Epson 8 tank printer at best buy.

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I saw an awesome printer today at Best Buy. It was an epson 8 tank, 13 X
19 -?? wide format. I was jealous over my current printer. but, technology
keeps leap frogging, so no need to be too jealous! Anyway, I apologize that
I did not write down the model number. I think this was it - R1800

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=7162438&type=product&productCategoryId=cat01018&id=1110265594557

Sounds like a nice unit. Anyone here have it and can comment on the pros and
cons (I know they all have cons--- no such thing as perfect) ?

Thanks in advance.
29 answers Last reply
More about epson tank printer
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Hi,
    It is the R1800 and it puts out some brilliant photos from what I've been
    able to see in the past 6 weeks I've been using it. My only gripe is the
    cost for the ink I need to feed it from Epson. However, one of the chief
    reasons for its print longevity is the pigmented inks it uses. It does some
    impressive work and as an added feature prints on CDs as well.

    --
    Jan Alter
    bearpuf@verizon.net
    or
    jalter@phila.k12.pa.us
    "Robbie" <nospamforme@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2kZze.6076$xB6.2469@trnddc03...
    >I saw an awesome printer today at Best Buy. It was an epson 8 tank, 13 X
    > 19 -?? wide format. I was jealous over my current printer. but, technology
    > keeps leap frogging, so no need to be too jealous! Anyway, I apologize
    > that
    > I did not write down the model number. I think this was it - R1800
    >
    > http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=7162438&type=product&productCategoryId=cat01018&id=1110265594557
    >
    > Sounds like a nice unit. Anyone here have it and can comment on the pros
    > and
    > cons (I know they all have cons--- no such thing as perfect) ?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:40:39 GMT, "Jan Alter" <bearpuf@verizon.net>
    wrote:

    > It is the R1800 and it puts out some brilliant photos from what I've been
    >able to see in the past 6 weeks I've been using it. My only gripe is the
    >cost for the ink I need to feed it from Epson. However, one of the chief
    >reasons for its print longevity is the pigmented inks it uses. It does some
    >impressive work and as an added feature prints on CDs as well.

    Are those ink refillable? I'll assume the printer needs to be chipped
    to use a refilled tank.

    I'm leery of epson because they are a bitch when it comes to refilling
    inks and my brother's last printer quit working properly after only
    one cart (CX5200) yet couldn't get anything done under warranty.
    --
    When you hear the toilet flush, and hear the words "uh oh", it's already
    too late. - by anonymous Mother in Austin, TX
    To reply, replace digi.mon with phreaker.net
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > I can't see much point in buying the R1800 in order to refill it. The main
    > selling point is the quality of the ink.

    I think the other selling points is the high resolution, color profile
    support, and the fact that piezo based systems are very forgiving
    regarding the medium you put through it. And with a MIS system, those
    huge external tanks, this makes one nice poorman's printshop.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan Alter)
    wrote:

    > However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    > pigmented inks it uses.

    Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with added
    pigments.

    Jon.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Jon O'Brien wrote:

    >In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan Alter)
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >>However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    >>pigmented inks it uses.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with added
    >pigments.
    >
    >Jon.
    >
    >
    DUH
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Impmon wrote:

    >On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:40:39 GMT, "Jan Alter" <bearpuf@verizon.net>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> It is the R1800 and it puts out some brilliant photos from what I've been
    >>able to see in the past 6 weeks I've been using it. My only gripe is the
    >>cost for the ink I need to feed it from Epson. However, one of the chief
    >>reasons for its print longevity is the pigmented inks it uses. It does some
    >>impressive work and as an added feature prints on CDs as well.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Are those ink refillable?
    >
    I HOPE NOT

    > I'll assume the printer needs to be chipped
    >to use a refilled tank.
    >
    >

    I HOPE SO

    WHO WANTS TO RUIN THE PERMANENT PRINTHEAD IN AN EXPENSIVE PRINTER.

