them in enthusiast boards too*

i don't know too much about the specifics, but if you need to know more, you could try PMing wusy, he knows quite a bit on this stuff, and i'm sure others do too, but wait first to get replies.

Ara

*edited part*
August 12, 2006 9:47:51 PM

SCSI is usually reserved for servers and hi-end workstations,

to setup a SCSI device you need a controller card, or your mobo has to have an intergrated SCSI controller, None of the desktop boards support SCSI AFAIK. Only server boards support SCSI natively.

The Performance increase you see with SCSI is noticable but not really worth it for only gaming.

Its much more cost effective to get 10k raptors instead of 15k SCSI drives because usually SCSI cards cost over a few hundred.

Another problem with SCSI drives that make them unsuitable for gaming is that they are loud and they require active cooling, usually a fan blowing over them will do.

Do a google search on SCSI and wikipedia should have some good info on the subject too.

HTH
August 12, 2006 9:53:32 PM

Quote:
the controller is a required part of the setup as it is what will communicate with the drives and the motherboard, it's just an add-in board (like graphics cards or sound cards) *some motherboards may have onboard scsi controllers, however, these boards are usually server boards, but i have seen them in enthusiast boards too*

i don't know too much about the specifics, but if you need to know more, you could try PMing wusy, he knows quite a bit on this stuff, and i'm sure others do too, but wait first to get replies.

Ara

*edited part*


OK, now that makes much more sense. So basically if you want a SCSI drive, you have to find a motherboard that specifically states that it has an onboard SCSI hard drive controller, which will be difficult to find unless you're looking for a server motherboard since SCSI drives are typically found on servers. If the mobo doesn't have a built in SCSI controller, you have to purchase a SCSI controller card that would plug into a PCI slot, and then connect the SCSI drive to the PCI controller card.

Well, assuming one wanted to learn how to do the above, is there a step by step guide somewhere? Is installing a SCSI drive any harder than putting in a ATA type hard drive, for example?
August 12, 2006 9:56:45 PM

Quote:
SCSI is usually reserved for servers and hi-end workstations,

to setup a SCSI device you need a controller card, or your mobo has to have an intergrated SCSI controller, None of the desktop boards support SCSI AFAIK. Only server boards support SCSI natively.

The Performance increase you see with SCSI is noticable but not really worth it for only gaming.

Its much more cost effective to get 10k raptors instead of 15k SCSI drives because usually SCSI cards cost over a few hundred.

Another problem with SCSI drives that make them unsuitable for gaming is that they are loud and they require active cooling, usually a fan blowing over them will do.

Do a google search on SCSI and wikipedia should have some good info on the subject too.

HTH


OK, thanks Nitro. Just the fact that the controller card + a small SCSI drive would cost much more than a Raptor basically ends the whole SCSI topic for me! I guess it's a Raptor for me.
August 12, 2006 10:03:27 PM

Well since you want a gaming rig, then why not use raid 0 array with 2x36Gb Raptors. It's what I'm using and loads fast on both os and games. You don't really want to spend that much money for an SCSI drive and a card controller.

So can we see your list of the components are you buying. :) 
August 12, 2006 10:28:11 PM

Quote:
Well since you want a gaming rig, then why not use raid 0 array with 2x36Gb Raptors. It's what I'm using and loads fast on both os and games. You don't really want to spend that much money for an SCSI drive and a card controller.

So can we see your list of the components are you buying. :) 


Yes, I'd be happy to list my components. I was going to do that later to get everyone's opinion when the list was finalized, but this is a very preliminary list.....Feel fee to state your opinions......Looking to spend around $2000.

Radeon X1900XTX or GeForce 7800 GT
min 600W power supply of some sort (haven't figured this one out yet, open to suggestions- need 38A on 12V rail for the above I think)
AMD Athlon 64 FX-60 Toledo Socket 939
ASUS A8N32 (or similar ASUS mobo, haven't figured this one out yet)
WD 74GB Raptor (single drive, RAID too complicated for this newbie!)
Soundblaster XFI
2GB of quality RAM (open to suggestions)
case (ATX of some sort, haven't figured it out yet)
None of the above set in stone!
August 12, 2006 10:49:13 PM

Quote:

Radeon X1900XTX or GeForce 7800 GT


I hope you ment a Geforce 7900 GT. The 7800 GT is hotter, slower AND more expensive than the 7900 GT.
August 12, 2006 10:49:53 PM

Get the X1900XTX, BFG 650watts PSU, CORSAIR XMS 2GB (2 x 1GB).

For your case a Thermaltake Armor would give it plenty of room.

Can I ask a question why you are not going for Conroe?
August 12, 2006 10:51:47 PM

Quote:
I would say get a 36Gb Raptor for your OS and get another sata drive like 100Gb or so for backup and storage.

36GB Raptor are slow compared to 74GB/150GB. They were experiment residues for the 74GB Raptor.
Heck, even a 160GB/platter Seagate 7200.10 will beat it.

Really! Well I didn't know that. I have the 74Gb raptor raid 0 and i thought the difference would be only the price. :oops: 

What array are you using Wusy? :) 
August 13, 2006 1:03:43 AM

Quote:
Get the X1900XTX, BFG 650watts PSU, CORSAIR XMS 2GB (2 x 1GB).

For your case a Thermaltake Armor would give it plenty of room.

Can I ask a question why you are not going for Conroe?


Looks like Conroe is much more expensive than Toledo or Windsor.

Is the the 650 WATT BFG you're talking about? I have a gift card to burn up at CompUSA so if that's the one you're referring to, I'll probably take a good look at it........

http://www.compusa.com/products/product_info.asp?pfp=ca...

Do you guys see any good cases in the CompUSA site? Those are the Thermaltakes you're talking about? I'll have a little left over if I buy that power supply.........
August 14, 2006 1:47:40 AM

Yeah it's a good power supply for high performance and heavy moded rig. It comes with a lifetime warranty so I have no worries if this thing ever burn up. It's the best PSU I currently own.
August 14, 2006 2:23:17 AM

SCSI is a (or at least was) a big hassle you will need a good controller I'm guessing a couple hundred for one. A motherboard with a bios that will boot a
scsi drive and is compatible with it. My SCSI drives that i owned seemed short lived but Fast.
!