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Antec SmartPower 500W & 7950GX2

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August 16, 2006 3:54:18 AM

I am about to build the following:

E6600
Intel 975XBX
2GB RAM
74GB Raptor
MSI 7950GX2
Antec SmartPower 2.0 500W

I have found the following on the Nvidia website:

Quote:
Q: What is the recommended power supply for GeForce 7950 GX2?
A: The minimum recommended power supply for a single GeForce 7950 GX2 is 400W (with 12V current rating of 27A).


Does this mean that the 7950GX2 needs 27A all to itself?

According to information found on the Antec PSU box, +12V Rail 1 can handle 17A and +12V Rail 2 can handle 19A. Rail 1 is supposed to supply the motherboard and peripherals, rail 2 is for the processor 'for greater system stability', according to Antec.

Do I need a better power supply?

More about : antec smartpower 500w 7950gx2

August 16, 2006 5:16:32 AM

I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp
August 16, 2006 1:06:58 PM

Quote:
I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp


Absolute rubbish. 400W is the reccomended PSU for using this graphics card in your typical PC. A 10,000 RPM drive doesn't use much power at all...... so it's not something that you really need to consider in the big scheme of things.

If you get a decent brand with some strong rails and the right amount of power on the right rails you don't need a 750 watt PSU. A 500W PSU will probably do as long as it can punch out enough power for the graphics card. Maybe a 550W or 600W to be on the extremely safe side but all a 750W PSU is going to do is use more power in the long run.

I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.

Put his configuration into that PSU calculator and tell me what the reccomended wattage is for his system.......
August 16, 2006 1:28:17 PM

To answer your question, your PSU is fine to handle that GPU. The required 27amps guideline that Nvidia gave was for OVERALL/COMBINED amperage on ALL rails - a minimum of 27 COMBINED amps is more accurate to say.

As for those PSU calculators.....They can be a good guideline in the event that you are needing some kind of estimate for wattage consumption but they aren't accurate by any means.

Since you have a combined 36amps on your 12v rails you have some breathing room but remember this - those rails feed the motherboard, cpu, peripherals, PCIe slot (GPU), etc so be mindful about overclocking.
August 17, 2006 12:24:41 AM

360maxi, I can see what you are talking about. Don't forget that the graphics card you used was a 6600GT, which consumes a lot less than a 7950GX2. Also realize that it may run on 350 Watts, but with an upgrade it can run faster. (it can run at its max potential, when the power supply is no ALREADY under heavy load due to other components) As I have said, I upgraded to a better power supply, and that ALONE gave me a boost in performance. A 10,000 RPM drive uses more than a standard 7,200.

Phreejak, please note that 18A each, on dual 12 rails, does not mean that it supplies 36 amps. You need to look at the PSU chart for the maximum combined wattage for all 12v rails combined. Just keep that in mind, and do not let it fool you :) 
August 17, 2006 12:29:42 AM

Quote:
360maxi, I can see what you are talking about. Don't forget that the graphics card you used was a 6600GT, which consumes a lot less than a 7950GX2. Also realize that it may run on 350 Watts, but with an upgrade it can run faster. (it can run at its max potential, when the power supply is no ALREADY under heavy load due to other components) As I have said, I upgraded to a better power supply, and that ALONE gave me a boost in performance. A 10,000 RPM drive uses more than a standard 7,200.

Phreejak, please note that 18A each, on dual 12 rails, does not mean that it supplies 36 amps. You need to look at the PSU chart for the maximum combined wattage for all 12v rails combined. Just keep that in mind, and do not let it fool you :) 


How can you prove this boost in performance? Sometimes when we upgrade parts on a PC we want to see a boost in performance and somehow convince ourselves that our PC is now faster. I'm not saying that sometimes a PC doesn't run that bit better with a better PSU but I don't see it being a major thing and if you're using a decent brand name PSU a 500W will probably do just fine.

Of course a 10k drive will use a bit more power but it's not going to be that much more.
August 17, 2006 12:45:00 AM

Agreed, an Antec TP 2.0 500W is a good reliable psu that you shouldnt have any trouble with, unless you plan on overclocking both your gpu and cpu would i ever recommend something like a 550 or at the max a 600W psu, even so that Antec should handle that entire system nicely
a b ) Power supply
August 17, 2006 1:15:03 AM

The Antec Smartpower will work OK for you, but I think there are better options.

1. As IcY18 alluded to, the TP series Antec PSUs (TruePower) are of better quality, though they do cost a little more. I have used these without problems for years. The voltages are in spec and rock steady over time.

