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My new e6400 runs hot. Please help!

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August 18, 2006 10:32:16 PM

This is my first computer build. I've got an Asus P5B board and an e6400 with stock heatsink. I used Arctic Silver 5 (removed the paste that came on the heatsink, and in the process made some minor scratches on it).

I haven't touched any overclock settings, but already the PC Probe II program shows my CPU is at 60 degrees with no load! I thought Core 2 Duo was supposed to run really cool. Another thing, I read that the stock VCORE for e6400 was 1.3V stock. My Vcore is reading at 1.15V.

Also, I'm getting no sound from the motherboard's built in audio, even though I installed the drivers, and from XP's perspective everything's hunky dory.

Please help!
Thanks,
Matt.

More about : e6400 runs hot

August 18, 2006 10:35:33 PM

Bit more info. I have an Antec Solo case, which has a 120mm fan in back, and I'm using the optional 2 92mm intake fans in the front. Power is Seasonic 430.

The air blowing out the back of the computer is cool. The air blowing up from the CPU fan is warm (warmer than luke warm, maybe 85F).
August 18, 2006 10:36:54 PM

Does the bottom of the heatsink FEEL like 60C?

Try reseating the HSF, heard that can help sometimes.
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August 18, 2006 10:43:03 PM

Fins on the heatsink are nowhere even close to 60C. They're just a bit warm to the touch, much like the air flow from the CPU fan.

Either the CPU temp sensor is totally off, or I have no contact between the CPU and the heatsink. Any ideas what I may have done wrong? I put a dab of Arctic Silver 5 on top of CPU (as Arctic instructs), then added heatsink and clicked it in place.
August 18, 2006 10:57:28 PM

How much AS5 did you use? Hopefully a roughly 2-grain-of-rice sized drop, not a big glop of AS5.

You could try two things to determine whether the sensor is accurate:

1. Turn off the heatsink's fan, run something CPU intensive, and run RMClock (http://cpu.rightmark.org/products/rmclock.shtml) and watch when the system throttles. If it throttles at 80-90C according to PC Probe, your CPU is definitely toasty, and the heatsink is not doing its job. Reseat the HSF.
2. Find another P5B user, and find out whether the temperature sensor is totally off for your motherboard model.
August 18, 2006 11:02:25 PM

Well if you're not experiencing any crashes or throttling then.. you should be fine. It is likely that your temp sensor is very off.. I mean if the air feels lukewarm then its fine.

The lower Vcore is probably do to the fact of Speedstep... I don't know if it actually lowers the v.core when it drops the multiplier though.
August 19, 2006 11:27:43 PM

FYI...fixed my sound problem. Had the stereo plug in the wrong green socket (there's a second one that's greenish). Oops.

My CPU's are still running hot (about 50C) after remounting the stock heat sink with the perfect amount of AS5 (per AS5's instructions). Not sure what to do, as I want to overclock it.
August 20, 2006 12:22:55 AM

I've read that people who install 775 socket HSF will prolly have to keep trying till they get it right.

Unless you have bad case airflow.

I'd recommend taking the MB out of the PC case to be sure all four corners are in when you try again, especially looking at the back of the MB for those pins.

You could download ThrottleWatch, if you believe your having sensor problems:

ThrottleWatch

Should be able to tell if it starts to over heat, and wants to throttle back.
August 20, 2006 12:43:02 AM

i also built a computer with P5B but the only difference is that i got an E6600 and i think my sensor is also way off because it shows me running at anywhere from 50-60C but when i went to immediately reseat the HSF... the processor was still rather cool to touch so i figured the thermal readings are bs and reseated it however sometimes the case's thermal sensor for ambient readings shows about 45C so i have no idea whats going on.

im just shrugging it off saying that as long as it doesnt shut off or fry then im fine.
August 20, 2006 1:15:27 AM

Quote:
i also built a computer with P5B but the only difference is that i got an E6600 and i think my sensor is also way off because it shows me running at anywhere from 50-60C but when i went to immediately reseat the HSF... the processor was still rather cool to touch so i figured the thermal readings are bs and reseated it however sometimes the case's thermal sensor for ambient readings shows about 45C so i have no idea whats going on.

im just shrugging it off saying that as long as it doesnt shut off or fry then im fine.


8O

Generally when your heatsink is cool to the touch, that can indicate that your heatsink/fan is not seated properly. The heat from the top of the core, is not getting tranfered to the heatsink.

Unless your MB has a specific bios fix for temp readings, you should check for that. Other then that, I'd say your sensor is working just fine. However, I wouldn't say any senor is exactly accurate.
August 20, 2006 1:43:26 AM

well if you read more carefully i said the processor itself was cool to touch not the HSF :) 

i even felt the seat for the processor on the mobo and that also was cool to touch so i have no idea... but overall the computer runs fine even at load and hasnt produced any... complications... yet so we will see
August 20, 2006 2:24:52 AM

Which means that the cpu/cooler should be fine and .. it could be just a bad temp reading.. afterall these cpus do run significantly cooler than the PentiumDs which the HSF is designed for.
August 20, 2006 2:38:02 AM

Quote:
This is my first computer build. I've got an Asus P5B board and an e6400 with stock heatsink. I used Arctic Silver 5 (removed the paste that came on the heatsink, and in the process made some minor scratches on it).

