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the best liquid cooling system so far!

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August 14, 2006 6:44:43 AM

Hi guys, Im planning on building a rig with an athlon X2 3800+ socket AM2 and ive been looking at good complete liquid cooling systems to overclock it. The best one ive found so far is this Kingwin AS-3000.
It can be placed in two 5.25" bays or external, it comes with everything you need and even a VGA cooling block! plus, it has great reviews on Newegg.

Can you think of any other better complete water cooling thats in around the same price range?? if you can, do share =]

More about : liquid cooling system

August 14, 2006 7:16:39 AM

Quote:
Hi guys, Im planning on building a rig with an athlon X2 3800+ socket AM2 and ive been looking at good complete liquid cooling systems to overclock it. The best one ive found so far is this Kingwin AS-3000.
It can be placed in two 5.25" bays or external, it comes with everything you need and even a VGA cooling block! plus, it has great reviews on Newegg.

Can you think of any other better complete water cooling thats in around the same price range?? if you can, do share =]


My advice is that unless you want to overclock your X2 to 3ghz, there's no point to water cooling.

Unleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeesssss you want it for the bragging rights. In that case, go for it!!!
August 14, 2006 7:46:34 AM

I have the same water cooling system, 2 of them actually, one for the cpu and north bridge and the other for 7800GTX SLi. It's okay for it's price and with an extra 120mm radiator for the cpu and n/b loop I'm getting 33c idle and 40c full load, keep in mind that I included the north bridge. Why? because the little fan that cools the n/b is noisy, in fact it was the most noticeable noise. So now my pc is very quite. And for the second kit for 7800GTX SLi, I get 45c idle and 55c full load. So total I spent about $250 buck for 2 separate kits and I'm satisfied with it. Although this is my first water cooling and started with an entry-level kit. Next time I'm getting something better like those $400-$500 cooling kit.
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August 14, 2006 8:27:47 AM

Awesome, im planning on using the second block on my 7900GT because im going for a fanless Asus Crosshair motherboard so theres no noise there. You seem to know the system pretty well and the only thing I was worried about was if the cpu block would fit with those big heatsinks in there, could you take a peek at the pics and tell me what you think?? thanks
August 14, 2006 8:43:48 AM

It's should be fine and won't snag on the heatpipe. Nice motherboard anyway.

Mine:


With the n/b included:

August 14, 2006 9:37:33 AM

Hi,

I have the Coolermaster version of this cooling system, my rig is based on an OC'd D805. I have bought an additional rad to improve cooling.

I find it a tad noisy but effective. I would buy this equipment again, I consider it valuable.

Hope that helps
August 14, 2006 5:18:18 PM

That's a pretty good system for the price and unless you want to move up to the bigwater 745 then it's probably the best, or at least comparable, in that price range.

Technically I wouldn't call it the "best" but it is a good value for what you are paying.
August 15, 2006 12:17:16 AM

Quote:
It's should be fine and won't snag on the heatpipe. Nice motherboard anyway.


radd, yours looks really cool. I read some reviews about the coolant not being enough or being low quality, how true is this?? also, I guess not but, is that the same coolant that came with the system??

What processor are you using? and how much have you been able to overclock it to?? what about your graphics card?? was it hard to remove the fan and heatsink from the cards?? thanks again. lol it seems like I did have a few more questions =P
August 15, 2006 12:22:59 AM

Quote:
Hi,

I have the Coolermaster version of this cooling system, my rig is based on an OC'd D805. I have bought an additional rad to improve cooling.

I find it a tad noisy but effective. I would buy this equipment again, I consider it valuable.

Hope that helps


I considered that system for a long time too, but since it didnt come with the VGA block (I know I could make the loop on my own but its easier if its comes included lol) and it couldnt be external (not that im using it like that but it may come in handy) I rathered this one, also that once seems a bit spacious.
Ive heard the D805 is great for overclocking you must having a good time turning it all the way up lol
August 15, 2006 2:41:18 AM

yes technically is isnt the best but its the best you can get for under $100 =]. The bigwater series are really cool more than one with two radiators, but honestly I think thats too much for me right now, if I want to cool down some SLI'd cards and a chipset I might as well just add another radiator and cooling blocks, or get a whole other system and merge them =]
August 15, 2006 6:25:33 AM

Just be careful with adding additional components to that system. I don't think that the pump is really that great and by adding more components you are making it work harder. the tubing is also smaller diameter than a DIY, so the water flow is already restricted.
August 15, 2006 6:35:55 AM

Quote:
It's should be fine and won't snag on the heatpipe. Nice motherboard anyway.


radd, yours looks really cool. I read some reviews about the coolant not being enough or being low quality, how true is this?? also, I guess not but, is that the same coolant that came with the system??

