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connecting two switches

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September 18, 2004 8:15:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

i recently decided to upgrade my network by replacing the 2 10mbps
hubs to 2 10/100 fast ethernet switches. My network spands to my
neighbor's house and his other neighbor's house(3 houses, all next to
each other). The network was fully operational with the 2 hubs. Now we
have replaced the two hubs with two switches, the problem is that
computers from one switch cannot see the computers from the other
switch. All the leds light up properly including the led corresponding
with the cable connecting both switches together. The distance of the
cable between the two switches is no more than 50meters. The cable
connecting the two switches is a straight through type cable.
According to the features list of the switch, all ports are auto
MDI/X. I try putting one end into port one (being the uplink) and
other end in another port other than port one, and it still doesn't
work.One thing that i found odd was, instead of pluggin one end of the
cable into the switch i decided to put it into my laptop, checking to
see if it would work, theoritically shouldn't it work?, i thought it
would, but it didn't. When i connect the two switches using a 1meter
long cable, it seems to connect fine, which i find odd, because it's
not as if the 50meter wire is messed, because it works fine when i
connect it to a hub. I've tried everything, im all out of ideas.

thanks in advance.

More about : connecting switches

Anonymous
September 19, 2004 5:46:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Avi wrote:

> When i connect the two switches using a 1meter
> long cable, it seems to connect fine, which i find odd, because it's
> not as if the 50meter wire is messed, because it works fine when i
> connect it to a hub.

That's probably a wrong assumption. Cables that work at 10Mbps but don't
at 100 are an almost-sure sign of split pairs.

Wires 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 need to be twisted pairs; one of them must be a
solid color, and the other striped with the same color. Say if 1 is
orange, then 2 must be striped white/orange.

If they are not like that, you have 'split pairs' and the result is
exactly what you're seeing now.

Regards,

Marco.
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 4:40:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted pair cables.


"Avi" <subhas85@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:fb765208.0409181515.4dcdc598@posting.google.com...
>i recently decided to upgrade my network by replacing the 2 10mbps
> hubs to 2 10/100 fast ethernet switches. My network spands to my
> neighbor's house and his other neighbor's house(3 houses, all next to
> each other). The network was fully operational with the 2 hubs. Now we
> have replaced the two hubs with two switches, the problem is that
> computers from one switch cannot see the computers from the other
> switch. All the leds light up properly including the led corresponding
> with the cable connecting both switches together. The distance of the
> cable between the two switches is no more than 50meters. The cable
> connecting the two switches is a straight through type cable.
> According to the features list of the switch, all ports are auto
> MDI/X. I try putting one end into port one (being the uplink) and
> other end in another port other than port one, and it still doesn't
> work.One thing that i found odd was, instead of pluggin one end of the
> cable into the switch i decided to put it into my laptop, checking to
> see if it would work, theoritically shouldn't it work?, i thought it
> would, but it didn't. When i connect the two switches using a 1meter
> long cable, it seems to connect fine, which i find odd, because it's
> not as if the 50meter wire is messed, because it works fine when i
> connect it to a hub. I've tried everything, im all out of ideas.
>
> thanks in advance.
Related resources
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 6:46:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Joe Rodriguez wrote:

> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted pair cables.

Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running gigabit and you don't need
CAT6 for _anything_.

And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got split pairs.