I haven't touched any overclock settings, but already the PC Probe II program shows my CPU is at 60 degrees with no load! I thought Core 2 Duo was supposed to run really cool. Another thing, I read that the stock VCORE for e6400 was 1.3V stock. My Vcore is reading at 1.15V.

Also, I'm getting no sound from the motherboard's built in audio, even though I installed the drivers, and from XP's perspective everything's hunky dory.

Please help!
Thanks,
Matt.


LOL. :lol: 
Doesn't conrunts supposed to "run cooler that Athlon X2s" :lol: 

Intel: Why do you mislead your users that way?? :oops: 
August 20, 2006 2:41:30 AM

STFU AMDroid.

Based on your other threads, you have demonstrated that you don't know what sources are trustworthy, and which ones are not.

Do you trust the temperature from an inaccurate sensor, or your finger?

Quote:
well if you read more carefully i said the processor itself was cool to touch not the HSF :Smile:
i even felt the seat for the processor on the mobo and that also was cool to touch so i have no idea... but overall the computer runs fine even at load and hasnt produced any... complications... yet so we will see
August 20, 2006 2:46:16 AM

Quote:
STFU AMDroid.

Based on your other threads, you have demonstrated that you don't know what sources are trustworthy, and which ones are not.

Do you trust the temperature from an inaccurate sensor, or your finger?

well if you read more carefully i said the processor itself was cool to touch not the HSF :Smile:
i even felt the seat for the processor on the mobo and that also was cool to touch so i have no idea... but overall the computer runs fine even at load and hasnt produced any... complications... yet so we will see


WOW, now we have a sensor epidemy. :lol:  :lol: 
Don't bring excuses, if you go to the XS forums you'll see the same trend. :) 
August 20, 2006 2:52:45 AM

LAWL, I won't feed the AMDroid.
August 20, 2006 9:45:28 AM

Quote:
well if you read more carefully i said the processor itself was cool to touch not the HSF :) 

i even felt the seat for the processor on the mobo and that also was cool to touch so i have no idea... but overall the computer runs fine even at load and hasnt produced any... complications... yet so we will see


So, if I'm understanding this correctly.. you put your finger on the CPU while it was running?

You must have really tiny fingers or something, to get your finger around/under the HSF. :lol: 

The heat is not going to be at the seat, or socket.
August 20, 2006 3:11:35 PM

Quote:
i also built a computer with P5B but the only difference is that i got an E6600 and i think my sensor is also way off because it shows me running at anywhere from 50-60C but when i went to immediately reseat the HSF... the processor was still rather cool to touch so i figured the thermal readings are bs and reseated it however sometimes the case's thermal sensor for ambient readings shows about 45C so i have no idea whats going on.

im just shrugging it off saying that as long as it doesnt shut off or fry then im fine.


Quote:
well if you read more carefully i said the processor itself was cool to touch not the HSF :) 

i even felt the seat for the processor on the mobo and that also was cool to touch so i have no idea... but overall the computer runs fine even at load and hasnt produced any... complications... yet so we will see


now if it was running at 50-60C... i really doubt it would cool down to the temperature it was when i took it out of the packaging in just a matter of 30 seconds tops
August 20, 2006 6:52:08 PM

Oh.. so you shut it down, and took the HSF off, in around 30 secs, and then put your finger on it?

Since the readings showed 50-60C, I'd say that would be a temp you physcially wouldn't want to feel with your finger, that is why you touch the heatsink.

A CPU will cool down faster then most people think, went you shut it off. Its not going to stay hot, like for say, a hot cup of coffee or tea.

I guess (not exactly a good example because of the glass) a light bulb could be somewhat of a good example. Now I'm not talking about the glass. I'm saying the filament is more like the core, as far as how fast it heats up, and cools down. The CPU core isn't big, even though it produces allot of heat. The filament in a lightbulb isn't big, but again, it produces allot of heat. I guess you could compare the E6400 to a 65Watt light bulb.

Now, you don't have to take my word for it, but that is the best I can explain the heating up and cooling down.

I guess the other question, about when you were taking the HSF off, was it hard to take off? There should have been some resistance in pulling up on it. In most cases on a good seal, you would need to twist or slide the HSF off. Also a good seated HSF can pull a CPU off its socket if your not careful.

If it wasn't a proper seated HSF, you wouldn't feel a resistance, and would come off easy. I haven't done a 775 HSF socket installation, so I may be incorrect about how the seal may effect in taking it off.

Edit:

So in other words like my stock Intel HSF installation, I had 2 clamps that pushed down on the HS. Undoing one clamp would cause one side of the HS to be pulled up, breaking the seal, then the other would cause the other side to go up.

Ever since I switch to the Zalman 7700, its a different story. I pretty much have to twist/slide it off to break the air tight seal.

Perhaps someone who did a 775 HSF installation could elaborate their experience, on how easy it comes off?
!