What processor are you using? and how much have you been able to overclock it to?? what about your graphics card?? was it hard to remove the fan and heatsink from the cards?? thanks again. lol it seems like I did have a few more questions =P

For the fluid I use Fluid XP+, it's a none-electrical conductive fluid and has close thermal properties of water. It's pretty cool actually, at first I was sceptical about it and so I tried it on my old pc and pour some on the graphics card and it works it didn't fried the graphics card! So it's the only fluid I'm using for my water cooling rig.

As for my processor I have Pentium D 840 overclocked to 3.840Ghz (20%). I have managed to oc it to 4Ghz but now that I have included the n/b on the cpu loop it gets hot. Goes up to 60c @ 4Ghz, but I stopped it anyways cuz I have Vcore up to a toasty 1.45v! So now it's at 3.840Ghz with 1.35Vcore. Temps is 33c idle and 42c full load on BF2 at 28-30c room temp. The AS-3000 water block is very easy to install with the thumb screws. That's it.

My graphics cards is 2x7800GTX OC from BFG overclocked to 500/1400. Temps at 42c idle and 55c full load. Well the stock cooler is easy to remove just by unscrewing I think 5 screws in the bottom. I lelf the copper heatsink for the rams and just removed the heatsink/fan for the GPU itself. As for the water block installed is fairly easy as well and just screw in 4 screws and it's done. And by the way I'm using Artic Silver 5 for my thermal pastes.

Cpu water block installation:

Place the backplate to the motherboard.


Apply thin layer of thermal paste on cpu, place the cpu water block on top, place the mounting plate and finally screw in the four thumbscrews nice and tight.

Gpu water block installation:

Remove gpu stock cooler and leave the ram heatsink. Clean gpu and apply thin coat of thermal paste.


Place the backplate, put the gpu water block, place mount bracket and screw in four screws.


And there. Cpu, n/b, and two graphics card are water cooled.



And the final product.

Check this out too.
http://www.slizone.com/object/slizone_rotm_june06.html

Good luck with yours. :D 
August 15, 2006 6:48:37 AM

thanks for all that info! and kudos on the rig of the month award! now yeah I know every thign I wanted to know about the system thanks! =]
August 15, 2006 6:51:12 AM

Just be extra careful when installing it and then run it and monitor the temps really close after build. :) 
August 15, 2006 6:56:15 AM

will do dont worry, ill try it outside the case for a few hours first. ill get a different coolant and possibly a thermal paste too.
August 15, 2006 7:02:05 AM

Are you going to use water or a none-electrical conductive fluid? Although I my water cooling system has not experience a leak and I have a small chance that it will, but still I use Fluid XP+ just to be on the safe side. Well let me know how it goes.
August 15, 2006 7:04:41 AM

Definetly a non conductive coolant. Thats why im not using the one that comes in the box, because im not sure if its non-eletrical conductive (besides... its orange... lol)
August 15, 2006 7:08:39 AM

Where are you buying your parts anyways. I got the cooling fluid at Frozencpu.
August 15, 2006 7:14:02 AM

newegg, but ill check that site out. Hows this coolant for you? i dont think its non-conductive. hey what about DISTILLED** water? ive heard some ppl use that
August 15, 2006 7:25:19 AM

No, I don't think it's non-conductive either. I'm sure it's good but not as safe as non-conductive. Yeah, some people use distilled water to fill their water cooling system since distilled water has less impurities like minerals and so it doesn't deteriorate/rust the system. But you have to add a solution like anti-freeze with 1:15 solution to water ratio so that molds and bacteria don't grow in the water.
August 15, 2006 7:32:26 AM

ooh, so for example I could use the distilled water and a 15th of the solution that comes with the box? This is the solution that comes with it, it syas that its anti-freeze but in not sure if its that kind. Also I guess distilled water isnt non-conductive right?
August 15, 2006 7:50:43 AM

Yeah that's it you need to mix all that and no, distilled water still conducts electricity.

So do you know how to fill up the system with liquid and without running the pc but just running the cooling system? If not then here's something for you.

After installing the water cooling system, you need to fill it with the cooling fluid/water. And so you need to do it with the pc off.

So remove all power connection from the PSU like the mobo, media, graphics card, hd and etc. Then just connect the cooling system.

So now the only thing that is connected to the PSU is the cooling system.

Now unplug the power cable for the PSU to the wall. Then get a paper clip or a wire you can use to connect.

Now the psu is uplug from the wall and switch off.

