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Need to forward request for a domain to another DNS server

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  • Domain
  • DNS Server
  • Windows
Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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Anonymous
February 19, 2005 12:24:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Hello there
have a domain called domain1.local that has it's own DNS server 10.0.0.1 and
there's another domain domain2.local and it's DNS server is 10.0.0.2.
What I want to do is to make 10.0.0.1 the primary DNS server for both
domains, in the following way:
10.0.0.1 holds only a NS record pointing to domain2.local without so
requests are directed to the 10.0.0.2 server when domain2.local records are
needed.
I created a zone on 10.0.0.1 called domain2.local and has only one host
record pointing to 10.0.0.2 and configured the start of authority and the
name server to point to this record (10.0.0.2).
Now when I use NSLOOKUP to ask 10.0.0.1 about records in domain2.local it
says "Non-existent domain"
Any ideas on what I am doing wrong?
Regards
Sameh

More about : forward request domain dns server

Anonymous
February 19, 2005 4:39:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:%23wK259eFFHA.3272@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
> Hello there
> have a domain called domain1.local that has it's own DNS server
> 10.0.0.1 and there's another domain domain2.local and it's DNS server
> is 10.0.0.2. What I want to do is to make 10.0.0.1 the primary DNS server
> for both
> domains, in the following way:
> 10.0.0.1 holds only a NS record pointing to domain2.local without so
> requests are directed to the 10.0.0.2 server when domain2.local
> records are needed.

To accomplish the above, if this is Windows 2003, just create a conditional
forwarder for domain2.local and provide 10.0.0.2 as the forwarder. If this
is Windows 2000, unfortunately conditional forwarding is not available.

> I created a zone on 10.0.0.1 called domain2.local and has only one
> host record pointing to 10.0.0.2 and configured the start of
> authority and the name server to point to this record (10.0.0.2).

How did you create the zone? Is it a secondary zone? If so, did the records
populate when it transferred?

> Now when I use NSLOOKUP to ask 10.0.0.1 about records in
> domain2.local it says "Non-existent domain"

That is just a message saying 10.0.0.1 does not have a PTR in the reverse
zone for that subnet. So that leads to a simpel question, do you have a
reverse zone for 10.0.0.x?? If so, create a PTR for 10.0.0.1. If not, then
create the Reverse zone, and create the PTR and that message will go away.



--?
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Windows Server - Directory Services

Security Is Like An Onion, It Has Layers
HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
A lifetime commitment for a pig.
--?
=================================
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 9:03:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

hello Ace
well, I created a primary zone.
does that mean that there is no way using Win 2000 to make a DNS server act
like an ISP DNS server?
like people have their own NS servers but the NS records of the domains on
the root servers point to the ISP servers and those in their turn point to
the right NS server when requested?
Thanks
a lot.
Regards
Sameh

"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:%23EXVK3kFFHA.2736@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> In news:%23wK259eFFHA.3272@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
>> Hello there
>> have a domain called domain1.local that has it's own DNS server
>> 10.0.0.1 and there's another domain domain2.local and it's DNS server
>> is 10.0.0.2. What I want to do is to make 10.0.0.1 the primary DNS server
>> for both
>> domains, in the following way:
>> 10.0.0.1 holds only a NS record pointing to domain2.local without so
>> requests are directed to the 10.0.0.2 server when domain2.local
>> records are needed.
>
> To accomplish the above, if this is Windows 2003, just create a
> conditional forwarder for domain2.local and provide 10.0.0.2 as the
> forwarder. If this is Windows 2000, unfortunately conditional forwarding
> is not available.
>
>> I created a zone on 10.0.0.1 called domain2.local and has only one
>> host record pointing to 10.0.0.2 and configured the start of
>> authority and the name server to point to this record (10.0.0.2).
>
> How did you create the zone? Is it a secondary zone? If so, did the
> records populate when it transferred?
>
>> Now when I use NSLOOKUP to ask 10.0.0.1 about records in
>> domain2.local it says "Non-existent domain"
>
> That is just a message saying 10.0.0.1 does not have a PTR in the reverse
> zone for that subnet. So that leads to a simpel question, do you have a
> reverse zone for 10.0.0.x?? If so, create a PTR for 10.0.0.1. If not, then
> create the Reverse zone, and create the PTR and that message will go away.
>
>
>
> --?
> Regards,
> Ace
>
> Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> so all can benefit.
>
> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> and confers no rights.
>
> Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> Microsoft Windows MVP - Windows Server - Directory Services
>
> Security Is Like An Onion, It Has Layers
> HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken;
> A lifetime commitment for a pig.
> --?
> =================================
>
Related resources
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 9:03:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:er$SIypFFHA.3648@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
> hello Ace
> well, I created a primary zone.
> does that mean that there is no way using Win 2000 to make a DNS
> server act like an ISP DNS server?
> like people have their own NS servers but the NS records of the
> domains on the root servers point to the ISP servers and those in
> their turn point to the right NS server when requested?
> Thanks
> a lot.
> Regards
> Sameh

