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Any computer engineers on this forum?

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August 16, 2006 10:53:01 PM

does anybody in this forum work in computer engineering? or any other field where they develop computer components?

people around here seem to know a fair amout about the basic pieces of computer components, so i was wondering if anybody here actually works in that field

Partially because i want to know who to really trust on the forums :p 

but also somewhat because that is a field i may want to go into (insted of programming) and i want to know what it's like
August 16, 2006 11:00:22 PM

You learn who to trust by reading forum posts.
It's not what you do but who you are...
August 16, 2006 11:48:38 PM

I am a grad student working towards a PhD in Computer Engineering and I can tell you there are plenty of students in the classes with me and even individuals in the real work force I met during internships that knew less about computers than some I knew when they were back in grade school.
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August 16, 2006 11:48:45 PM

Im studyign CE, and all I can say is:

Computer Engineering >>>>>>> Computer Science


:p 

~prime
August 16, 2006 11:55:19 PM

Quote:
Im studyign CE, and all I can say is:

Computer Engineering >>>>>>> Computer Science


:p 

~prime


Bad engineer! all that's needed is '>>' to express "orders of magnitude greater"
August 17, 2006 12:01:00 AM

I am a Computer Engineer although I don't work in the industry since I just graduated. (However I did my fair amount of designing 8-bit processors at the lowest level, and I love it :D , especially when they run faster than the rest of the designs in my class :twisted: )

And I agree with NewF, having a degree in computer engineering or working in the field does not mean you know more stuff than anyone else. It just means that you know more stuff about the particular technology you are working on. I met high school kids that know a lot more about current technology and what is better compared to what than a lot of fellow engineers.
August 17, 2006 12:13:47 AM

Quote:
Im studyign CE, and all I can say is:

Computer Engineering >>>>>>> Computer Science


:p 

~prime


Bad engineer! all that's needed is '>>' to express "orders of magnitude greater"

Shame on me, I will beg for forgiveness from the Engineering Gods :oops: 

~prime
August 17, 2006 12:14:46 AM

If you major in computer engineering, get a minor degree in computer
science. Or see what it would take to get dual degrees.
August 17, 2006 12:17:06 AM

Quote:
I am a grad student working towards a PhD in Computer Engineering and I can tell you there are plenty of students in the classes with me and even individuals in the real work force I met during internships that knew less about computers than some I knew when they were back in grade school.

I can second that opinion.
I graduated w/ a CompE degree and some of the folks in my classes weren't exactly the best people you'd have troubleshooting your computer. Sure they have laptops but troubleshooting them was always a joy to watch. Just because it has the word "computer" in it doesn't mean that the people w/ the degrees will be experts. They'll know something, but you really get a feel for the bad eggs once they start talking.

The best way to tell if someone's good is to read what they say, and double check it against other sources. Also its always a plus if they know how to admit they're wrong. No one's perfect.

I have to say for computer troubleshooting, I learned more by experience than I ever did in school. Unless you're talking about dropping me off on an island and me having to build a computer from coconut fibers - then my degree would help. Although I'm not entirely sure I could build one from coconut fibers - don't quote me on it. :p 

ps. have to say that i think if you go computer engineering, you'll get programming and hardware. less emphasis on programming, but you'll still be forced to know a fair amount.
August 17, 2006 12:17:10 AM

Quote:
does anybody in this forum work in computer engineering? or any other field where they develop computer components?

people around here seem to know a fair amout about the basic pieces of computer components, so i was wondering if anybody here actually works in that field

Partially because i want to know who to really trust on the forums :p 

but also somewhat because that is a field i may want to go into (insted of programming) and i want to know what it's like


I’m not a CE as you have requested. I only have a degree in ME, but I will offer my unqualified opinion nonetheless. On this forum, the people to trust are the ones who search for and post information pertaining to both sides of a theory or debate, weigh the evidence and post a conclusion while offering the reasoning behind their conclusion. Individuals who can differentiate between opinion and fact and will readily admit when they do not know something or are wrong. Two such individuals come to mind. There are others, but these two seem to be available most often. They are JumpingJack, and LtCommander Data