    >I'm leery of epson because they are a bitch when it comes to refilling
    >inks
    >
    GOOD

    >and my brother's last printer quit working properly after only
    >one cart (CX5200) yet couldn't get anything done under warranty.
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Impmon" <impmon@digi.mon> wrote in message
    news:4v31d1tr9q8cu52ohqsnfm3bsnci5df2pa@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:40:39 GMT, "Jan Alter" <bearpuf@verizon.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It is the R1800 and it puts out some brilliant photos from what I've
    >> been
    >>able to see in the past 6 weeks I've been using it. My only gripe is the
    >>cost for the ink I need to feed it from Epson. However, one of the chief
    >>reasons for its print longevity is the pigmented inks it uses. It does
    >>some
    >>impressive work and as an added feature prints on CDs as well.
    >
    > Are those ink refillable? I'll assume the printer needs to be chipped
    > to use a refilled tank.
    >
    > I'm leery of epson because they are a bitch when it comes to refilling
    > inks and my brother's last printer quit working properly after only
    > one cart (CX5200) yet couldn't get anything done under warranty.
    > --

    I can't see much point in buying the R1800 in order to refill it. The main
    selling point is the quality of the ink.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Caitlin wrote:

    >"Impmon" <impmon@digi.mon> wrote in message
    >news:4v31d1tr9q8cu52ohqsnfm3bsnci5df2pa@4ax.com...
    >
    >
    >>On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:40:39 GMT, "Jan Alter" <bearpuf@verizon.net>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> It is the R1800 and it puts out some brilliant photos from what I've
    >>>been
    >>>able to see in the past 6 weeks I've been using it. My only gripe is the
    >>>cost for the ink I need to feed it from Epson. However, one of the chief
    >>>reasons for its print longevity is the pigmented inks it uses. It does
    >>>some
    >>>impressive work and as an added feature prints on CDs as well.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>Are those ink refillable? I'll assume the printer needs to be chipped
    >>to use a refilled tank.
    >>
    >>I'm leery of epson because they are a bitch when it comes to refilling
    >>inks and my brother's last printer quit working properly after only
    >>one cart (CX5200) yet couldn't get anything done under warranty.
    >>--
    >>
    >>
    >
    >I can't see much point in buying the R1800 in order to refill it. The main
    >selling point is the quality of the ink.
    >
    >

    HOOOORAH

    >
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Well, an ink may be dye based ink or pigmented ink. Sure you can call them
    dye ink or pigment ink. I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye based
    ink with pigment added.

    Jon O'Brien wrote:

    > In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan Alter)
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    >>pigmented inks it uses.
    >
    >
    > Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with added
    > pigments.
    >
    > Jon.
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Stevelee wrote:

    > Well, an ink may be dye based ink or pigmented ink. Sure you can call
    > them
    > dye ink or pigment ink. I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye
    > based
    > ink with pigment added.


    I LIKE IT WHEN YOU JERK OBCANOBEE OFF

    >
    > Jon O'Brien wrote:
    >
    >> In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan
    >> Alter) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    >>> pigmented inks it uses.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with
    >> added pigments.
    >>
    >> Jon.
    >
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 13:35:13 +1000, "Caitlin"
    <caitlin_online_nospam@hotmail.com> wrote:


    >
    >I can't see much point in buying the R1800 in order to refill it. The main
    >selling point is the quality of the ink.
    >
    That's true up to a point. However, when I bought my 2100 I wanted a
    CIS so I had to go elsewhere and got excellent results from Permajet.

    --

    Hecate - The Real One
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    Fashion: Buying things you don't need, with money
    you don't have, to impress people you don't like...
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <h2aAe.20$Rv7.8@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, "
    Stevelee"@hotmail.com ( Stevelee) wrote:

    > I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye based ink with pigment
    > added.

    You have now! :-)

    Jon.
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I see. Where did you get such an idea? Please don't tell me it's
    your own invention. I will keep my mind open to learn. Give me
    a pointer please.

    Jon O'Brien wrote:
    > In article <h2aAe.20$Rv7.8@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, "
    > Stevelee"@hotmail.com ( Stevelee) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye based ink with pigment
    >>added.
    >
    >
    > You have now! :-)
    >
    > Jon.
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <4bnAe.660$mN1.379@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com>, "
    Stevelee"@hotmail.com ( Stevelee) wrote:

    > I see. Where did you get such an idea? Please don't tell me it's
    > your own invention. I will keep my mind open to learn. Give me
    > a pointer please.

    We've already been over this here, a few months back. If you search
    back through the newsgroup you'll find a longish thread on the subject.

    Jon.
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    You may also wish to look at the Epson 2400 with the new K3 (three
    saturation levels of black ink) set. Both the R1800 and 2400 use pigment
    colorant inks.