> "Avi" <subhas85@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:fb765208.0409181515.4dcdc598@posting.google.com...
>>i recently decided to upgrade my network by replacing the 2 10mbps
>> hubs to 2 10/100 fast ethernet switches. My network spands to my
>> neighbor's house and his other neighbor's house(3 houses, all next to
>> each other). The network was fully operational with the 2 hubs. Now we
>> have replaced the two hubs with two switches, the problem is that
>> computers from one switch cannot see the computers from the other
>> switch. All the leds light up properly including the led corresponding
>> with the cable connecting both switches together. The distance of the
>> cable between the two switches is no more than 50meters. The cable
>> connecting the two switches is a straight through type cable.
>> According to the features list of the switch, all ports are auto
>> MDI/X. I try putting one end into port one (being the uplink) and
>> other end in another port other than port one, and it still doesn't
>> work.One thing that i found odd was, instead of pluggin one end of the
>> cable into the switch i decided to put it into my laptop, checking to
>> see if it would work, theoritically shouldn't it work?, i thought it
>> would, but it didn't. When i connect the two switches using a 1meter
>> long cable, it seems to connect fine, which i find odd, because it's
>> not as if the 50meter wire is messed, because it works fine when i
>> connect it to a hub. I've tried everything, im all out of ideas.
>>
>> thanks in advance.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
September 22, 2004 7:49:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

J. Clarke wrote:


>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted pair cables.

> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running gigabit and you don't
> need
> CAT6 for _anything_.


You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in your data center.

As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long that anything
that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed is normally just a
sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that, slammed together, fail
to pass CAT5E test.
By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying "you need CAT3" as CAT5
(without E) is not easy to get these days. Again, anything you get without
the "E" these days is just poor quality parts. True, 100BASE-TX will work
on CAT3 on short distances, but only to the point where he starts caring
about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing Internet, he'll
do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a network printer
across that link or sync a relatively large database several times a day,
he'll be sorry he took that advice.


> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got split pairs.

Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as OP put it to mess
it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch that's inside the
plug ;-)

--
Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
http://www.cabling-design.com
Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
premises cabling users and pros
http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
Residential Cabling Guide
-------------------------------------


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Anonymous
September 22, 2004 8:32:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com wrote:

> J. Clarke wrote:
>
>
>>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted pair cables.
>
>> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running gigabit and you don't
>> need
>> CAT6 for _anything_.
>
>
> You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in your data center.

Nope. 10GBASE-CX4 uses quad twinax Infiniband cable, not UTP.

> As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long that anything
> that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed is normally just a
> sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that, slammed together, fail
> to pass CAT5E test.

No, that's called a rework. If the spec is for CAT5E then it gets installed
to pass 5E or the cable contractor doesn't get paid. Or if he's the
unscrupulous sort he'll use CAT3 components and tell you it's CAT7.

> By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying "you need CAT3" as CAT5
> (without E) is not easy to get these days.

No, you need CAT5 or better. 5 without the E may be hard to get, but that
doesn't mean that people don't have CAT5 cables on hand or that they don't
have CAT5 cabling installed. Every cable in the world was not installed
yesterday you know.

> Again, anything you get without
> the "E" these days is just poor quality parts. True, 100BASE-TX will work
> on CAT3 on short distances,

So what? Nobody said anything about CAT3.

> but only to the point where he starts caring
> about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing Internet, he'll
> do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a network printer
> across that link or sync a relatively large database several times a day,
> he'll be sorry he took that advice.

The point you miss is that there is a lot of installed CAT5 that was never
retested for 5E. There is no reason to replace that cabling with 5E for
100baseTX, which your statement implied was the case. There's actually no
reason to replace it for gigabit unless it fails the scan for 5E.

>> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got split pairs.
>
> Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as OP put it to mess
> it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch that's inside the
> plug ;-)
>

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
September 23, 2004 8:35:14 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