People useWindows DNS for nameservers on the Internet all the time. I have
two of them myself. But what you are trying to do, based on your original
post, is just forward a request for a specific domain name to another DNS
server.

Isn't that what you were saying? Correct me and please elaborate if I am
wrong.

Now if you want to host a domain name on the Internet, there are mulitple
steps behind that, starting with registering your nameserver with the
Registrar. Goto www.networksolutions.com to read more info on how to do
that. The Regstrar REQUIRES a minimum of two nameservers to host any
specific domain name and their PUBLIC IP addresses. Keep in mind, if you are
behind a NAT, this may not work because NAT will only redirect an incoming
port requests to one IP. If you have two DNS behind the NAT for this, it
won;t work. You'll need two PUBLIC IPs. In this scenario, you will also need
another DNS server to host your PRIVATE IPs. You cannot mix public and
private IPs under the same domain name in DNS. It just will not work.

Ace
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 2:37:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Regarding the first registration step and the NAT issue and the public IPs,
this is already taken care of.
No private IPs are being used for that.
So the root servers when requested to anotherdomain.com point to
ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com.
What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request to
ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
www.anotherdomain.com for example.
Thank you for your time
Regards
Sameh




"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:o G5yNArFFHA.1936@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> In news:er$SIypFFHA.3648@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
>> hello Ace
>> well, I created a primary zone.
>> does that mean that there is no way using Win 2000 to make a DNS
>> server act like an ISP DNS server?
>> like people have their own NS servers but the NS records of the
>> domains on the root servers point to the ISP servers and those in
>> their turn point to the right NS server when requested?
>> Thanks
>> a lot.
>> Regards
>> Sameh
>
> People useWindows DNS for nameservers on the Internet all the time. I have
> two of them myself. But what you are trying to do, based on your original
> post, is just forward a request for a specific domain name to another DNS
> server.
>
> Isn't that what you were saying? Correct me and please elaborate if I am
> wrong.
>
> Now if you want to host a domain name on the Internet, there are mulitple
> steps behind that, starting with registering your nameserver with the
> Registrar. Goto www.networksolutions.com to read more info on how to do
> that. The Regstrar REQUIRES a minimum of two nameservers to host any
> specific domain name and their PUBLIC IP addresses. Keep in mind, if you
> are behind a NAT, this may not work because NAT will only redirect an
> incoming port requests to one IP. If you have two DNS behind the NAT for
> this, it won;t work. You'll need two PUBLIC IPs. In this scenario, you
> will also need another DNS server to host your PRIVATE IPs. You cannot mix
> public and private IPs under the same domain name in DNS. It just will not
> work.
>
> Ace
>
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 6:05:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:#MYE9ssFFHA.1836@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Regarding the first registration step and the NAT issue and the public
IPs,
> this is already taken care of.
> No private IPs are being used for that.
> So the root servers when requested to anotherdomain.com point to
> ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com.
> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
to
> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
> www.anotherdomain.com for example.

That isn't really the way that "forwarding" works.

Forwarding (to a DNS server) means that IT (that
same DNS server must go do the lookup by asking
the forwarder not by telling the "client" (which might
be even another DNS server to go there.)

On an ITERATIVE request such lookups are not
expected or done (the requesting client is saying,
tell me if you know, otherwise, tell me what you
know that will help, but if the request is already
at the same level it isn't going to go lookup again
with a different server -- clients expect that ALL
authoritative servers will give the same answer.)

Also most DNS servers are (and SHOULD BE) set
up to refuse to perform recursive requests on behalf
of (external) clients.

If you want a DIFFERENT set of servers to handle
the requests, then TELL the parent to use them (that
is, enter the correct servers with the parent.)

Whyever would you want to tell the parent the WRONG
servers?


