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Windows 7 64 bit freeze! help

Last response: in Windows 7
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May 20, 2011 7:08:49 AM

Following a failure of my previous (Gigabyte) motherboard I decided to uprate my computer to a Gigabyte GA-X58a-UD5 motherboard and to load the 64 bit version of Windows 7.

Since doing this the computer has been intermittently freezing which is rather frustrating since it requires a reboot.

The default BIOS setting for the memory 'Performance Enhance' was 'Turbo' and so I reset this to 'Standard' which gave some improvement but the system still freezes at least a couple of times a day. The memory is Kingston DDR3 (6GB) operating at 1066 MHz.

Any suggestions?

Thanks
Roger Evans

More about : windows bit freeze

a c 228 $ Windows 7
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May 20, 2011 12:06:03 PM

Did you do a clean install of the OS when you moved the drive to the new board? If not, that is most likely the reason. You might be able to get away with a repair install, but a clean install is recommended. Also, you need to update the chipset drivers.
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May 27, 2011 1:00:05 AM

Hawkeye22 said:
Did you do a clean install of the OS when you moved the drive to the new board? If not, that is most likely the reason. You might be able to get away with a repair install, but a clean install is recommended. Also, you need to update the chipset drivers.


Thanks for the reply Hawkeye but I did do a clean install of Win 7 64 bit. I had previously been using the 32 bit version which had been upgraded from Vista. I didn't want to reload an older operating system and then uprate it (as the Win 7 copy I had was an upgrade version) and so purchased a new copy of Win 7 and loaded it from scratch. I also put in new HDDs and am using RAID 0 for the operating system and system software. This meant that the 64 bit operating system and all the software was loaded as clean copies.

The first thing I did once the system was loaded was to install all the updates including the chipset drivers.

I have also run a registry cleaner (Registry Reviver) to make sure that the registry was clean and every indication I can get from the computer (eg System health report etc) indicates that everything is good.

Since posting the original query I have turned on XMP Profile1 in the BIOS (the 3 x 2GB Kingston memory I have supports it) and this has made a slight improvement. In fact it is not the whole operating system that freezes now but often the Task manager will freeze as soon as it is loaded - after a few minutes, starts operating. Other programmes such as Google Chrome keep operating while this is happening.

The freezing is not a frequent occurrence but a damn nuisance.
Roger


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May 27, 2011 8:02:51 AM

Hi,

Sometimes your system might lack sufficient hard disk space which then results in frequent system freezes. In most of such cases, cookies, temp files and folders occupy a lot of the memory space on your system. In such cases, you must use Disk Cleanup to delete such unwanted files and data from your system and free up the disk space. This will not just remove unwanted information from your hard disk, but will also allow you to compress your Recycle Bin and old files.

for more information and help....................
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprogeneral/thread/a82a7321-a75e-408b-9458-e4549bbb6fd4/#cb36bb28-cc7c-412c-82b5-7a55f054fc30 hope this helps you.
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May 27, 2011 1:34:02 PM

Freezing of your operating system can be associated with bad ram. If you can get into windows try installing memtest (Free) and run it to diagnose your ram, if you can't even get into windows, try removing all your ram, and leave one stick in and try booting up. If you can load into windows, insert another stick in and try loading again. Do this until you find the bad stick.
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May 27, 2011 9:27:41 PM

smoothdude said:
Freezing of your operating system can be associated with bad ram. If you can get into windows try installing memtest (Free) and run it to diagnose your ram, if you can't even get into windows, try removing all your ram, and leave one stick in and try booting up. If you can load into windows, insert another stick in and try loading again. Do this until you find the bad stick.


Thanks to both Ricky_Critic and smoothdude for your comments. With regard to hard disk space my computer has plenty - 1.5 TB with 3 partitions with plenty of free space.

smoothdude's comments on the RAM might have been closer to the mark and, as I indicated previously, when I enabled Extreme Memory Processing (XMP) profile1 in the BIOS the freezing seemed to reduce. The other interesting thing was that after I enabled XMP and ran the 'Windows Experience Index' the memory score index increased from 7.5 to 7.6

The problem might have been solved by installing the latest driver for the ATI Radeon HD5700 video card yesterday. The computer hasn't had a problem in the last 24 hours.

Thanks for you help
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