    Art

    Robbie wrote:

    > I saw an awesome printer today at Best Buy. It was an epson 8 tank, 13 X
    > 19 -?? wide format. I was jealous over my current printer. but, technology
    > keeps leap frogging, so no need to be too jealous! Anyway, I apologize that
    > I did not write down the model number. I think this was it - R1800
    >
    > http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=7162438&type=product&productCategoryId=cat01018&id=1110265594557
    >
    > Sounds like a nice unit. Anyone here have it and can comment on the pros and
    > cons (I know they all have cons--- no such thing as perfect) ?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    >
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > You may also wish to look at the Epson 2400 with the new K3 (three
    > saturation levels of black ink) set. Both the R1800 and 2400 use pigment
    > colorant inks.
    >
    > Art
    >
    IIRC, there are really two saturation levels. A light black and two
    full blacks - one for gloss/semi gloss, one for matte. Replacement of
    cartridge and priming is required when changing media. A nuisance, but
    apparently not a waste of ink - as the priming doesn't expel ink.
    The R2400 apparently excels at printing B&W with no metamerism. Both
    excel printing colour.
    For gloss/semi gloss printing, the R1800 uses a gloss optimiser to even
    out the gloss level / eliminate bronzing. The R2400 does not - the new
    ink is claimed not to need it. The gloss level on very high gloss
    papers is reduced by the gloss optimiser on the R1800, and apparently
    also by the ink on the R2400.
    I don't know why, but the R1800 is a 1.5pl minimum drop size, the R2400
    3pl. I haven't seen the R2400 in action, so don't know if this makes
    any visible difference.
    The R1800 prints CDs, the R2400 does not, but has a straight through
    paper path to handle heavier media than the R1800. The R2400 is more
    expensive.
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Some inks are made by taking pigment particles and dyeing them. It's a
    hybrid ink. It is usually more stable than just dye inks, and yet the
    colors can be made more dense that way.

    The newer pigment inks make this less of a feature, since the colors
    that can be produced with just pigment has been improved considerably.

    Art

    Stevelee wrote:

    > I see. Where did you get such an idea? Please don't tell me it's
    > your own invention. I will keep my mind open to learn. Give me
    > a pointer please.
    >
    > Jon O'Brien wrote:
    >
    >> In article <h2aAe.20$Rv7.8@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, "
    >> Stevelee"@hotmail.com ( Stevelee) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye based ink with pigment
    >>> added.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> You have now! :-)
    >>
    >> Jon.
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I'm afraid your information on the 2400 is not correct.


    the 2400 is a 8 color printer, plus offering two full black options.

    The standard color set is:

    Cyan
    Light Cyan
    Magenta
    Light Magenta
    Yellow
    Black (either matte or photo)
    Light black
    Light-light black

    Or, as I stated, three black levels.

    The dense black can be exchanged between the two (matte or photo), so a
    total of 9 "color" cartridges are available. The minimum ink droplet
    size is 3.5 pl.

    I do not understand how a purge can be facilitated without having the
    ink be removed from the head. I suspect you may be confusing something.

    The whole point of the purging process is to remove the ink within the
    head channels so that the new ink source (matte or photo) is flushed
    through the head so the ink type doesn't change during the printing process.

    I would also be surprised if Epson has reintroduced separate dark black
    ink head purging pumps, which would mean all the heads are purged each
    time a change is made, but I haven't yet seen the specifics to comment
    about that aspect.

    Art

    frederick wrote:

    > Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >
    >> You may also wish to look at the Epson 2400 with the new K3 (three
    >> saturation levels of black ink) set. Both the R1800 and 2400 use
    >> pigment colorant inks.
    >>
    >> Art
    >>
    > IIRC, there are really two saturation levels. A light black and two
    > full blacks - one for gloss/semi gloss, one for matte. Replacement of
    > cartridge and priming is required when changing media. A nuisance, but
    > apparently not a waste of ink - as the priming doesn't expel ink.
    > The R2400 apparently excels at printing B&W with no metamerism. Both
    > excel printing colour.
    > For gloss/semi gloss printing, the R1800 uses a gloss optimiser to even
    > out the gloss level / eliminate bronzing. The R2400 does not - the new
    > ink is claimed not to need it. The gloss level on very high gloss
    > papers is reduced by the gloss optimiser on the R1800, and apparently
    > also by the ink on the R2400.
    > I don't know why, but the R1800 is a 1.5pl minimum drop size, the R2400
    > 3pl. I haven't seen the R2400 in action, so don't know if this makes
    > any visible difference.
    > The R1800 prints CDs, the R2400 does not, but has a straight through
    > paper path to handle heavier media than the R1800. The R2400 is more
    > expensive.
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Arthur Entlich wrote:
    > I'm afraid your information on the 2400 is not correct.
    >
    >
    > the 2400 is a 8 color printer, plus offering two full black options.
    >
    > The standard color set is:
    >
    > Cyan
    > Light Cyan
    > Magenta
    > Light Magenta
    > Yellow
    > Black (either matte or photo)
    > Light black
    > Light-light black
    >
    > Or, as I stated, three black levels.