--
Herb Martin


"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:#MYE9ssFFHA.1836@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Regarding the first registration step and the NAT issue and the public
IPs,
> this is already taken care of.
> No private IPs are being used for that.
> So the root servers when requested to anotherdomain.com point to
> ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com.
> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
to
> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
> www.anotherdomain.com for example.
> Thank you for your time
> Regards
> Sameh
>
>
>
>
> "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
> <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
> message news:o G5yNArFFHA.1936@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > In news:er$SIypFFHA.3648@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
> > Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
> >> hello Ace
> >> well, I created a primary zone.
> >> does that mean that there is no way using Win 2000 to make a DNS
> >> server act like an ISP DNS server?
> >> like people have their own NS servers but the NS records of the
> >> domains on the root servers point to the ISP servers and those in
> >> their turn point to the right NS server when requested?
> >> Thanks
> >> a lot.
> >> Regards
> >> Sameh
> >
> > People useWindows DNS for nameservers on the Internet all the time. I
have
> > two of them myself. But what you are trying to do, based on your
original
> > post, is just forward a request for a specific domain name to another
DNS
> > server.
> >
> > Isn't that what you were saying? Correct me and please elaborate if I am
> > wrong.
> >
> > Now if you want to host a domain name on the Internet, there are
mulitple
> > steps behind that, starting with registering your nameserver with the
> > Registrar. Goto www.networksolutions.com to read more info on how to do
> > that. The Regstrar REQUIRES a minimum of two nameservers to host any
> > specific domain name and their PUBLIC IP addresses. Keep in mind, if you
> > are behind a NAT, this may not work because NAT will only redirect an
> > incoming port requests to one IP. If you have two DNS behind the NAT for
> > this, it won;t work. You'll need two PUBLIC IPs. In this scenario, you
> > will also need another DNS server to host your PRIVATE IPs. You cannot
mix
> > public and private IPs under the same domain name in DNS. It just will
not
> > work.
> >
> > Ace
> >
>
>
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 2:53:27 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Not the wrong servers
simply if you want to distribute load or simply restrict access to only 1
server (or a farm) instead of several.

"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:o RdsiR5FFHA.464@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#MYE9ssFFHA.1836@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Regarding the first registration step and the NAT issue and the public
> IPs,
>> this is already taken care of.
>> No private IPs are being used for that.
>> So the root servers when requested to anotherdomain.com point to
>> ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com.
>> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
> to
>> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
>> www.anotherdomain.com for example.
>
> That isn't really the way that "forwarding" works.
>
> Forwarding (to a DNS server) means that IT (that
> same DNS server must go do the lookup by asking
> the forwarder not by telling the "client" (which might
> be even another DNS server to go there.)
>
> On an ITERATIVE request such lookups are not
> expected or done (the requesting client is saying,
> tell me if you know, otherwise, tell me what you
> know that will help, but if the request is already
> at the same level it isn't going to go lookup again
> with a different server -- clients expect that ALL
> authoritative servers will give the same answer.)
>
> Also most DNS servers are (and SHOULD BE) set
> up to refuse to perform recursive requests on behalf
> of (external) clients.
>
> If you want a DIFFERENT set of servers to handle
> the requests, then TELL the parent to use them (that
> is, enter the correct servers with the parent.)
>
> Whyever would you want to tell the parent the WRONG
> servers?
>
>
> --
> Herb Martin
>
>
> "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#MYE9ssFFHA.1836@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> Regarding the first registration step and the NAT issue and the public
> IPs,
>> this is already taken care of.
>> No private IPs are being used for that.
>> So the root servers when requested to anotherdomain.com point to
>> ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com.
>> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
> to
>> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
>> www.anotherdomain.com for example.
>> Thank you for your time
>> Regards
>> Sameh
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
>> <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
>> message news:o G5yNArFFHA.1936@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> > In news:er$SIypFFHA.3648@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
>> > Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
>> >> hello Ace
>> >> well, I created a primary zone.
>> >> does that mean that there is no way using Win 2000 to make a DNS
>> >> server act like an ISP DNS server?
>> >> like people have their own NS servers but the NS records of the
>> >> domains on the root servers point to the ISP servers and those in
>> >> their turn point to the right NS server when requested?
>> >> Thanks
>> >> a lot.
>> >> Regards
>> >> Sameh
>> >
>> > People useWindows DNS for nameservers on the Internet all the time. I
> have
>> > two of them myself. But what you are trying to do, based on your
> original
>> > post, is just forward a request for a specific domain name to another
> DNS
>> > server.
>> >
>> > Isn't that what you were saying? Correct me and please elaborate if I
>> > am
>> > wrong.
>> >
>> > Now if you want to host a domain name on the Internet, there are
> mulitple
>> > steps behind that, starting with registering your nameserver with the
>> > Registrar. Goto www.networksolutions.com to read more info on how to do
>> > that. The Regstrar REQUIRES a minimum of two nameservers to host any
>> > specific domain name and their PUBLIC IP addresses. Keep in mind, if
>> > you
>> > are behind a NAT, this may not work because NAT will only redirect an
>> > incoming port requests to one IP. If you have two DNS behind the NAT
>> > for
>> > this, it won;t work. You'll need two PUBLIC IPs. In this scenario, you
>> > will also need another DNS server to host your PRIVATE IPs. You cannot
> mix
>> > public and private IPs under the same domain name in DNS. It just will
> not
>> > work.
>> >
>> > Ace
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 2:53:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Not the wrong servers
> simply if you want to distribute load or