Just my 2cents


Peace
August 17, 2006 12:31:57 AM

I switched from Computer Engineering to Software Engineering. Too much math and physics. Also while I was interested in the topics, I was just getting bored in the classes. Programming is far more fun.
August 17, 2006 1:01:29 AM

yeah, my question was more towards the second part, since i have to choose soon

Quote:
However I did my fair amount of designing 8-bit processors at the lowest level, and I love it :D  , especially when they run faster than the rest of the designs in my class :twisted: )


sweet

Quote:
I switched from Computer Engineering to Software Engineering. Too much math and physics. Also while I was interested in the topics, I was just getting bored in the classes. Programming is far more fun.


programming is indeed fun, but i would probably go to the comp sci side of programming
August 17, 2006 2:04:38 AM

Im entering college this fall and am planning to be an electronic and computer engineer (this university offers it as a dual degree kind of thing)

So i dont really know tons of the stuff... but ive built 4 personal computers, overclocked 2 and ive built 2 for clients. I also worked at a networking company for a while, doing mostly PC repair type of work. So i know plenty about PCs.
August 17, 2006 2:05:12 AM

Quote:

(Disclaimer: This is a running joke among forum regulars. Jack)


i have noticed that running joke a few times, why does he have such a reputation?
a c 99 à CPUs
August 17, 2006 2:08:58 AM

Contrary to what my handle might lead you to believe, I am not a computer engineer. I'm a biological engineer. However, BEs can do a lot of work in instrumentation design (think designing MRIs and such) and that can get into the nuts 'n bolts of microelectronics and computer programming in an awfully big hurry. I've done a little programming and some hardware work, but mostly it's been more traditional engineering work like bio-material design and testing. I know my computer stuff mostly from exposure to it in the "real world" with some formal training in programming and circuits. Thus I can find my way around a mother- or breadboard, electronics DK, and a text editor making a .c file, but I'm much more an expert in things such as biological materials (i.e. sutures, implants, prostheses, etc.) and the medical aspect of the field than the EE-like part.

Like an earlier poster said, it's not what you took in school, it's what you know/remember about a topic, regardless of how it got up there.
a c 99 à CPUs
August 17, 2006 2:11:58 AM

It's St. Patrick who's the patron saint of engineers that you may want to appease...
August 17, 2006 3:26:32 AM

i have 3 degrees: Computer Science, Graphic Design, and Game Art and Design.
August 17, 2006 3:43:42 AM

I'm a Computer Engineer graduate as well. However, here in the Philippines we are commonly mistaken for computer programmers.

Right now, I'm a developer using .NET, Web Graphics and Animation designer and in the field of Software engineering and working for clients in the US. :) 
August 17, 2006 3:58:31 AM

Long time reader, basically every thread daily, short time poster. I have witnessed many BaronMatrix'isms and each time (after reading the 2 pages of hate responses :p ) I wonder why he/she/it comes back to the forums on a never ending basis.
August 17, 2006 4:05:33 AM

hell ya!... Sophmore at Virginia tech for Computer Engineering.

CPE> CS 8)
August 17, 2006 5:10:02 AM

Quote:
Im studyign CE, and all I can say is:

Computer Engineering >>>>>>> Computer Science


:p 

~prime


go uninstall all your software and firmware and see how cool your computer is... =D then tell me CE >> CSC.

csc ftw!
August 17, 2006 5:10:07 AM

Quote:
Long time reader, basically every thread daily, short time poster. I have witnessed many BaronMatrix'isms and each time (after reading the 2 pages of hate responses :p ) I wonder why he/she/it comes back to the forums on a never ending basis.


It's pretty simple, he wants to champion AMD --- nothing wrong with that, corvetteguy does the same thing, the difference is corvetteguy rationalizes his observations and does not pretend to go beyond subject he has little experience in... in other words, corvetteguy is willing to listen, learn, and when appropriate make good points.

Baron has a hard time with this, for what ever reasons. On a serious note, Baron could make good contributions if he simply changed the way he approached the argument. In most cases, though, he does not. He often gives good 'new computer, buying this what should I do' advice and in other cases he recommends someone to stick their CPU in a block of styrofoam.