2. FSP typically offers the best value. I will steer you to one of their better units (more $ than you may want to spend).
FSP FSP550-80GLC-R 550w 12v:4x15a 20+4pin $113+8 8/06
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817104018
High build quality, active PFC (more efficient) and will also last for years.
August 17, 2006 1:51:39 AM

Quote:
I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp


Absolute rubbish. 400W is the reccomended PSU for using this graphics card in your typical PC. A 10,000 RPM drive doesn't use much power at all...... so it's not something that you really need to consider in the big scheme of things.

If you get a decent brand with some strong rails and the right amount of power on the right rails you don't need a 750 watt PSU. A 500W PSU will probably do as long as it can punch out enough power for the graphics card. Maybe a 550W or 600W to be on the extremely safe side but all a 750W PSU is going to do is use more power in the long run.

I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.

Put his configuration into that PSU calculator and tell me what the reccomended wattage is for his system.......



I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.


hahaha what great advice!!! Running lower power than what a card demands will burn out the card!!! It is always better to be safe than sorry! If you are spening all that cash and end up breaking your computer over the power supply, it would be sad. Since you don't have to pay too much more money for a upgraded psu.
August 17, 2006 2:06:20 AM

Quote:
I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp


I ran a 7800 GT with a 3.2 P4, 2 120 HD, 2 DVD-RW, 1.5 gig of pc 5300, and two case fans for 9 months on a dell 350 watt psu.

My total draw at the case with a meter was under 325 watts. I moved to a 420 watt unit when I upgraded to a 1900xtx, but the 350 is still purring along in anothe rmachine.

Most computers draw far less power than they are rated at by the mfg's.

Quality is usually far more important than total wattage, within limits of course. A 420-500 watt PSU should power anything short of a SLI/Crossfire setup.

Absolute rubbish. 400W is the reccomended PSU for using this graphics card in your typical PC. A 10,000 RPM drive doesn't use much power at all...... so it's not something that you really need to consider in the big scheme of things.

If you get a decent brand with some strong rails and the right amount of power on the right rails you don't need a 750 watt PSU. A 500W PSU will probably do as long as it can punch out enough power for the graphics card. Maybe a 550W or 600W to be on the extremely safe side but all a 750W PSU is going to do is use more power in the long run.

I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.

Put his configuration into that PSU calculator and tell me what the reccomended wattage is for his system.......



I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.


hahaha what great advice!!! Running lower power than what a card demands will burn out the card!!! It is always better to be safe than sorry! If you are spening all that cash and end up breaking your computer over the power supply, it would be sad. Since you don't have to pay too much more money for a upgraded psu.
August 17, 2006 2:12:51 AM

Quote:
I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp


I ran a 7800 GT with a 3.2 P4, 2 120 HD, 2 DVD-RW, 1.5 gig of pc 5300, and two case fans for 9 months on a dell 350 watt psu.

My total draw at the case with a meter was under 325 watts. I moved to a 420 watt unit when I upgraded to a 1900xtx, but the 350 is still purring along in anothe rmachine.

Most computers draw far less power than they are rated at by the mfg's.

Quality is usually far more important than total wattage, within limits of course. A 420-500 watt PSU should power anything short of a SLI/Crossfire setup.

Absolute rubbish. 400W is the reccomended PSU for using this graphics card in your typical PC. A 10,000 RPM drive doesn't use much power at all...... so it's not something that you really need to consider in the big scheme of things.

If you get a decent brand with some strong rails and the right amount of power on the right rails you don't need a 750 watt PSU. A 500W PSU will probably do as long as it can punch out enough power for the graphics card. Maybe a 550W or 600W to be on the extremely safe side but all a 750W PSU is going to do is use more power in the long run.

I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.

Put his configuration into that PSU calculator and tell me what the reccomended wattage is for his system.......



I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.


hahaha what great advice!!! Running lower power than what a card demands will burn out the card!!! It is always better to be safe than sorry! If you are spening all that cash and end up breaking your computer over the power supply, it would be sad. Since you don't have to pay too much more money for a upgraded psu.

Considering that @ 100% usage a PSU calculator rated my PC at only 285W I was quite happy with it. Ran stable as anything and never gave problems.