Register the extra servers with the parent zone.

That is the way it is properly done.

> simply restrict access to only 1
> server (or a farm) instead of several.

This is not a function of DNS.
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 11:12:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is that I
have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several AD
environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change the DNS
servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records for each
domain.
So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that would point
them to the right records.
This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.
Regards and thanks for your time.
Sameh
"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> Not the wrong servers
>> simply if you want to distribute load or
>
>
> Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
>
> That is the way it is properly done.
>
>> simply restrict access to only 1
>> server (or a farm) instead of several.
>
> This is not a function of DNS.
>
>
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 11:12:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:eCYyiDEGFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is that
I
> have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several AD
> environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change the DNS
> servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records for
each
> domain.
> So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that would
point
> them to the right records.
> This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.

Probably, due to misconfiguration (or mis-design
really) of your DNS setup.

VM's are really no different in terms of troubleshooting
such things (after the VM is working on the VNet or
whatever) than anything else.

You have to treat them like they are regular machines
to simplify the troubleshooting.

Describe your "network" and you intention and we
can work through it.

This misunderstanding frequently happens when
someone posts a question without giving the REAL
reason for the question.

We spend a lot of time explaining why the question
is mis-directed and then slowly the real question(s)
emerge....



--
Herb Martin


> Regards and thanks for your time.
> Sameh
> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> Not the wrong servers
> >> simply if you want to distribute load or
> >
> >
> > Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
> >
> > That is the way it is properly done.
> >
> >> simply restrict access to only 1
> >> server (or a farm) instead of several.
> >
> > This is not a function of DNS.
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 1:37:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Thanks
1 physical machine
192.168.0.2
2 Virtual machines
192.168.0.3 domain1.local
192.168.0.7 domain2.local

DNS server order
192.168.0.3 not a root server
192.168.0.7 not a root server
62.139.105.166 ISP Server
that's the main setup
I develop an app that runs on the physical machine that needs to connect to
Active directory on both machines in the same time.
Regards
Sameh

"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:uR3a66EGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:eCYyiDEGFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is that
> I
>> have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several AD
>> environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change the DNS
>> servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records for
> each
>> domain.
>> So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that would
> point
>> them to the right records.
>> This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.
>
> Probably, due to misconfiguration (or mis-design
> really) of your DNS setup.
>
> VM's are really no different in terms of troubleshooting
> such things (after the VM is working on the VNet or
> whatever) than anything else.
>
> You have to treat them like they are regular machines
> to simplify the troubleshooting.
>
> Describe your "network" and you intention and we
> can work through it.
>
> This misunderstanding frequently happens when
> someone posts a question without giving the REAL
> reason for the question.
>
> We spend a lot of time explaining why the question
> is mis-directed and then slowly the real question(s)
> emerge....
>
>
>
> --
> Herb Martin
>
>
>> Regards and thanks for your time.
>> Sameh
>> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
>> news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> Not the wrong servers
>> >> simply if you want to distribute load or
>> >
>> >
>> > Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
>> >
>> > That is the way it is properly done.
>> >
>> >> simply restrict access to only 1
>> >> server (or a farm) instead of several.
>> >
>> > This is not a function of DNS.
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 1:37:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:#OpD5OSGFHA.1528@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Thanks
> 1 physical machine
> 192.168.0.2
> 2 Virtual machines
> 192.168.0.3 domain1.local
> 192.168.0.7 domain2.local
>
> DNS server order
> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server
> that's the main setup
> I develop an app that runs on the physical machine that needs to connect
to
> Active directory on both machines in the same time.