Now take the mobo power supply and locate the green wire. There's should only be one and then locate a black and there are many black wires and either one would work.

Using the paper clip or wire connect the green and any black wire together. Make sure it's secure in there and place it somewhere it's not going to be knock out.

Plug the psu back to the wall and hit the psu switch. It's should run and along with the cooling system.

Now fill the reservoir with distilled water/cooling fluid and it's going to circulate making sure all air on the tube and cooling blocks are gone and have someone if you can check for leaks at the same time. If there's a leak then shut the power down and fix the problem.

If not.........

So you need to shake the system a bit and the pc to get rid of some bubbles trapped in the tubes and blocks. Fill with water or cooling fluid close to a full.

Now let it run for a day and constantly check for leaks. Do this as soon as you fill the water/fluid.

After a day of running and without leaks then you can add that water cooling solution. If you're using a cooling fluid then don't add it.

And now you can reconnect all power cables and finally run your system water cooled.
August 15, 2006 8:04:55 AM

hey thanks for that, I knew that I couldnt simply plug in the cooling system because it needs to go trhu the motherboard but I wasnt quite sure how.
I think ill get this coolant and some water dye hehe for a nice all blue effect =]
August 15, 2006 9:27:56 AM

yeah that's a good one and good luck again for your installation.
August 18, 2006 6:52:05 PM

Hi, I'm thinking of getting a Water Cooling system as well, to start meddling with water and electricity (MWAHAHA). Jokes aside, I'd like the opinion on some nice system to start.

I was also navigating through Thermaltake site and found out this case:

Kandalf with LCS

I found it priced at U$ 250.

Do you think it's worth the price?

Also, is there any Liquid I could use instead of water for a better result? (I Know people use Liquid Nitrogen, but I think I couldn't afford and properly stock it at home)


PS - My objectives are to do some nice oc and really lower my dB (my computer sounds like an aircraft - mostly thanks to the fan on the radeon).
Thanks.
August 18, 2006 7:51:53 PM

Another question,

I read the KINGWIN Aquastar AS-3000 specs at the link posted above, and I got the impression it doesn't come with a reservoir. Is it true?

Thanks.
August 18, 2006 9:53:11 PM

The way is see thats a really good liquid cooling system! awesome radiator, very good pump and its build in.
ild say its about $100 the case and $150 the cooling system wich sounds good to me for what it is.
There are tons of coolants you can use, in fact DONT use water or liquid nitrogen, youre not freezinf hell, just cooling down a comp.

go to frozencpu.com they have a large selection of non-eletrical conductive coolants.

And the AS-3000 comes with everyhting you need you dont need to buy anything extra.
August 19, 2006 6:16:29 AM

Yes it very worth the price. The case alone is a good deal and now they have the LCS version, that is a lot cooler. I would buy that case for just the radiator alone. It's a very nice layout for the rad, very clean. The air would blow inward I think but if not the just rotate the fans to blow air outward. It's better that way so that the hot air do not circulate inside the case. Check out my pc and as well you can see that my rads are sticking out like a sore thumb. hehe. Anyways the cooling that comes with it is good, not great but it does the job done. My low-end kit even works with my overclocked hot 840 and N/B, so I don't doubt that the LCS can do it's job better. I bought my case (Kandalf) for like $200 last year and I only have like 2x120mm and 2 90mm for cooling. So for 250 bucks yeah, I'd say it's a great deal. If you buy it let me know how it performs.
August 21, 2006 2:40:27 PM

Quote:
Yes it very worth the price. The case alone is a good deal and now they have the LCS version, that is a lot cooler. I would buy that case for just the radiator alone. It's a very nice layout for the rad, very clean. The air would blow inward I think but if not the just rotate the fans to blow air outward. It's better that way so that the hot air do not circulate inside the case. Check out my pc and as well you can see that my rads are sticking out like a sore thumb. hehe. Anyways the cooling that comes with it is good, not great but it does the job done. My low-end kit even works with my overclocked hot 840 and N/B, so I don't doubt that the LCS can do it's job better. I bought my case (Kandalf) for like $200 last year and I only have like 2x120mm and 2 90mm for cooling. So for 250 bucks yeah, I'd say it's a great deal. If you buy it let me know how it performs.


Sure. =)
August 22, 2006 2:01:43 PM

Hmmm,

Why not build your own inline system? Choose parts, put it all together and enjoy better performance and a custom system that meets your needs, budget and the size of your case.

http://www.performance-pcs.com has quite a few brands and MANY MANY different parts.
August 22, 2006 4:57:50 PM

Quote:
Hmmm,

Why not build your own inline system? Choose parts, put it all together and enjoy better performance and a custom system that meets your needs, budget and the size of your case.

http://www.performance-pcs.com has quite a few brands and MANY MANY different parts.