It is humorous --- and sad at times.... he would avoid my barrage if he would stop asserting himself as an expert where he clearly is not.

Tell taht to ElmOiSEviL or however he types it. He thinks i'm just soem fanatic. :wink:
August 17, 2006 5:16:10 AM

Quote:
in other cases he recommends someone to stick their CPU in a block of styrofoam.

It is humorous --- and sad at times.... he would avoid my barrage if he would stop asserting himself as an expert where he clearly is not.


I love the styrofoam one, that only happened 1 or 2 weeks ago :lol: 
August 17, 2006 10:37:13 AM

Quote:
Im studyign CE, and all I can say is:

Computer Engineering >>>>>>> Computer Science


:p 

~prime


go uninstall all your software and firmware and see how cool your computer is... =D then tell me CE >> CSC.

csc ftw!

Dude, go write all your software on punch cards and then find some way of executing them without hardware :lol:  . A computer engineer (cpe) can work as a software developer/engineer (in fact that is what a lot of people I know do), however a software engineer is unlikely, if not impossible, to work as a hardware designer.

Anyway, someone studying computer science is not just a software engineer, although a lot of people with cs (not Counterstrike) degrees do that for a living. A cs guy knows a lot about algorithms and is able to efficiently design software to squeeze every last drop of performance out of the hardware. (I guess a lot of game developers these days do not have cs degrees, or just forgot what they learned).

To the original poster. What you choose only depends on what you want to do for a living. If you like both maybe you should try getting both degrees, engineering and science. Actually I would suggest if possible to start as a dual major (the two degrees are so close, coursewise, I cannot think of a school that will not let you do it) and then if you do not like one or the other drop it.
August 17, 2006 11:17:27 AM

I have a CE degree, but most of my knowledge about PCs is from my teenage years when I built my first rig and used the old Computer Shopper to learn about new components. The degree just helped explain what was going on inside the chips.
August 17, 2006 12:23:21 PM

Quote:
in other cases he recommends someone to stick their CPU in a block of styrofoam.

It is humorous --- and sad at times.... he would avoid my barrage if he would stop asserting himself as an expert where he clearly is not.


I love the styrofoam one, that only happened 1 or 2 weeks ago :lol: 

I know, I couldn't believe it :)  ... I saw the thread pop up and thought, ok this is a simple let's help someone out --- and before I could open the thread I say 'stick it in a chunk of styrofoam', I nearly fell out of my chair.

I missed out on that incident. I went back and read it all, classic stuff.
August 17, 2006 12:57:01 PM

Quote:
So i dont really know tons of the stuff... but ive built 4 personal computers, overclocked 2 and ive built 2 for clients. I also worked at a networking company for a while, doing mostly PC repair type of work. So i know plenty about PCs.


See thats the mistake I made. I loved to build and tinker with computers before college so I thought CE was for me. But then, as I said, I realized the two are completely different. Computer engineering deals with designing and building circuits. You don't just put together computers. Make sure you realize what you're getting into.


Quote:
programming is indeed fun, but i would probably go to the comp sci side of programming


The difference between Software Engineering and Computer Science is about 3 classes. Computer Science is more theory. Software Engineering is more actual application of theory.
August 17, 2006 12:58:50 PM

Quote:
I have a CE degree, but most of my knowledge about PCs is from my teenage years when I built my first rig and used the old Computer Shopper to learn about new components. The degree just helped explain what was going on inside the chips.
Oh yeah...i remember that mag..uh...book. It was 100's of pages of ad's. LOL and heavy.
August 17, 2006 1:02:21 PM

Is this a forum about degree's or computer related issues? I to have three degree's in computer related disciplines, but I'm not here to have a circle jerk with everyone about who has what degree or who's working towards what degree! Although, I do want to commend everyone for obtaining a higher education to better there marketability in the real world, but let’s get back to why we have Toms forum, computer related issues!
August 17, 2006 1:05:40 PM

Quote:
Is this a forum about degree's or computer related issues? I to have three degree's in computer related disciplines, but I'm not here to have a circle jerk with everyone about who has what degree or who's working towards what degree! Although, I do want to commend everyone for obtaining a higher education to better there marketability in the real world, but let’s get back to why we have Toms forum, computer related issues!
OK....then vamoosssss/get and go have a single-jerk. :roll: Your opinion is not much apperciated. Do you feel superior now?
August 17, 2006 1:15:30 PM

Maybe just like a CS teamkiller he just has nothing better to do than be a pest...