One should always bear in mind that a recommendation is based on a worse than standard situation. IE Power guzzling Prescott CPU and non brand name PSU. My PC had a brand name PSU and a Northwood core CPU so it was fairly safe.....
August 17, 2006 3:33:37 AM

Quote:

How can you prove this boost in performance? Sometimes when we upgrade parts on a PC we want to see a boost in performance and somehow convince ourselves that our PC is now faster. I'm not saying that sometimes a PC doesn't run that bit better with a better PSU but I don't see it being a major thing and if you're using a decent brand name PSU a 500W will probably do just fine.


I overclocked everything in that PC, and had 4 10,000 RPM drives in RAID, a Pentium 820 @ 3.6, etc. It all required a lot more power than I had, so when I upgraded, I got the power I needed and it roared. My point is that if you plan to use lots of power, leave at least a tad bit of room, so that if any of the components need it, it will be there. Other reasons may be that you might add some components, and might not want to upgrade again.

360maxi, please include helpful information in your posts, that's what forums are for. Newf's post is a great example.

NOTE: I do not make myself believe things, such as that I have a faster rig when it is not. 20-30 FPS boost is noticeable, not something that my brain makes me believe.

PaperShredder: I suggest you pick what you think that you need and do not rely completely on other sources. Try to think of what you may add in the future, or maybe what you may plan to overclock. Paying 40 extra bucks for 100 extra watts wont kill you, but it could save you the cost of purchasing a whole new power supply, or a supplemental one in the future. It all comes down to your choice, so make sure that you choose the right one and pick carefully ;) 
August 17, 2006 8:22:15 AM

that 500w psu should be fine.

to whoever mentioned a high end core 2duo in power needs -core2duo is amazing because it uses a ridicuoulsly LOW amt of power. it is less then any amd processore (even the low consumtion ones i believe)

you said u have one hdd.

unless your using that card, a power hungry system , 10 case fans, 5hdds and like 3 optical drives then your safe. you could go 550 if you dont mind the xtra few dollars but honestly 500w should be easily enough
August 17, 2006 12:27:39 PM

Quote:

How can you prove this boost in performance? Sometimes when we upgrade parts on a PC we want to see a boost in performance and somehow convince ourselves that our PC is now faster. I'm not saying that sometimes a PC doesn't run that bit better with a better PSU but I don't see it being a major thing and if you're using a decent brand name PSU a 500W will probably do just fine.


I overclocked everything in that PC, and had 4 10,000 RPM drives in RAID, a Pentium 820 @ 3.6, etc. It all required a lot more power than I had, so when I upgraded, I got the power I needed and it roared. My point is that if you plan to use lots of power, leave at least a tad bit of room, so that if any of the components need it, it will be there. Other reasons may be that you might add some components, and might not want to upgrade again.

360maxi, please include helpful information in your posts, that's what forums are for. Newf's post is a great example.

NOTE: I do not make myself believe things, such as that I have a faster rig when it is not. 20-30 FPS boost is noticeable, not something that my brain makes me believe.

PaperShredder: I suggest you pick what you think that you need and do not rely completely on other sources. Try to think of what you may add in the future, or maybe what you may plan to overclock. Paying 40 extra bucks for 100 extra watts wont kill you, but it could save you the cost of purchasing a whole new power supply, or a supplemental one in the future. It all comes down to your choice, so make sure that you choose the right one and pick carefully ;) 

The OP doesn't mention anything about OC'ing his rig. 40 dollars is a lot of money when you can put it towards making your PC run better rather than making it use more power and waste your money.
August 17, 2006 1:25:21 PM

Quote:

How can you prove this boost in performance? Sometimes when we upgrade parts on a PC we want to see a boost in performance and somehow convince ourselves that our PC is now faster. I'm not saying that sometimes a PC doesn't run that bit better with a better PSU but I don't see it being a major thing and if you're using a decent brand name PSU a 500W will probably do just fine.


I overclocked everything in that PC, and had 4 10,000 RPM drives in RAID, a Pentium 820 @ 3.6, etc. It all required a lot more power than I had, so when I upgraded, I got the power I needed and it roared. My point is that if you plan to use lots of power, leave at least a tad bit of room, so that if any of the components need it, it will be there. Other reasons may be that you might add some components, and might not want to upgrade again.

360maxi, please include helpful information in your posts, that's what forums are for. Newf's post is a great example.

NOTE: I do not make myself believe things, such as that I have a faster rig when it is not. 20-30 FPS boost is noticeable, not something that my brain makes me believe.

