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How long does DNS name server take to propagate to the Int..

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  • Microsoft
  • DNS
  • Servers
  • Windows
Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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Anonymous
September 16, 2004 5:07:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns,microsoft.public.windows.server.dns (More info?)

Hi,

I've got a basic question for you: I was hosting my external DNS using
Windows 2000, but yesterday I moved all of my DNS zones to a 3rd party DNS
provider called UltraDNS. I then logged on to my registrar's website and
pointed the name servers for my domain to:

udns1.ultradns.net
udns2.ultradns.net

I also *deleted* references to the previous nameservers. Some Internet
users are now able to resolve hostnames in my domain, while others are not.
Can you tell me how long it takes for this type of change to propagate out
through the Internet? Are we talking days, weeks, or..?

Thanks,

Sal Bompensaro

More about : long dns server propagate int

Anonymous
September 16, 2004 5:18:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns,microsoft.public.windows.server.dns (More info?)

It depends on when the last updates occured, when you actually made the
changes and whether or not the old record had been seen by someone.
Typically a 24-hour lag is what you should expect for new records. Old
records that have been modified may not be noticed until the original TTL
expires on a client that has previously requested and cached those records.
Some ISP say 72-hours is their norm

--
Sincerely,

Dèjì Akómöláfé, MCSE MCSA MCP+I
Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
www.readymaids.com - we know IT
www.akomolafe.com
Do you now realize that Today is the Tomorrow you were worried about
Yesterday? -anon
"Chien Lau" <MontherInLau@grandson.pop> wrote in message
news:uYXiDjCnEHA.2140@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> I've got a basic question for you: I was hosting my external DNS using
> Windows 2000, but yesterday I moved all of my DNS zones to a 3rd party DNS
> provider called UltraDNS. I then logged on to my registrar's website and
> pointed the name servers for my domain to:
>
> udns1.ultradns.net
> udns2.ultradns.net
>
> I also *deleted* references to the previous nameservers. Some Internet
> users are now able to resolve hostnames in my domain, while others are
not.
> Can you tell me how long it takes for this type of change to propagate out
> through the Internet? Are we talking days, weeks, or..?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sal Bompensaro
>
>
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 6:39:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns,microsoft.public.windows.server.dns (More info?)

"Deji Akomolafe" <noemail@akomolafe.com> wrote in message
news:o 8dbEpCnEHA.2764@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> It depends on when the last updates occured, when you actually made the
> changes and whether or not the old record had been seen by someone.
> Typically a 24-hour lag is what you should expect for new records. Old
> records that have been modified may not be noticed until the original TTL
> expires on a client that has previously requested and cached those
records.
> Some ISP say 72-hours is their norm
>

...but the thing is, no records have been changed. They are all the
same. Only the nameservers have changed. Do ISPs cache nameservers as well
as records? In other words, if an AOL customer wants to reach
www.MyDomain.com and the record is not cached, will AOL's DNS server attempt
to contact my **NEW** DNS server at UltraDNS or will it try to contact my
old one instead?

I hope this makes sense...

Thanks, Deji.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 7:25:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns,microsoft.public.windows.server.dns (More info?)

It's the same. The registrar/ISP publishes the NS records for your Domain.
(Normally) If someone had queried for you domain 1 hour ago, they will cache
the info for your NS for as long as your TTL indicates. If you then change
your NS records at your Registrar, your Registrar will then send the
information to the Registry (being brief here). When the update occurs, the
guy that looked you up 1 hour before you made the changes will not know
about that change until the TTL expires and the information is needed again.
This is the reason why you need to bring down the TTL on your records well
before you make changes.

Just wait it out is all I can say.

--
Sincerely,

Dèjì Akómöláfé, MCSE MCSA MCP+I
Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
www.readymaids.com - we know IT
www.akomolafe.com
Do you now realize that Today is the Tomorrow you were worried about
Yesterday? -anon
"Chien Lau" <MontherInLau@grandson.pop> wrote in message
news:utzNaWDnEHA.1992@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>
> "Deji Akomolafe" <noemail@akomolafe.com> wrote in message
> news:o 8dbEpCnEHA.2764@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > It depends on when the last updates occured, when you actually made the
> > changes and whether or not the old record had been seen by someone.
> > Typically a 24-hour lag is what you should expect for new records. Old
> > records that have been modified may not be noticed until the original
TTL
> > expires on a client that has previously requested and cached those
> records.
> > Some ISP say 72-hours is their norm
> >
>
> ...but the thing is, no records have been changed. They are all the
> same. Only the nameservers have changed. Do ISPs cache nameservers as
well
> as records? In other words, if an AOL customer wants to reach
> www.MyDomain.com and the record is not cached, will AOL's DNS server
attempt
> to contact my **NEW** DNS server at UltraDNS or will it try to contact my
> old one instead?
>
> I hope this makes sense...
>
> Thanks, Deji.
>
>
>
Anonymous
September 16, 2004 10:41:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns,microsoft.public.windows.server.dns (More info?)

I have a different take on what you have done . .

If the previous dns servers authoritivative for your domaina are still up
with the correct records, and the new dns servers are holding the same
records, the 12 -24 transition should be seemless to end users. There should
be no interuption of servcie for anyone.

I have change authoritative DNS servers several times with no interuption
during the propagation.



"Chien Lau" <MontherInLau@grandson.pop> wrote in message
news:uYXiDjCnEHA.2140@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> I've got a basic question for you: I was hosting my external DNS using
> Windows 2000, but yesterday I moved all of my DNS zones to a 3rd party DNS
> provider called UltraDNS. I then logged on to my registrar's website and
> pointed the name servers for my domain to:
>
> udns1.ultradns.net
> udns2.ultradns.net
>
> I also *deleted* references to the previous nameservers. Some Internet
> users are now able to resolve hostnames in my domain, while others are
> not.
> Can you tell me how long it takes for this type of change to propagate out
> through the Internet? Are we talking days, weeks, or..?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sal Bompensaro
>
>
!