The thing is that I don't know much about the brands of watercooler parts, and as I saw the KINGWIN Aquastar AS-3000 looked interesting for a first time builder, I started searching at some brands for nice solutions, without getting too much into detail, so I came by this case, which at first look is interesting and as I searched the internet, it's price seemed as interesting, compared to the pricing for the case and the pricing for similar watercooling systems and it also seems easier to transport from the US to Brazil and easier to get replacement parts around here as Thermaltake has local representatives here. But if you can give me any indication on parts and brands, I'd take a look (I'm going to be in the US in about 2 weeks, and I'm hoping I can get the most stuff in my $ 500 budget - I have a a64 x2 3800+ in mind too).
August 22, 2006 6:04:12 PM

Boxed water cooling setups, especially at that price, are usually crap. They generally cool less effectively than a quality HSF combination that will cost you about half as much. If you plan to use water cooling you should visit www.dangerden.com. You will spend more than $100, but you definately get what you pay for. My rig (A64 3500+) is room temperature (25 C) at idle and 5-10 degrees hotter under load.

Water cools better than any other liquid at room temperature, so I use distilled water mixed with Zerex super coolant to prevent corrosion. Non conductive liquid will run a few degrees hotter, but you insure yourself against a possible catastrophe if a leak were to occur.

Unless you are going to spend what it takes to get a decent water cooling system, you would be better just buying a Thermalright heatsink and putting a 120mm Vantec Stealth fan on it. You'll get the same cooling performance and the noise level will be about the same. Plus you'll spend half as much money.

If you go the Dangerden route, get a TDX waterblock, DDC-12V pump, a nice radiator, a reservior, and some tubing. That will run you about $200, but you won't be able to top the performance without getting into peltier or phase change cooling.
August 22, 2006 7:32:33 PM

Quote:
Boxed water cooling setups, especially at that price, are usually crap. They generally cool less effectively than a quality HSF combination that will cost you about half as much. If you plan to use water cooling you should visit www.dangerden.com. You will spend more than $100, but you definately get what you pay for. My rig (A64 3500+) is room temperature (25 C) at idle and 5-10 degrees hotter under load.

Water cools better than any other liquid at room temperature, so I use distilled water mixed with Zerex super coolant to prevent corrosion. Non conductive liquid will run a few degrees hotter, but you insure yourself against a possible catastrophe if a leak were to occur.

Unless you are going to spend what it takes to get a decent water cooling system, you would be better just buying a Thermalright heatsink and putting a 120mm Vantec Stealth fan on it. You'll get the same cooling performance and the noise level will be about the same. Plus you'll spend half as much money.

If you go the Dangerden route, get a TDX waterblock, DDC-12V pump, a nice radiator, a reservior, and some tubing. That will run you about $200, but you won't be able to top the performance without getting into peltier or phase change cooling.


Thanks. I'll take a look at them.
My cpu now works at 29/33 (which is usually below room temperature around here) idle/load with my Zalman 7000B-Cu (without oc, with oc of 18% the temperature rise to about 35/41).
August 22, 2006 10:21:20 PM

Quote:
My cpu now works at 29/33 (which is usually below room temperature around here) idle/load with my Zalman 7000B-Cu (without oc, with oc of 18% the temperature rise to about 35/41).


I just have to point out that as your cpu is a source of heat, there is no physical way it can be cooler than ambient. Your cpu's hsf uses the air inside the case (usually higher than ambient) to cool the cpu. So it's using warmer air than the ambient air temperature of your room to cool something that generates heat....

Good water cooling will probably cost at least $200 USD. Don't get the kingwin set unless you are just trying to reduce the noise not increase performance.

I use a mixture of swiftech and danger den.
August 23, 2006 1:24:16 AM

Quote:
My cpu now works at 29/33 (which is usually below room temperature around here) idle/load with my Zalman 7000B-Cu (without oc, with oc of 18% the temperature rise to about 35/41).


I just have to point out that as your cpu is a source of heat, there is no physical way it can be cooler than ambient. Your cpu's hsf uses the air inside the case (usually higher than ambient) to cool the cpu. So it's using warmer air than the ambient air temperature of your room to cool something that generates heat....

Good water cooling will probably cost at least $200 USD. Don't get the kingwin set unless you are just trying to reduce the noise not increase performance.

I use a mixture of swiftech and danger den.

It was strange at first, but as here in Rio de Janeiro, temperatures lower than 30oC are really rare. And I do have a few extra-coolers at my case (one in the front, one in the back and one on the side).