Anyway, I'll also support the notion that a degree in CE doesn't mean the person knows much about current tech. Think about it: if they take 4yrs to get their degree, they started school when the Athlon XPs where the best AMD had to offer :D . Since then, I'd say there's been a few changes. Such is the current nature of technology, it outdates itself every 6 months, but as a general rule, it takes universities 2-3 years to implements new science into their programs.
Rather than a formal education, just look for the people with passion for tinkering with their machines. And best of luck to you.
Cheers.
August 17, 2006 1:46:55 PM

I just graduated with a BS in CS and am working developing in ....Vb6 8O ....gah someone kill me now.

But I learned so much about computers in general that I feel mighty confident in my knowledge. I may not know how to design a whole bunch of gates to do something complex, but I know that they're in there, and that's enough for me.
August 17, 2006 1:50:05 PM

Back in 1996, I was just your ordinary purchaser assigned to the Systems Department with an engineering degree so unrelated to computers. Until a friend mentioned www.sysdoc.pair.com. This was the site that opened my eyes to the wonderful world of computers. Soon enough, I was building PC's. Small steps lead to another and now I'm into my 8th year in developing applications. Software + hardware though still limited to PC's.
August 17, 2006 2:12:43 PM

Actually I do! What does a degree have to do with home computer related issues? Most of the people in the world don't even have degrees, but have a plethora of knowledge concerning computers. Let stay focused on what Tom’s hardware forum was created for.

Please don't feel inferior! I'm here to help?
August 17, 2006 2:19:35 PM

Quote:
The difference between Software Engineering and Computer Science is about 3 classes. Computer Science is more theory.


Classmates used to joke that CS is for people who couldn't cut it in pure math and Software Engineers were for people who couldn't cut it in pure CS.

As for Engineering, I personally avoided it - seemed fully of guys with limited imaginations(oooh beer, ooh girls, oooh I can't do real math nor physics, oooh let's just fudge the values a bit).

I do respect Aerospace Eng and Engineering Physics grads tho'...
August 17, 2006 2:42:50 PM

well if your all showing how big you poles are -so to speak-

I study electronics and electrical engineering at loughborough university UK and i not only develop electonic circuits, internal chip layouts, i program from ASM up to C++, java etc.

Currently Working at Hewlett Packard as a Research and Development solutions engineer in the tape works department.

CS sucks!! :o  you lot love the banter

x
August 17, 2006 2:49:09 PM

Lol,,, at least you try to be honest here & indicate you can't be trusted.
August 17, 2006 3:09:57 PM

I once handed a digital multimeter to an engineer so he could check the value of a fuse with it, if you don't understand what's wrong with that statement go find an electronics tech or an electrician so they can explain it to you.

The same engineer got caught with the "polarized resistor" gag.

New engineers are so much fun... ;-)

Just don't hand them a soldering iron.
August 17, 2006 3:10:46 PM

Where are all the business peeps at? :trophy:
August 17, 2006 3:13:32 PM

yes but that is true in any field with a lot of people not having a clue what there doing, there are some of us that know how to use an oscilloscope, soldering iron, and multimeter
August 17, 2006 3:22:15 PM

Quote:
Actually I do! What does a degree have to do with home computer related issues? Most of the people in the world don't even have degrees, but have a plethora of knowledge concerning computers. Let stay focused on what Tom’s hardware forum was created for.

Please don't feel inferior! I'm here to help?
Well, judging by the amount of replies to this post and views, your opinion means nothing. :tongue:
August 17, 2006 3:25:03 PM

Wow. So many youngsters with fresh new degrees. Probably grew up with computers.

When I was in college, we had just come to terms with those newfangled calculators, and had just tossed out our slide rules.

If there was a computer engineer degree, it meant something quite different from today. Transistors and bitslices ruled the day.

(I had intended to major in Biology but got sucked into software).