"J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message news:<cirev61a4g@news2.newsguy.com>...
> Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com wrote:
>
> > J. Clarke wrote:
> >
> >
> >>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted pair cables.
>
> >> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running gigabit and you don't
> >> need
> >> CAT6 for _anything_.
> >
> >
> > You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in your data center.
>
> Nope. 10GBASE-CX4 uses quad twinax Infiniband cable, not UTP.
>
> > As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long that anything
> > that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed is normally just a
> > sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that, slammed together, fail
> > to pass CAT5E test.
>
> No, that's called a rework. If the spec is for CAT5E then it gets installed
> to pass 5E or the cable contractor doesn't get paid. Or if he's the
> unscrupulous sort he'll use CAT3 components and tell you it's CAT7.
>
> > By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying "you need CAT3" as CAT5
> > (without E) is not easy to get these days.
>
> No, you need CAT5 or better. 5 without the E may be hard to get, but that
> doesn't mean that people don't have CAT5 cables on hand or that they don't
> have CAT5 cabling installed. Every cable in the world was not installed
> yesterday you know.
>
> > Again, anything you get without
> > the "E" these days is just poor quality parts. True, 100BASE-TX will work
> > on CAT3 on short distances,
>
> So what? Nobody said anything about CAT3.
>
> > but only to the point where he starts caring
> > about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing Internet, he'll
> > do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a network printer
> > across that link or sync a relatively large database several times a day,
> > he'll be sorry he took that advice.
>
> The point you miss is that there is a lot of installed CAT5 that was never
> retested for 5E. There is no reason to replace that cabling with 5E for
> 100baseTX, which your statement implied was the case. There's actually no
> reason to replace it for gigabit unless it fails the scan for 5E.
>
> >> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got split pairs.
> >
> > Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as OP put it to mess
> > it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch that's inside the
> > plug ;-)
> >

k i did the twist like u said here:

Wires 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 need to be twisted pairs; one of them must be a
solid color, and the other striped with the same color. Say if 1 is
orange, then 2 must be striped white/orange.

however it still doesn't work on the switch, it lights up properly,
but i can't communicate from one switch to the other, but when i
connect the twisted wire back to the hub it works fine again.
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 7:41:00 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
switches together?

-------------------------------------
Avi wrote:

> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
> news:<cirev61a4g@news2.newsguy.com>...
>> Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com wrote:
>>
>> > J. Clarke wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> >>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6 twisted
>>>>> pair cables.
>>
>> >> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running gigabit
>>>> and you don't
>> >> need
>> >> CAT6 for _anything_.
>> >
>> >
>> > You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in your
>>> data center.
>>
>> Nope. 10GBASE-CX4 uses quad twinax Infiniband cable, not UTP.
>>
>> > As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long that
>>> anything
>> > that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed is
>>> normally just a
>> > sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that, slammed
>>> together, fail
>> > to pass CAT5E test.
>>
>> No, that's called a rework. If the spec is for CAT5E then it gets
>> installed
>> to pass 5E or the cable contractor doesn't get paid. Or if he's
>> the
>> unscrupulous sort he'll use CAT3 components and tell you it's
>> CAT7.
>>
>> > By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying "you
>>> need CAT3" as CAT5
>> > (without E) is not easy to get these days.
>>
>> No, you need CAT5 or better. 5 without the E may be hard to get,
>> but that
>> doesn't mean that people don't have CAT5 cables on hand or that
>> they don't
>> have CAT5 cabling installed. Every cable in the world was not
>> installed
>> yesterday you know.
>>
>> > Again, anything you get without
>> > the "E" these days is just poor quality parts.
>>> True, 100BASE-TX will work
>> > on CAT3 on short distances,
>>
>> So what? Nobody said anything about CAT3.
>>
>> > but only to the point where he starts caring
>> > about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing
>>> Internet, he'll
>> > do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a
>>> network printer
>> > across that link or sync a relatively large database several
>>> times a day,
>> > he'll be sorry he took that advice.
>>
>> The point you miss is that there is a lot of installed CAT5 that
>> was never
>> retested for 5E. There is no reason to replace that cabling with
>> 5E for
>> 100baseTX, which your statement implied was the case. There's
>> actually no
>> reason to replace it for gigabit unless it fails the scan for 5E.
>>
>> >> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got split
>>>> pairs.
>> >
>> > Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as OP
>>> put it to mess
>> > it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch that's
>>> inside the
>> > plug ;-)
>> >

> k i did the twist like u said here:

> Wires 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 need to be twisted pairs; one of them
> must be a
> solid color, and the other striped with the same color. Say if 1 is
> orange, then 2 must be striped white/orange.

