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setting up an internet connection with 2 cpus

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  • Routers
  • Internet Connection
  • Internet
  • Networking
Last response: in Networking
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August 6, 2003 5:32:13 AM

warning : complete noob talking here...

is it possible to connect 2 computers to the internet with a hub without requiring a software and a host ? or do i absolutely need a router ? which type of cable is necessary for internet sharing and home network ?

thx for your support

More about : setting internet connection cpus

August 6, 2003 10:54:27 AM

Quote:
without requiring a software and a host

Software for internet connections is built into the operating system. A host? Whaddaya mean by that? You need a Service Provider.

If you're using DSL, you need a modem. A hub will work with this. Cable are standard 'straight-thru' Cat 5 UTP, with RJ-45 connectors. A switch is better though, for PC to PC file transfers, and for minimising bandwidth loss.

A router with a built in switch and modem is my personal preference. Ties the whole thing into one little piece of kit. Multi port one of course for your needs. You'll also need a Network Interface Card (NIC) on each PC.

You'll also need filters for your phone line, or a master filter wall plate. A cable from the wall plate to the router/modem will be needed, and usually is RJ-11 type.

<A HREF="http://www.adslguide.org.uk/howitworks/" target="_new">Here's</A> a link showing how ADSL works. It's based on UK set-ups, but it'll help.

<A HREF="http://www.mplsgeeks.com/networkcables/cableprint.html" target="_new">An excellent cabling link</A>

Try a search engine for hardware reviews and networking tutorials.

<b><font color=blue>~ <A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new">System Specs</A> ~<font color=blue></b> :wink:
August 6, 2003 1:04:32 PM

just to add one thing to camieabz, if your ISP gives you 2 IP addresses a router isn't necessary. If you just get one IP address (like most consumer grade broadband ISP's offer) you'll need a router, or need to run ICS

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jlanka (. .)
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August 6, 2003 4:51:46 PM

Out of curiousity...

I thought that if you were assigned multiple static IPs, you were usually given from a range (8 for example). With my range, the 1st is the network, the 2nd - 5th are for users, the 6th is the router's LAN IP, the 7th is the router's WAN IP, and the 8th is the broadcast.

Surely with multiple static IPs, there is a need for a router for the sake of network and broadcast addresses? Or can they reside at the ISP, and the user's IPs just use 0.0.0.0. for default gateway?

Not sure at all about that last bit, so apologies if it sounds jibberish.

<b><font color=blue>~ <A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new">System Specs</A> ~<font color=blue></b> :wink:
August 6, 2003 7:27:50 PM

I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that some ISP's give you 2 or 3 or X depending on how much you spend. This was you only need a hub/switch. I've never had more than one myself, so I don't have any personal experience in this area.

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jlanka (. .)
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August 6, 2003 8:17:13 PM

My thinking being that if you have a single IP (static or dynamic) that IP is used by the modem, and you set up your PCs with private IPs (192.168 etc). How can you have more than one IP on the modem?

<b><font color=blue>~ <A HREF="http://forums.btvillarin.com/index.php?act=ST&f=41&t=32..." target="_new">System Specs</A> ~<font color=blue></b> :wink:
August 6, 2003 9:50:28 PM

The modem doesn't get it's own IP. If you have 2 IP's they each would go to a PC. If you have one IP. it goes to one PC (or a router if you have one). The modem is just a gateway between the broadband (ATM, whatever) and the PC(s)

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jlanka (. .)
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August 8, 2003 12:08:26 AM

if you're direct connect PC -> modem or PC -> hub -> modem, the default gateway is whatever the ISP's DHCP server serves up. This would be the same is if you were using a router between the PC/Lan and the ISP. The router gets that info from the ISP's DHCP server the same way.

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jlanka (. .)
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August 8, 2003 12:14:04 PM

OK, no prob.

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jlanka (. .)
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!