Don't mind me, I'm just jealous. Before Pong, the only video games were Password, and What's my Line.
August 17, 2006 3:26:25 PM

I see that! but I still stand by my opinion. You guys have fun discussing your degree's.
August 17, 2006 3:28:13 PM

I'm studying microelectronical engineering and that's nice but you must like physics and maths...

Quote:

I know, I couldn't believe it :)  ... I saw the thread pop up and thought, ok this is a simple let's help someone out --- and before I could open the thread I say 'stick it in a chunk of styrofoam', I nearly fell out of my chair.


link? 8O
Thx!
August 17, 2006 3:33:33 PM

I wear four hats :lol:  System Admin, Electrical Engineer, Software Engineer and Computer Engineer - Man my workload sucks 8)
August 17, 2006 3:51:34 PM

Quote:
I wear four hats :lol:  System Admin, Electrical Engineer, Software Engineer and Computer Engineer - Man my workload sucks 8)


With all the lay-offs happening you should be glad to even have a work load.
August 17, 2006 4:10:10 PM

You can't trust CE's and EE's to know how to troubleshoot or build computers, I learned about computers through tinkering. You at least must understand what kind of education engineers recieve.
Quote:

if they take 4yrs to get their degree, they started school when the Athlon XPs where the best AMD had to offer :D . Since then, I'd say there's been a few changes. Such is the current nature of technology, it outdates itself every 6 months.

I have not seen a single engineering program that teaches students the inner working of the most advanced processors. In fact most undergrads never get beyond designing systems with 8-bit processors. What they do is teach you how the processor works so that you can understand the new processors operate and work with them if your job requires. One assignment I designed and built a simple hadware multiplier (8-bit) out of logic gates in order to learn about it. Having done this, it only takes some extra theory to understand how the floating point units work in the conroe, and beyond that is just a great deal of optimization.

The engineering education teaches the engineer to design and understand systems in order to apply and advance them. Computer tinkerers learn facts and use their experience to solve problems, but they won't be designing custom motherboards for their computers. As far as this forum is concerned, you want to find the tinkerers which may or may not be engineers.

(BTW I have a EE degree with an emphasis on parallel processing and digital design)
August 17, 2006 4:23:42 PM

Quote:
You can't trust CE's and EE's to know how to troubleshoot or build computers, I learned about computers through tinkering. You at least must understand what kind of education engineers recieve.

if they take 4yrs to get their degree, they started school when the Athlon XPs where the best AMD had to offer :D . Since then, I'd say there's been a few changes. Such is the current nature of technology, it outdates itself every 6 months.

I have not seen a single engineering program that teaches students the inner working of the most advanced processors. In fact most undergrads never get beyond designing systems with 8-bit processors. What they do is teach you how the processor works so that you can understand the new processors operate and work with them if your job requires. One assignment I designed and built a simple hadware multiplier (8-bit) out of logic gates in order to learn about it. Having done this, it only takes some extra theory to understand how the floating point units work in the conroe, and beyond that is just a great deal of optimization.

The engineering education teaches the engineer to design and understand systems in order to apply and advance them. Computer tinkerers learn facts and use their experience to solve problems, but they won't be designing custom motherboards for their computers. As far as this forum is concerned, you want to find the tinkerers which may or may not be engineers.

(BTW I have a EE degree with an emphasis on parallel processing and digital design)Yep, hands-on experience is priceless. Theory will only get you so far.
August 17, 2006 4:58:20 PM

It's pretty much been my experience working with a lot of technicians and engineers of varying level of education and experience, that the technicians are the ones who do the most work building and troublshooting and the high level technicians have the engineers trust. The very experienced engineers who have been through many design cycles of various products are good in the lab, but the beginning engineers think they know more than they do and are generally a pain in the arse.

The short answer is just what you've been reading in this thread. Experience is what counts the most. When it comes to being able to assemble machines and troubleshoot them, it's 90% experience and you don't necessarily need to have any education in the field though it certainly doesn't hurt.

After a bit of reading it's easy to tell the people who know what they're talking about and those who are blowing smoke.
a b à CPUs
August 17, 2006 5:12:03 PM

The real question is, do you know a couple of topless dancers who need their computer fixed pronto.
!