> however it still doesn't work on the switch, it lights up properly,
> but i can't communicate from one switch to the other, but when i
> connect the twisted wire back to the hub it works fine again.






##-----------------------------------------------##
Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
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no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -
comp.dcom.lans.ethernet - 2841 messages and counting!
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Anonymous
May 28, 2005 7:53:48 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

i've looked it up.. you DO need a crossover cable to connect two
switches... not the regular standard wiring that's used to connect
computers to hubs and the like. Since switches actively monitor traffic
and 'switches' them to their desitinations its like a dumbed down computer
and to connect two computers straight you need cross over cable... that I
know for sure. Hubs just lets all the ports are just like power strips.
they just connect the lines.
-------------------------------------
kangman wrote:

> I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
> switches together?

> -------------------------------------
> Avi wrote:

>> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in
>> message
>> news:<cirev61a4g@news2.newsguy.com>...
>>> Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com wrote:
>>>
>>> > J. Clarke wrote:
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6
>>>>>> twisted
>>>>>> pair cables.
>>>
>>> >> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running
>>>>> gigabit
>>>>> and you don't
>>> >> need
>>> >> CAT6 for _anything_.
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in
>>>> your
>>>> data center.
>>>
>>> Nope. 10GBASE-CX4 uses quad twinax Infiniband cable, not UTP.
>>>
>>> > As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long
>>>> that
>>>> anything
>>> > that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed
>>>> is
>>>> normally just a
>>> > sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that,
>>>> slammed
>>>> together, fail
>>> > to pass CAT5E test.
>>>
>>> No, that's called a rework. If the spec is for CAT5E then it
>>> gets
>>> installed
>>> to pass 5E or the cable contractor doesn't get paid. Or if
>>> he's
>>> the
>>> unscrupulous sort he'll use CAT3 components and tell you it's
>>> CAT7.
>>>
>>> > By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying
>>>> "you
>>>> need CAT3" as CAT5
>>> > (without E) is not easy to get these days.
>>>
>>> No, you need CAT5 or better. 5 without the E may be hard to
>>> get,
>>> but that
>>> doesn't mean that people don't have CAT5 cables on hand or
>>> that
>>> they don't
>>> have CAT5 cabling installed. Every cable in the world was not
>>> installed
>>> yesterday you know.
>>>
>>> > Again, anything you get without
>>> > the "E" these days is just poor quality parts.
>>>> True, 100BASE-TX will work
>>> > on CAT3 on short distances,
>>>
>>> So what? Nobody said anything about CAT3.
>>>
>>> > but only to the point where he starts caring
>>> > about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing
>>>> Internet, he'll
>>> > do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a
>>>> network printer
>>> > across that link or sync a relatively large database
>>>> several
>>>> times a day,
>>> > he'll be sorry he took that advice.
>>>
>>> The point you miss is that there is a lot of installed CAT5
>>> that
>>> was never
>>> retested for 5E. There is no reason to replace that cabling
>>> with
>>> 5E for
>>> 100baseTX, which your statement implied was the case. There's
>>> actually no
>>> reason to replace it for gigabit unless it fails the scan for
>>> 5E.
>>>
>>> >> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got
>>>>> split
>>>>> pairs.
>>> >
>>> > Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as
>>>> OP
>>>> put it to mess
>>> > it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch
>>>> that's
>>>> inside the
>>> > plug ;-)
>>> >

>> k i did the twist like u said here:

>> Wires 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 need to be twisted pairs; one of
>> them
>> must be a
>> solid color, and the other striped with the same color. Say if 1
>> is
>> orange, then 2 must be striped white/orange.

>> however it still doesn't work on the switch, it lights up
>> properly,
>> but i can't communicate from one switch to the other, but when i
>> connect the twisted wire back to the hub it works fine again.








> ##-----------------------------------------------##

> Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive

> http://www.cabling-design.com/forums

> no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -

> comp.dcom.lans.ethernet - 2841 messages and counting!