I was thinking of getting the case I posted above:

Quote:
I was also navigating through Thermaltake site and found out this case:

Kandalf with LCS

I found it priced at U$ 250.


What do you think about it?
August 24, 2006 6:23:20 PM

The case with included water cooling is fine but the only thing I really like about it is the premodded case with the installed radiator. The block, pump and hose are not what I'd choose.

I'll give you some comparisons.

Swiftech MCP655 (pump) = 1200 lph (only one moving part and tested for 50,000 hours as well as variable speed and so quiet you have to really really try to hear it.)
Thermaltake pump = 500 lph (apparently "superb" and can "easily" handle gpu, hdd and chipset) no other technical specs... I wonder why?

1/2" ID x 3/4" OD (full 1/4" thick prevents kinking) diameter tubing
3/8" ID x ??

the reservoir is at the same level as the pump. I prefer to have mine higher than the pump and mine is vertical to help prevent bubbles in the system.

The black tubing coming off the component to attach to the clear tubing looks messy.

Don't get me wrong, this is a pretty good deal for an entry level system pre installed in a very good case. Just not my cup of tea.
August 24, 2006 7:49:20 PM

Quote:
The case with included water cooling is fine but the only thing I really like about it is the premodded case with the installed radiator. The block, pump and hose are not what I'd choose.

I'll give you some comparisons.

Swiftech MCP655 (pump) = 1200 lph (only one moving part and tested for 50,000 hours as well as variable speed and so quiet you have to really really try to hear it.)
Thermaltake pump = 500 lph (apparently "superb" and can "easily" handle gpu, hdd and chipset) no other technical specs... I wonder why?

1/2" ID x 3/4" OD (full 1/4" thick prevents kinking) diameter tubing
3/8" ID x ??

the reservoir is at the same level as the pump. I prefer to have mine higher than the pump and mine is vertical to help prevent bubbles in the system.

The black tubing coming off the component to attach to the clear tubing looks messy.

Don't get me wrong, this is a pretty good deal for an entry level system pre installed in a very good case. Just not my cup of tea.


I understand your point. And I was thinking of getting it more for the case and radiator themselves, cause I know I could upgrade the cooling system later. And thanks for the advice on the pump.
August 27, 2006 6:09:07 PM

NOOOOO this is what happens when i take a vacation =[


do NOT buy the coolermaster watercooling kit, i guarantee you that a high end air coolign solution will run circles around it.

when you think about gettign watercooling, don't even consider kits unless its the custom dangerden or swiftech kits.

do some research on xtremesystems.org and you'll see why you NEVER buy those coolermaster or bigwater kits
August 27, 2006 9:17:20 PM

Quote:
"]NOOOOO this is what happens when i take a vacation =[


do NOT buy the coolermaster watercooling kit, i guarantee you that a high end air coolign solution will run circles around it.

when you think about gettign watercooling, don't even consider kits unless its the custom dangerden or swiftech kits.

do some research on xtremesystems.org and you'll see why you NEVER buy those coolermaster or bigwater kits


Ok. I'll take a look there. But what about the case and radiator? Are they worth?
August 27, 2006 9:23:38 PM

Quote:
For some strange arrogant reason they don't seem to read your guide even if I told them to. I give up.


If you're talking about the Introduction to Watercooling thread, I read it. But I wanted to know about the case from thermaltake.
August 27, 2006 9:34:48 PM

no, spend your money on a high quality case like a lian li v2000, coolermaster stacker or if you have the money a mountainmod ufo cube

and in terms of radiators, go for the PA series for the best performance versus noise ratio
August 27, 2006 10:31:43 PM

I myself got the titan nikita watercooler, and xbit revieved it very high against competitors which cost twice as much, and it also comes with a gpu waterblock... I thik its a good buy and i am most happy with it. i never go over 45 degrees even when my voltage is set to 1.65v on my AMD 3000+ clawhammer (to get it to 2.6ghz). I dont know about the kingwon system, but the Nikita runs a little loud, but all in all its an extremely reliable unit and runs beautifully. I never cared bout uv reactivity sonce my case is closed (no window), and i use a conductive fluid (destilled water + antifreeze) to cool it. If ur worried bout it ruining ur system then you put it together, plug it into the PSU (and only it) and check for leeks, then you just install it.
August 28, 2006 12:39:49 PM

Quote:
"]no, spend your money on a high quality case like a lian li v2000, coolermaster stacker or if you have the money a mountainmod ufo cube

and in terms of radiators, go for the PA series for the best performance versus noise ratio


Thanks.
!