    Ooops - quite right - my mistake.
    >
    > The dense black can be exchanged between the two (matte or photo), so a
    > total of 9 "color" cartridges are available. The minimum ink droplet
    > size is 3.5 pl.
    >
    > I do not understand how a purge can be facilitated without having the
    > ink be removed from the head. I suspect you may be confusing something.
    >
    > The whole point of the purging process is to remove the ink within the
    > head channels so that the new ink source (matte or photo) is flushed
    > through the head so the ink type doesn't change during the printing
    > process.
    >
    > I would also be surprised if Epson has reintroduced separate dark black
    > ink head purging pumps, which would mean all the heads are purged each
    > time a change is made, but I haven't yet seen the specifics to comment
    > about that aspect.
    >

    Photo-i review seemed to think so, but that was speculation.
    I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is empty?
    A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is replaced.

    > Art
    >
    > frederick wrote:
    >
    >> Arthur Entlich wrote:
    >>
    >>> You may also wish to look at the Epson 2400 with the new K3 (three
    >>> saturation levels of black ink) set. Both the R1800 and 2400 use
    >>> pigment colorant inks.
    >>>
    >>> Art
    >>>
    >> IIRC, there are really two saturation levels. A light black and two
    >> full blacks - one for gloss/semi gloss, one for matte. Replacement of
    >> cartridge and priming is required when changing media. A nuisance,
    >> but apparently not a waste of ink - as the priming doesn't expel ink.
    >> The R2400 apparently excels at printing B&W with no metamerism. Both
    >> excel printing colour.
    >> For gloss/semi gloss printing, the R1800 uses a gloss optimiser to
    >> even out the gloss level / eliminate bronzing. The R2400 does not -
    >> the new ink is claimed not to need it. The gloss level on very high
    >> gloss papers is reduced by the gloss optimiser on the R1800, and
    >> apparently also by the ink on the R2400.
    >> I don't know why, but the R1800 is a 1.5pl minimum drop size, the
    >> R2400 3pl. I haven't seen the R2400 in action, so don't know if this
    >> makes any visible difference.
    >> The R1800 prints CDs, the R2400 does not, but has a straight through
    >> paper path to handle heavier media than the R1800. The R2400 is more
    >> expensive.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    frederick wrote:
    ..
    > I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    > better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is empty?
    > A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is replaced.
    >

    I having a R210 my first Epson with separate cartridges now do changes
    if the printer stops, as well change the almost empty.

    If I don't, the purge will empty them hence the original changed
    cartridge gets an extra purge upon the next change - what a waste of ink.

    rm
  21. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    frederick wrote:

    >
    > Photo-i review seemed to think so, but that was speculation.
    > I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    > better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is empty?
    > A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is replaced.
    >
    >> Art
    >>
    >>


    You raise a good question, and the answer isn't that easy to determine.

    With all Epson single color cartridge printers (other than the large
    carriage that use the very large stationary cartridges), the printer
    goes through a purge cycle each time a new cartridge is installed, and
    all the cartridges/heads are purged equally, since only one purge pump
    is engineered into these models.

    So the question is does one use more ink replacing cartridges one by one
    and having all the other cartridges go through multiple purging, or what?

    I don't know the amount of ink that is purged from each cartridge during
    an exchange, but multiplied by 6-7 or 8 colors, it could add up pretty fast.