> ##-----------------------------------------------##






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Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
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Anonymous
May 28, 2005 7:53:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

In article <gXRle.31495$Ge2.27697@fe03.news.easynews.com>,
kangman <dk205_at_hotmail_dot_com@foo.com> wrote:
>
>i've looked it up.. you DO need a crossover cable to connect two
>switches... not the regular standard wiring that's used to connect
>computers to hubs and the like. Since switches actively monitor traffic
>and 'switches' them to their desitinations its like a dumbed down computer
>and to connect two computers straight you need cross over cable... that I
>know for sure. Hubs just lets all the ports are just like power strips.
>they just connect the lines.
>-------------------------------------
>kangman wrote:
>
>> I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
>> switches together?
>
>> -------------------------------------



It depends on the model. Some switches have an uplink jack, some
don't. Some have a dip switch next to one jack to select straight or
xover cable.

--
a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:28:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

dk205_at_hotmail_dot_com@foo.com (kangman) wrote:
>I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
>switches together?

As always, the definitive answer is "it depends". Some require
crossover cables, some have dual connectors for one port that are
labelled "uplink", some have switches to select normal or uplink, some
do auto MIDX.

If the port isn't labeled uplink or switchable, then a crossover cable
isn't the wrong answer. Mostly I'd say you have to try it, but have a
crossover cable on hand...
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:50:17 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

kangman wrote:

> I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
> switches together?
>

Not necessarily. Many switches have an uplink port and gigabit switches
don't need an uplink port or crossover.
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:52:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

kangman wrote:

> i've looked it up.. you DO need a crossover cable to connect two
> switches... not the regular standard wiring that's used to connect
> computers to hubs and the like.

Many switches have an uplink port, which does the crossover. Some have a
second connector for the crossover. Some have a switch and some
autoconfigure. Gigabit switches figure it out automagically.
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 8:00:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

kangman wrote:

>
> i've looked it up.. you DO need a crossover cable to connect two
> switches...

Unless you don't.

As several people said, you may have an uplink port or you may have a
crossover switch or you may have a switch that can autodetect and adapt for
pairing.

Autodetection of pairing is part of the gigabit standard and any gigabit
switch that lacks this capability is broken.

> not the regular standard wiring that's used to connect
> computers to hubs and the like. Since switches actively monitor traffic
> and 'switches' them to their desitinations its like a dumbed down computer
> and to connect two computers straight you need cross over cable... that I
> know for sure. Hubs just lets all the ports are just like power strips.
> they just connect the lines.

However (a) you need a crossover cable to connect two hubs just as you do
two switches (unless there an uplink port or crossover switch) and (b) most
hubs sold today are actually switches.