Ok, so if it is two domains (each with their own
DNS server set) there are two basic ways to get
resolution:

1) Put them in a hierarchy
2) Have each DNS server (set) hold "cross
secondaries" for the other DNS zone(s)

#1 works best when you have only one tree of
zones/domains OR (in a lab etc) don't need
Internet connectivity.

#2 is a general solution -- if each set of DNS
servers can resolve the other DNS zones directly
by being a secondary for those other zones then
it just works.

--
Herb Martin


> Regards
> Sameh
>
> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> news:uR3a66EGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:eCYyiDEGFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is
that
> > I
> >> have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several AD
> >> environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change the
DNS
> >> servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records for
> > each
> >> domain.
> >> So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that would
> > point
> >> them to the right records.
> >> This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.
> >
> > Probably, due to misconfiguration (or mis-design
> > really) of your DNS setup.
> >
> > VM's are really no different in terms of troubleshooting
> > such things (after the VM is working on the VNet or
> > whatever) than anything else.
> >
> > You have to treat them like they are regular machines
> > to simplify the troubleshooting.
> >
> > Describe your "network" and you intention and we
> > can work through it.
> >
> > This misunderstanding frequently happens when
> > someone posts a question without giving the REAL
> > reason for the question.
> >
> > We spend a lot of time explaining why the question
> > is mis-directed and then slowly the real question(s)
> > emerge....
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Herb Martin
> >
> >
> >> Regards and thanks for your time.
> >> Sameh
> >> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> >> news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> >> Not the wrong servers
> >> >> simply if you want to distribute load or
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
> >> >
> >> > That is the way it is properly done.
> >> >
> >> >> simply restrict access to only 1
> >> >> server (or a farm) instead of several.
> >> >
> >> > This is not a function of DNS.
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 9:46:27 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

what do you mean by put them in a hierarchy, how do I do that?
I used the second option and it works fine
thank you for your time.
"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:ehfjlwUGFHA.2296@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#OpD5OSGFHA.1528@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>> Thanks
>> 1 physical machine
>> 192.168.0.2
>> 2 Virtual machines
>> 192.168.0.3 domain1.local
>> 192.168.0.7 domain2.local
>>
>> DNS server order
>> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
>> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
>> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server
>> that's the main setup
>> I develop an app that runs on the physical machine that needs to connect
> to
>> Active directory on both machines in the same time.
>
> Ok, so if it is two domains (each with their own
> DNS server set) there are two basic ways to get
> resolution:
>
> 1) Put them in a hierarchy
> 2) Have each DNS server (set) hold "cross
> secondaries" for the other DNS zone(s)
>
> #1 works best when you have only one tree of
> zones/domains OR (in a lab etc) don't need
> Internet connectivity.
>
> #2 is a general solution -- if each set of DNS
> servers can resolve the other DNS zones directly
> by being a secondary for those other zones then
> it just works.
>
> --
> Herb Martin
>
>
>> Regards
>> Sameh
>>
>> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
>> news:uR3a66EGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> > news:eCYyiDEGFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> >> Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is
> that
>> > I
>> >> have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several AD
>> >> environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change the
> DNS
>> >> servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records for
>> > each
>> >> domain.
>> >> So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that would
>> > point
>> >> them to the right records.
>> >> This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.
>> >
>> > Probably, due to misconfiguration (or mis-design
>> > really) of your DNS setup.
>> >
>> > VM's are really no different in terms of troubleshooting
>> > such things (after the VM is working on the VNet or
>> > whatever) than anything else.
>> >
>> > You have to treat them like they are regular machines
>> > to simplify the troubleshooting.
>> >
>> > Describe your "network" and you intention and we
>> > can work through it.
>> >
>> > This misunderstanding frequently happens when
>> > someone posts a question without giving the REAL
>> > reason for the question.
>> >
>> > We spend a lot of time explaining why the question
>> > is mis-directed and then slowly the real question(s)
>> > emerge....
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > --
>> > Herb Martin
>> >
>> >
>> >> Regards and thanks for your time.
>> >> Sameh
>> >> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> >> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> >> > news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> >> >> Not the wrong servers
>> >> >> simply if you want to distribute load or
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> > Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
>> >> >
>> >> > That is the way it is properly done.
>> >> >
>> >> >> simply restrict access to only 1
>> >> >> server (or a farm) instead of several.
>> >> >
>> >> > This is not a function of DNS.
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 23, 2005 9:46:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:eXElkKWGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> what do you mean by put them in a hierarchy, how do I do that?
> I used the second option and it works fine
> thank you for your time.