PaperShredder: I suggest you pick what you think that you need and do not rely completely on other sources. Try to think of what you may add in the future, or maybe what you may plan to overclock. Paying 40 extra bucks for 100 extra watts wont kill you, but it could save you the cost of purchasing a whole new power supply, or a supplemental one in the future. It all comes down to your choice, so make sure that you choose the right one and pick carefully ;) 

I agree with 306maxi on this, if he just wants his comp to run stable without OCing then a 500W antec will suit him perfectly. If you are planning on OCing then it is a different story, but it doesnt sound like you want to. As for being futureproof, rumors that the next gen of video cards are going to take up to 300W themselves means youw ould have to get a pretty huge power supply to make it totally safe for the future.
August 17, 2006 2:10:13 PM

Quote:
I would strongly recommend you NOT get only 500 watts for that entire setup. I used to power my old 7800GT on 500 Watts, and when I upgraded to a more efficient 600 Watt one, it was like a new machine. That setup there has a 7950GX2 which is a hell of a lot more than a 7800GT, and you have a 10,000 RPM drive and a high end Core 2 (which I assume you plan to overclock).

The 7950GX2 does not need 27A to itself. 400 Watts is the MINIMUM, which means if you have low power-consumption parts. Just go for a 600 Watt at least to be safe. Personally I would go with a 750Watt, since I plan to overclock everything including my 7950.

Look at this it may also help:
http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp


Absolute rubbish. 400W is the reccomended PSU for using this graphics card in your typical PC. A 10,000 RPM drive doesn't use much power at all...... so it's not something that you really need to consider in the big scheme of things.

If you get a decent brand with some strong rails and the right amount of power on the right rails you don't need a 750 watt PSU. A 500W PSU will probably do as long as it can punch out enough power for the graphics card. Maybe a 550W or 600W to be on the extremely safe side but all a 750W PSU is going to do is use more power in the long run.

I used a 6600GT on a 350W PSU when it reccomended a 400W PSU on the graphics card box and it was just fine.

Put his configuration into that PSU calculator and tell me what the reccomended wattage is for his system.......
I am using a 6600GT with my 250 watt HP power supply and it is running fine...
August 17, 2006 2:23:01 PM

I would say the 500W is fine. But remember this, Ideally, your power supply should only be going at about 70-80% of its maximum wattage at full system load. Even if its name brand, burning it at 100% all the time won't do it any good. Always make sure you have some head room.

Also, a bigger power supply doesn't cost more in energy bills, because power supplies only take as much voltage as they need. What a good name brand power supply does is have a higher efficency rating (different from how much you want it to deliver to the system). The better the efficency rating, the less energy is consumed (i.e. heat) to deliver you your power, therefore saving you money in the long run.

Like say, you have a 500W power supply with 85% efficeny. Then it takes around 588W to deliver 500W of power.

Either way, 500W should be fine, but never skimp out on a PSU.
August 20, 2006 1:00:17 AM

Thank you all for responding to my question.

The E6600 arrived on Friday. Since most of you thought that a 500W Antec power supply would be adequate for my configuration, I used it.

The computer has now been powered on for around 48 hours. It has been encoding DivX most of that time, I have also played BF2 for a few hours. No issues to report, 100% stable.
August 20, 2006 1:03:20 AM

Quote:
I would say the 500W is fine. But remember this, Ideally, your power supply should only be going at about 70-80% of its maximum wattage at full system load. Even if its name brand, burning it at 100% all the time won't do it any good. Always make sure you have some head room.

Also, a bigger power supply doesn't cost more in energy bills, because power supplies only take as much voltage as they need. What a good name brand power supply does is have a higher efficency rating (different from how much you want it to deliver to the system). The better the efficency rating, the less energy is consumed (i.e. heat) to deliver you your power, therefore saving you money in the long run.

Like say, you have a 500W power supply with 85% efficeny. Then it takes around 588W to deliver 500W of power.

Either way, 500W should be fine, but never skimp out on a PSU.


Some PSU's like the Antec NeoHE range are rated to run at the rated wattage 24/7 @ a certain temp. So I don't really think you're going to burn out your PSU by running it at or near 100% at least not with a decent brand name PSU like Antec

Quote:
Thank you all for responding to my question.

The E6600 arrived on Friday. Since most of you thought that a 500W Antec power supply would be adequate for my configuration, I used it.

The computer has now been powered on for around 48 hours. It has been encoding DivX most of that time, I have also played BF2 for a few hours. No issues to report, 100% stable.


Hey papershredder. Where are you from in Perth? I'm from Perth :)  Just moved overseas two months ago.
!