> -------------------------------------
> kangman wrote:
>
>> I'm not certain but don't you need a cross over cable to connect two
>> switches together?
>
>> -------------------------------------
>> Avi wrote:
>
>>> "J. Clarke" <jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote in
>>> message
>>> news:<cirev61a4g@news2.newsguy.com>...
>>>> Dmitri(Cabling-Design.com wrote:
>>>>
>>>> > J. Clarke wrote:
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >>> Make sure all your cables are CAT 5e or CAT 6
>>>>>>> twisted
>>>>>>> pair cables.
>>>>
>>>> >> Why? You don't need CAT5E unless you're running
>>>>>> gigabit
>>>>>> and you don't
>>>> >> need
>>>> >> CAT6 for _anything_.
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > You may still want that CAT6 to run the 10GBASE-CX4 in
>>>>> your
>>>>> data center.
>>>>
>>>> Nope. 10GBASE-CX4 uses quad twinax Infiniband cable, not UTP.
>>>>
>>>> > As far as CAT5E goes, CAT5E has been around for so long
>>>>> that
>>>>> anything
>>>> > that's not called 5E and is relative recently installed
>>>>> is
>>>>> normally just a
>>>> > sloppy, carelessly installed CAT5E components that,
>>>>> slammed
>>>>> together, fail
>>>> > to pass CAT5E test.
>>>>
>>>> No, that's called a rework. If the spec is for CAT5E then it
>>>> gets
>>>> installed
>>>> to pass 5E or the cable contractor doesn't get paid. Or if
>>>> he's
>>>> the
>>>> unscrupulous sort he'll use CAT3 components and tell you it's
>>>> CAT7.
>>>>
>>>> > By saying you do not need CAT5E you are implying
>>>>> "you
>>>>> need CAT3" as CAT5
>>>> > (without E) is not easy to get these days.
>>>>
>>>> No, you need CAT5 or better. 5 without the E may be hard to
>>>> get,
>>>> but that
>>>> doesn't mean that people don't have CAT5 cables on hand or
>>>> that
>>>> they don't
>>>> have CAT5 cabling installed. Every cable in the world was not
>>>> installed
>>>> yesterday you know.
>>>>
>>>> > Again, anything you get without
>>>> > the "E" these days is just poor quality parts.
>>>>> True, 100BASE-TX will work
>>>> > on CAT3 on short distances,
>>>>
>>>> So what? Nobody said anything about CAT3.
>>>>
>>>> > but only to the point where he starts caring
>>>> > about the actual throughput. If all he needs is browsing
>>>>> Internet, he'll
>>>> > do just fine. If he's going to print large graphics on a
>>>>> network printer
>>>> > across that link or sync a relatively large database
>>>>> several
>>>>> times a day,
>>>> > he'll be sorry he took that advice.
>>>>
>>>> The point you miss is that there is a lot of installed CAT5
>>>> that
>>>> was never
>>>> retested for 5E. There is no reason to replace that cabling
>>>> with
>>>> 5E for
>>>> 100baseTX, which your statement implied was the case. There's
>>>> actually no
>>>> reason to replace it for gigabit unless it fails the scan for
>>>> 5E.
>>>>
>>>> >> And CAT 9000 doesn't do you any good if it's got
>>>>>> split
>>>>>> pairs.
>>>> >
>>>> > Absolutely agree, it does not take 50 meters of cable as
>>>>> OP
>>>>> put it to mess
>>>> > it up. Can easily be messed up within that half inch
>>>>> that's
>>>>> inside the
>>>> > plug ;-)
>>>> >
>
>>> k i did the twist like u said here:
>
>>> Wires 1 & 2 and 3 & 6 need to be twisted pairs; one of
>>> them
>>> must be a
>>> solid color, and the other striped with the same color. Say if 1
>>> is
>>> orange, then 2 must be striped white/orange.
>
>>> however it still doesn't work on the switch, it lights up
>>> properly,
>>> but i can't communicate from one switch to the other, but when i
>>> connect the twisted wire back to the hub it works fine again.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> ##-----------------------------------------------##
>
>> Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
>
>> http://www.cabling-design.com/forums
>
>> no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -
>
>> comp.dcom.lans.ethernet - 2841 messages and counting!
>
>> ##-----------------------------------------------##
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ##-----------------------------------------------##
> Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
> http://www.cabling-design.com/forums
> no-spam read and post WWW interface to your favorite newsgroup -
> comp.dcom.lans.ethernet - 2842 messages and counting!
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--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
January 10, 2012 8:23:14 PM

Are you using windows 7
and in windows 7 your home group is set but in two switches you must homegroups on both sides and have too join them on both sides.
And go to network sharing center and in left go for the change advanced sharing setting the turn on every thing and turn off the password.
Reply me is any problem occurs
January 10, 2012 9:33:48 PM

hassam_45 said:
Are you using windows 7
and in windows 7 your home group is set but in two switches you must homegroups on both sides and have too join them on both sides.
And go to network sharing center and in left go for the change advanced sharing setting the turn on every thing and turn off the password.
Reply me is any problem occurs


PROBABLY NOT -- Seeing that the POST is from 2004 !!!! (WIN7 was not released yet ) -- TRY checking the date on posts before posting a reply ! :D 
!