    Art
  22. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Rob wrote:

    > frederick wrote:
    > .
    >
    >> I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    >> better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is empty?
    >> A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is replaced.
    >>
    >
    > I having a R210 my first Epson with separate cartridges now do changes
    > if the printer stops, as well change the almost empty.
    >
    > If I don't, the purge will empty them hence the original changed
    > cartridge gets an extra purge upon the next change - what a waste of ink.
    >
    > rm

    Yes - a darned nuisance waste of ink. With the R1800, the gloss
    optimiser, photo cyan, photo magenta, and yellow ink get used at about
    double the rate of the others when printing photos. No doubt that
    varies with what the photos are. It looks to me like it could be a good
    idea to replace all four at the same time, all eight next time.
  23. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    frederick wrote:
    > Rob wrote:
    >
    >> frederick wrote:
    >> .
    >>
    >>> I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    >>> better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is empty?
    >>> A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is
    >>> replaced.
    >>>
    >>
    >> I having a R210 my first Epson with separate cartridges now do changes
    >> if the printer stops, as well change the almost empty.
    >>
    >> If I don't, the purge will empty them hence the original changed
    >> cartridge gets an extra purge upon the next change - what a waste of ink.
    >>
    >> rm
    >
    >
    > Yes - a darned nuisance waste of ink. With the R1800, the gloss
    > optimiser, photo cyan, photo magenta, and yellow ink get used at about
    > double the rate of the others when printing photos. No doubt that
    > varies with what the photos are. It looks to me like it could be a good
    > idea to replace all four at the same time, all eight next time.

    I've just started with the R1800 testing for a consistent profile, and
    making some prints, the levels, (not having printed any normal pages)
    are at :95% yellow, 90% Magenta, 80% cyan, 85% Photo black all the
    remainder show full. I have the gloss set on automatic.

    This is a different pattern of usage to either the R210 or 1270 and what
    you are seeing.

    rm
  24. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Rob wrote:
    > frederick wrote:
    >
    >> Rob wrote:
    >>
    >>> frederick wrote:
    >>> .
    >>>
    >>>> I am a bit mystified by cartridge changes on these printers. Is it
    >>>> better to just replace all cartridges below about 20% when one is
    >>>> empty?
    >>>> A lot of ink seems to be purged from all cartridges when one is
    >>>> replaced.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I having a R210 my first Epson with separate cartridges now do
    >>> changes if the printer stops, as well change the almost empty.
    >>>
    >>> If I don't, the purge will empty them hence the original changed
    >>> cartridge gets an extra purge upon the next change - what a waste of
    >>> ink.
    >>>
    >>> rm
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Yes - a darned nuisance waste of ink. With the R1800, the gloss
    >> optimiser, photo cyan, photo magenta, and yellow ink get used at about
    >> double the rate of the others when printing photos. No doubt that
    >> varies with what the photos are. It looks to me like it could be a
    >> good idea to replace all four at the same time, all eight next time.
    >
    >
    > I've just started with the R1800 testing for a consistent profile, and
    > making some prints, the levels, (not having printed any normal pages)
    > are at :95% yellow, 90% Magenta, 80% cyan, 85% Photo black all the
    > remainder show full. I have the gloss set on automatic.
    >
    > This is a different pattern of usage to either the R210 or 1270 and what
    > you are seeing.
    >
    > rm

    Not too far off what I've seen. Certainly Cyan is the first to go.
    Are you profiling different (non-epson) papers?
    I have fiddled with some Lyson papers, some of which were nice (their
    "pro satin", some of which (their "darkroom" series) were pretty
    horrible IMO. Tetanal Archival Matte is very nice - I have just used
    the epson profile, which is close enough to perfect for me. I note that
    Epson's Matte Heavyweight is supposed to be terrible, but as a cheap and
    brilliant white card, I don't find it too bad. Maybe I'm not fussy enough.
    I agree with the Photo-i review that suggested more sharpening be
    applied to images before printing than looks good on screen.
    Unsharpened DSLR images are just so smooth that they don't look like
    what most people consider "normal" for a photo. All the detail may be
    there, but it doesn't stand out.
    I haven't seen a need to increase yellow - seems fine to me with
    everything at default.
  25. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > Are you profiling different (non-epson) papers?

    Ilford papers seem the most consistent at good value here.

    Epson papers are about 50% more expensive than Ilford paper. I have
    downloaded the Ilford profiles and using them as a starting point.
    Haven't tried the Lyson papers as I've never found who stocks them. We
    get bombarded with Chinese and Japanese inks and papers. One that i have
    used in 6x4 is a Japanese - can't tell what its about as its all in
    Japanese writing - better than the epson gloss. This is 1/4 the price of
    Epson. The retailer says its made by Fuji. All I can read is the part
    number SG-S/KO1235/4R INKJET Paper Made in Japan, makes cleaner prints
    that Epson paper the base is much whiter.

    I've just ordered up some roll paper to output some panoramic prints
    that can be sold now that I have something with better ink permanency.