Well, they would have to BE in a hierarchy
or you would have to add the parent domain
to join them into a single hierarchy.

If you use public (Internet) names this is impracticable
since it would eliminate Internet name resolution.

In a private name space you could add the local.
zone above a.local and b.local, or even just having
a parent-child relationship, a.local and child.a.local.

But all this is something you have to plan ahead for
unless you are willing to give up general Internet
resolution.

--
Herb Martin


> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> news:ehfjlwUGFHA.2296@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:#OpD5OSGFHA.1528@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> >> Thanks
> >> 1 physical machine
> >> 192.168.0.2
> >> 2 Virtual machines
> >> 192.168.0.3 domain1.local
> >> 192.168.0.7 domain2.local
> >>
> >> DNS server order
> >> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
> >> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
> >> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server
> >> that's the main setup
> >> I develop an app that runs on the physical machine that needs to
connect
> > to
> >> Active directory on both machines in the same time.
> >
> > Ok, so if it is two domains (each with their own
> > DNS server set) there are two basic ways to get
> > resolution:
> >
> > 1) Put them in a hierarchy
> > 2) Have each DNS server (set) hold "cross
> > secondaries" for the other DNS zone(s)
> >
> > #1 works best when you have only one tree of
> > zones/domains OR (in a lab etc) don't need
> > Internet connectivity.
> >
> > #2 is a general solution -- if each set of DNS
> > servers can resolve the other DNS zones directly
> > by being a secondary for those other zones then
> > it just works.
> >
> > --
> > Herb Martin
> >
> >
> >> Regards
> >> Sameh
> >>
> >> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> >> news:uR3a66EGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> >> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> > news:eCYyiDEGFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >> >> Actually the main reason for me needing to know how that is done; is
> > that
> >> > I
> >> >> have several virtual machines running on my machine hosting several
AD
> >> >> environments, and for some reason, I need to restart or to change
the
> > DNS
> >> >> servers order back and forth to be able to resolve the SRV records
for
> >> > each
> >> >> domain.
> >> >> So I wanted to point my NIC to only one virtual DNS server, that
would
> >> > point
> >> >> them to the right records.
> >> >> This is to make is totally clear why I wanted to do that.
> >> >
> >> > Probably, due to misconfiguration (or mis-design
> >> > really) of your DNS setup.
> >> >
> >> > VM's are really no different in terms of troubleshooting
> >> > such things (after the VM is working on the VNet or
> >> > whatever) than anything else.
> >> >
> >> > You have to treat them like they are regular machines
> >> > to simplify the troubleshooting.
> >> >
> >> > Describe your "network" and you intention and we
> >> > can work through it.
> >> >
> >> > This misunderstanding frequently happens when
> >> > someone posts a question without giving the REAL
> >> > reason for the question.
> >> >
> >> > We spend a lot of time explaining why the question
> >> > is mis-directed and then slowly the real question(s)
> >> > emerge....
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > Herb Martin
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >> Regards and thanks for your time.
> >> >> Sameh
> >> >> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> >> >> news:elw0mk8FFHA.1084@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> >> > "Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> >> > news:uYoiba5FFHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> >> >> Not the wrong servers
> >> >> >> simply if you want to distribute load or
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >> > Register the extra servers with the parent zone.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > That is the way it is properly done.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >> simply restrict access to only 1
> >> >> >> server (or a farm) instead of several.
> >> >> >
> >> >> > This is not a function of DNS.
> >> >> >
> >> >> >
> >> >>
> >> >>
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
February 24, 2005 11:43:39 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:eXElkKWGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
> what do you mean by put them in a hierarchy, how do I do that?
> I used the second option and it works fine
> thank you for your time.

Sameh,

If you had Windows 2003, you can create conditional forwarders to forward
specific name requests. As for nameserver registration, the two domains you
want to forward to another is supposedly supposed to be on that server,
where the actual content of the zone is on that server, so frowarding is not
indicated, but I don;t see why it cannot be done.

So regarding the original question:

> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
> to
> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
> www.anotherdomain.com for example.

