Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

local sub-domain and website the same name?

Tags:
  • Domain
  • Microsoft
  • Windows
Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
Share
January 30, 2005 3:06:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

can someone set me straight on the best way to approach
this please...

At a university a new school was added. A sub-domain to
the university webpage was created for this school and is
hosted on a seperate server (but physically on the same
network). Because of the nature of the new school it was
decided its students and faculty (who barely interact with
the rest of the university) should have their accounts and
shared resources on its own AD sub-domain. The name of
the website, and the sub-domain created are not identical
(though they are similar). Was this the right or wrong
approach? For example:

The university web page is "university.edu" (as is the AD
domain)
The new school page is "school.university.edu" however the
AD domain is a truncated version siimilar
to "sch.university.edu".

Should the AD sub domain be the same as the webpage or is
it fine the way it is? Are there pros/cons or guidelines
that should be followed?

any help (especially links to info to better understand
the right way) would be greatly appreciated.

many thanks

More about : local domain website

January 30, 2005 4:55:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

I realized what I asked wasn't quite right in some form of
the details and I was able to find the answer to my
question based on a post (that I overlooked before) that
was asking more or less the same thing.

Thanks all the same
IAN
>-----Original Message-----
>can someone set me straight on the best way to approach
>this please...
>
>At a university a new school was added. A sub-domain to
>the university webpage was created for this school and is
>hosted on a seperate server (but physically on the same
>network). Because of the nature of the new school it was
>decided its students and faculty (who barely interact
with
>the rest of the university) should have their accounts
and
>shared resources on its own AD sub-domain. The name of
>the website, and the sub-domain created are not identical
>(though they are similar). Was this the right or wrong
>approach? For example:
>
>The university web page is "university.edu" (as is the AD
>domain)
>The new school page is "school.university.edu" however
the
>AD domain is a truncated version siimilar
>to "sch.university.edu".
>
>Should the AD sub domain be the same as the webpage or is
>it fine the way it is? Are there pros/cons or guidelines
>that should be followed?
>
>any help (especially links to info to better understand
>the right way) would be greatly appreciated.
>
>many thanks
>
>.
>
Anonymous
January 30, 2005 9:21:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:22aa01c50707$293b8820$a401280a@phx.gbl,
ian <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> commented
Then Kevin replied below:
> can someone set me straight on the best way to approach
> this please...
>
> At a university a new school was added. A sub-domain to
> the university webpage was created for this school and is
> hosted on a seperate server (but physically on the same
> network). Because of the nature of the new school it was
> decided its students and faculty (who barely interact with
> the rest of the university) should have their accounts and
> shared resources on its own AD sub-domain. The name of
> the website, and the sub-domain created are not identical
> (though they are similar). Was this the right or wrong
> approach? For example:
>
> The university web page is "university.edu" (as is the AD
> domain)
> The new school page is "school.university.edu" however the
> AD domain is a truncated version siimilar
> to "sch.university.edu".
>
> Should the AD sub domain be the same as the webpage or is
> it fine the way it is? Are there pros/cons or guidelines
> that should be followed?
>
> any help (especially links to info to better understand
> the right way) would be greatly appreciated.

Actually it is fine the way it is, if the public domain name were the same
as the AD domain, anyone accessing the public websites from the AD members
would not be able to use school.university.edu. From the AD members this
name must resolve to the IP of the domain controller that has file sharing
enabled for Group Policies to be properly applied.

By choosing this different name you bypassed having a name conflict.

As for the members of the parent domain, the only way they could use
university.edu to access the website, is to have the website on the domain
controller or add www to the domain name. If university.edu resolves to the
web server then those member clients will attempt to get the group policies
from the web server.



--
Best regards,
Kevin D4 Dad Goodknecht Sr. [MVP]
Hope This Helps
===================================
When responding to posts, please "Reply to Group"
via your newsreader so that others may learn and
benefit from your issue, to respond directly to
me remove the nospam. from my email address.
===================================
http://www.lonestaramerica.com/
===================================
Use Outlook Express?... Get OE_Quotefix:
It will strip signature out and more
http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
===================================
Keep a back up of your OE settings and folders
with OEBackup:
http://www.oehelp.com/OEBackup/Default.aspx
===================================
Related resources
!