    I have some older Tetenal paper, unused, which has now gone yellow
    around the edges, so I don't think Ill use that stuff again. This was
    kept in its original packing.

    rm


    > I have fiddled with some Lyson papers, some of which were nice (their
    > "pro satin", some of which (their "darkroom" series) were pretty
    > horrible IMO. Tetanal Archival Matte is very nice - I have just used
    > the epson profile, which is close enough to perfect for me. I note that
    > Epson's Matte Heavyweight is supposed to be terrible, but as a cheap and
    > brilliant white card, I don't find it too bad. Maybe I'm not fussy enough.
    > I agree with the Photo-i review that suggested more sharpening be
    > applied to images before printing than looks good on screen.
    > Unsharpened DSLR images are just so smooth that they don't look like
    > what most people consider "normal" for a photo. All the detail may be
    > there, but it doesn't stand out.
    > I haven't seen a need to increase yellow - seems fine to me with
    > everything at default.
  26. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Actually, Stevelee, Jon is correct.

    Dye colorant
    Pigment colorant

    or

    dyed pigment or pigmented ink, which is ink that contains dyed pigments.
    They are sometimes also called hybrid inks.

    I have been known to make the error myself, and Jon is always there to
    correct me... it may be annoying ;-) but his is correct for the sake of
    accuracy.

    Art


    Stevelee wrote:

    > Well, an ink may be dye based ink or pigmented ink. Sure you can call them
    > dye ink or pigment ink. I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye based
    > ink with pigment added.
    >
    > Jon O'Brien wrote:
    >
    >> In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan
    >> Alter) wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    >>> pigmented inks it uses.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with
    >> added pigments.
    >>
    >> Jon.
  27. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I want to apologize for resurrecting an old thread accidentally.

    My router failed and I have substituted a borrowed unit, which required
    a different news server name, and it caused all the postings to show up
    as "current and unread" and I answered one or two old ones accidentally.

    I will now try to return to current (or nearso) time without disturbing
    the time line any further.

    PS: Speaking of timelines and time machines... don't bother seeing the
    movie "A Sound of Thunder" which just came out today. I saw it in
    preview, and it's laughably bad, and an insult to Ray Bradbury's ghost.

    Art

    Arthur Entlich wrote:

    > Actually, Stevelee, Jon is correct.
    >
    > Dye colorant
    > Pigment colorant
    >
    > or
    >
    > dyed pigment or pigmented ink, which is ink that contains dyed pigments.
    > They are sometimes also called hybrid inks.
    >
    > I have been known to make the error myself, and Jon is always there to
    > correct me... it may be annoying ;-) but his is correct for the sake of
    > accuracy.
    >
    > Art
    >
    >
    > Stevelee wrote:
    >
    >> Well, an ink may be dye based ink or pigmented ink. Sure you can call
    >> them
    >> dye ink or pigment ink. I have never heard of pigmented ink being dye
    >> based
    >> ink with pigment added.
    >>
    >> Jon O'Brien wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <r0%ze.2358$rC4.2352@trndny03>, bearpuf@verizon.net (Jan
    >>> Alter) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> However, one of the chief reasons for its print longevity is the
    >>>> pigmented inks it uses.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Pigment, not pigmented. The latter means it's a dye-based ink with
    >>> added pigments.
    >>>
    >>> Jon.
  28. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <aN6Se.361276$s54.159076@pd7tw2no>, e-printerhelp@mvps.org
    (Arthur Entlich) wrote:

    > PS: Speaking of timelines and time machines... don't bother seeing the
    > movie "A Sound of Thunder" which just came out today. I saw it in
    > preview, and it's laughably bad, and an insult to Ray Bradbury's ghost.

    Thanks for that, Arthur, even though it's sad news.

    I've been a fan of Ray Bradbury's wonderful writing for 40 years or so and
    was hoping that the film might do the short story justice, but feared that
    it wouldn't.

    I keep hoping that a sympathetic director will take on 'Dandelion Wine',
    my favourite Bradbury novel and possibly the hardest to do justice to, but
    I suspect it would never get a budget as it's too 'small' a story for
    Hollywood.

    Jon.
  29. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    In article <UG6Se.361264$s54.143239@pd7tw2no>, e-printerhelp@mvps.org
    (Arthur Entlich) wrote:

    > I have been known to make the error myself, and Jon is always there to
    > correct me...

    I really should get a new hobby horse. ;-)

    Jon.
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