As Herb said, just make a secondary of the zone on the registered name
server and you should be good to go.

btw- Why are you pointing to an ISP's DNS server in your configuration?
Look:
> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server

That will not get you your desired results and will cause problems in
resolution. Keep your machines pointed to your own DNS and setup a forwarder
to 62.139.105.166. This configuration is an industry highly recommended
'best practice" and will eliminate possible issues. If AD was involved here,
numerous errors can result with your current config.

Ace
Anonymous
February 26, 2005 8:13:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

dear Herb and Ace
thanks a lot
I used the secondary zones setup and it just works fine.
All this is in my home network, and wanted this for tests and so on.
Thanks a lot
Regards
Sameh
"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
<PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
message news:et121ttGFHA.2936@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> In news:eXElkKWGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
> Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
>> what do you mean by put them in a hierarchy, how do I do that?
>> I used the second option and it works fine
>> thank you for your time.
>
> Sameh,
>
> If you had Windows 2003, you can create conditional forwarders to forward
> specific name requests. As for nameserver registration, the two domains
> you want to forward to another is supposedly supposed to be on that
> server, where the actual content of the zone is on that server, so
> frowarding is not indicated, but I don;t see why it cannot be done.
>
> So regarding the original question:
>
>> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward request
>> to
>> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
>> www.anotherdomain.com for example.
>
> As Herb said, just make a secondary of the zone on the registered name
> server and you should be good to go.
>
> btw- Why are you pointing to an ISP's DNS server in your configuration?
> Look:
>> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
>> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
>> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server
>
> That will not get you your desired results and will cause problems in
> resolution. Keep your machines pointed to your own DNS and setup a
> forwarder to 62.139.105.166. This configuration is an industry highly
> recommended 'best practice" and will eliminate possible issues. If AD was
> involved here, numerous errors can result with your current config.
>
> Ace
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
February 26, 2005 8:13:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uGI6FXBHFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> dear Herb and Ace
> thanks a lot
> I used the secondary zones setup and it just works fine.
> All this is in my home network, and wanted this for tests and so on.

For tests it's a bit more complicated since
they tend to "test around the edges" (odd
situations, big systems, etc.)

The key to tests is CLEAR UNDERSTANDING
of the basics so that you can solve most any
real world or straight problem and then the odd
rules for those weird questions.

--
Herb Martin


> Thanks a lot
> Regards
> Sameh
> "Ace Fekay [MVP]"
> <PleaseSubstituteMyActualFirstName&LastNameHere@hotmail.com> wrote in
> message news:et121ttGFHA.2936@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > In news:eXElkKWGFHA.3492@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
> > Sameh Ahmed <essoplus@hotmail.com> made a post then I commented below
> >> what do you mean by put them in a hierarchy, how do I do that?
> >> I used the second option and it works fine
> >> thank you for your time.
> >
> > Sameh,
> >
> > If you had Windows 2003, you can create conditional forwarders to
forward
> > specific name requests. As for nameserver registration, the two domains
> > you want to forward to another is supposedly supposed to be on that
> > server, where the actual content of the zone is on that server, so
> > frowarding is not indicated, but I don;t see why it cannot be done.
> >
> > So regarding the original question:
> >
> >> What I want, is to make ns1.domain.com and ns2.domain.com forward
request
> >> to
> >> ns1.anotherdomain.com or ns2.anotherdomain.com when asked for
> >> www.anotherdomain.com for example.
> >
> > As Herb said, just make a secondary of the zone on the registered name
> > server and you should be good to go.
> >
> > btw- Why are you pointing to an ISP's DNS server in your configuration?
> > Look:
> >> 192.168.0.3 not a root server
> >> 192.168.0.7 not a root server
> >> 62.139.105.166 ISP Server
> >
> > That will not get you your desired results and will cause problems in
> > resolution. Keep your machines pointed to your own DNS and setup a
> > forwarder to 62.139.105.166. This configuration is an industry highly
> > recommended 'best practice" and will eliminate possible issues. If AD
was
> > involved here, numerous errors can result with your current config.
> >
> > Ace
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
March 3, 2005 3:57:25 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Sameh Ahmed" <essoplus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uGI6FXBHFHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> dear Herb and Ace
> thanks a lot
> I used the secondary zones setup and it just works fine.
> All this is in my home network, and wanted this for tests and so on.
> Thanks a lot
> Regards
> Sameh

My pleasure...

Ace
!