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Upgrading a Celeron-M laptop

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August 14, 2006 12:03:29 AM

Hi,

I have a Compaq V2403 laptop its got a 1.4 Ghz Celeron-M inside (pretty sure its the Dothan core 360J). Its a 400Mhz bus with 1MB cache.

I'm trying to figure out what upgrade options i have.

I'd like to upgrade to a pentium-m mainly for the improved battery life via Speedstep. I was hoping to get a 1.7 Ghz or better, but i am aware of the dangers of putting a higher clock CPU into a cooling system that was designed for a 1.4 Ghz.

I was also concerned with what restrictions if any the bios will add to the picture. For instance, is Speedstep a bios-managed function, or does the CPU handle it autonomously? And will a Pentium-M CPU with 533 Mhz bus work in a 400 Mhz motherboard?

Has anyone had luck upgrading Celeron-m laptops?

If its helpful, i have a photo of the CPU, and the motherboard Socket (479) here:

August 14, 2006 3:01:17 AM

Before upgrading to a Pentium M, you need to make sure that the BIOS will support it. If the laptop range that yours is part of also contains Pentium M models then you should be in luck. It’s worth looking for a BIOS update for your laptop as that might give support for a wider range of CPUs.
For Speedstep to be useable the motherboard chipset and the BIOS need to support it.

I wouldn’t worry about the extra heat in jumping to a faster CPU in the scenario that you mentioned. Laptops will be designed to support a range of CPU speeds and will typically use the same cooling system for the range. You may end up with higher fan speeds with a faster processor though.
I suggest that you under-volt your Pentium M if you get one by using CrystalCPUID. This freeware utility allows you to set custom multiplier and VCore values. My T2300 is set to use only 1.15V at full speed for example. This will dramatically reduce the CPU power consumption and reduce heat output and improve battery life. It will only work with CPUs that support Speedstep or AMDs equivalent (Cool ‘n’ Quiet) and works with laptops and desktop chips. It’s highly recommended.
August 14, 2006 6:26:46 AM

Quote:
Before upgrading to a Pentium M, you need to make sure that the BIOS will support it. If the laptop range that yours is part of also contains Pentium M models then you should be in luck. It’s worth looking for a BIOS update for your laptop as that might give support for a wider range of CPUs.
For Speedstep to be useable the motherboard chipset and the BIOS need to support it.

I wouldn’t worry about the extra heat in jumping to a faster CPU in the scenario that you mentioned. Laptops will be designed to support a range of CPU speeds and will typically use the same cooling system for the range. You may end up with higher fan speeds with a faster processor though.
I suggest that you under-volt your Pentium M if you get one by using CrystalCPUID. This freeware utility allows you to set custom multiplier and VCore values. My T2300 is set to use only 1.15V at full speed for example. This will dramatically reduce the CPU power consumption and reduce heat output and improve battery life. It will only work with CPUs that support Speedstep or AMDs equivalent (Cool ‘n’ Quiet) and works with laptops and desktop chips. It’s highly recommended.


thanks for the response. i'll look into the bios support, though i am currently running the most recent bios provided by HPaq. Has anyone had luck downloading the OEM bios for their laptop motherboard, rather than the vendor's gimped "Consumer" bios?

and thanks for the CrystalCPUID recommendation, but i mostly run Ubuntu Linux on my laptop. I only use Windows for World of Warcraft, which is rapidly improving under Wine.
!