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Change DNS Network IP

Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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March 22, 2005 7:32:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Is there any way to easily change my DNS IP network. My current IP address
is 192.168.1.XXX/24 and would like to change it to 10.10.1.###/24

Thanks R

More about : change dns network

Anonymous
March 23, 2005 12:58:00 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

If you're using DHCP this isn't too painful. You setup a superscope, and
then disable the old range.

Obviously, you have to reconfigure the servers. The DCs are particularly
important -this is one of the main ways to create the DNS island problem.

Have a look at this article for info. on changing a DCs IP address:
-- http://www.msresource.net/content/view/22/47/


Obviously you need to change the sites and subnets, and have to cleanup DNS
and WINS if necessary.


--

Paul Williams

http://www.msresource.net/
http://forums.msresource.net/
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 12:58:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"ptwilliams" <ptw2001@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o OeyymyLFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> If you're using DHCP this isn't too painful. You setup a superscope, and
> then disable the old range.
>
> Obviously, you have to reconfigure the servers. The DCs are particularly
> important -this is one of the main ways to create the DNS island problem.

You might also wish to setup routing between
the old an new address ranges so that as machines
transfer, they will still be able to reach their servers
and peers.

Routers for instance might be given an address on
each network until all machines have transitioned.

The same MIGHT make sense for servers but can
probably be handled by the routers more easily AND
more reliably.

> Have a look at this article for info. on changing a DCs IP address:
> -- http://www.msresource.net/content/view/22/47/
>
>
> Obviously you need to change the sites and subnets, and have to cleanup
DNS
> and WINS if necessary.
>
>
> --
>
> Paul Williams
>
> http://www.msresource.net/
> http://forums.msresource.net/
>
>
Related resources
March 23, 2005 12:58:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

The DHCP and all the leases there are easy. I was hoping I would not have to
go through all the entire DNS. Almost like a search and replace. It will be
only the 1st three octets being changed globally. Small network.



"Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
news:u60i1O0LFHA.3960@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> "ptwilliams" <ptw2001@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:o OeyymyLFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> If you're using DHCP this isn't too painful. You setup a superscope, and
>> then disable the old range.
>>
>> Obviously, you have to reconfigure the servers. The DCs are particularly
>> important -this is one of the main ways to create the DNS island problem.
>
> You might also wish to setup routing between
> the old an new address ranges so that as machines
> transfer, they will still be able to reach their servers
> and peers.
>
> Routers for instance might be given an address on
> each network until all machines have transitioned.
>
> The same MIGHT make sense for servers but can
> probably be handled by the routers more easily AND
> more reliably.
>
>> Have a look at this article for info. on changing a DCs IP address:
>> -- http://www.msresource.net/content/view/22/47/
>>
>>
>> Obviously you need to change the sites and subnets, and have to cleanup
> DNS
>> and WINS if necessary.
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Paul Williams
>>
>> http://www.msresource.net/
>> http://forums.msresource.net/
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 3:40:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

If it were a LOT of addresses or zones, then
I would drop them to standard Primaries, kept
in the file system, and run a Perl script through
them before loading them back up and changing
back to AD-Integrated.

That is what I have done in the past.

There is a point where changing the zone type
and writing a quick script is easier than using
the GUI.

BTW, this is one of the main reasons that zone
files use the "@" sign to reflect the "last record
name" -- so that multiple zones files can be built
to look very similar when they all point to the same
set of addresses (such as with many multi-site web
and FTP servers.)

--
Herb Martin


"Bob" <b@B.b> wrote in message news:7w30e.75991$755.41293@lakeread05...
> The DHCP and all the leases there are easy. I was hoping I would not have
to
> go through all the entire DNS. Almost like a search and replace. It will
be
> only the 1st three octets being changed globally. Small network.
>
>
>
> "Herb Martin" <news@LearnQuick.com> wrote in message
> news:u60i1O0LFHA.3960@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > "ptwilliams" <ptw2001@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:o OeyymyLFHA.3076@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> >> If you're using DHCP this isn't too painful. You setup a superscope,
and
> >> then disable the old range.
> >>
> >> Obviously, you have to reconfigure the servers. The DCs are
particularly
> >> important -this is one of the main ways to create the DNS island
problem.
> >
> > You might also wish to setup routing between
> > the old an new address ranges so that as machines
> > transfer, they will still be able to reach their servers
> > and peers.
> >
> > Routers for instance might be given an address on
> > each network until all machines have transitioned.
> >
> > The same MIGHT make sense for servers but can
> > probably be handled by the routers more easily AND
> > more reliably.
> >
> >> Have a look at this article for info. on changing a DCs IP address:
> >> -- http://www.msresource.net/content/view/22/47/
> >>
> >>
> >> Obviously you need to change the sites and subnets, and have to cleanup
> > DNS
> >> and WINS if necessary.
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >>
> >> Paul Williams
> >>
> >> http://www.msresource.net/
> >> http://forums.msresource.net/
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
March 23, 2005 2:26:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:y900e.75590$755.32854@lakeread05,
Bob <b@B.b> commented
Then Kevin replied below:
> Is there any way to easily change my DNS IP network. My
> current IP address is 192.168.1.XXX/24 and would like to
> change it to 10.10.1.###/24
>
> Thanks R

Not easy, but you can reduce the pain by first adding the new IP addresses
to the DNS servers (Make sure DNS is listening on the new address) and DCs
if this is an AD environment. Set the DC to use all four addresses in TCP/IP
properties.
Then run Netdiag /fix then run netdiag /test:D ns /v to make sure the new
addresses are registered in DNS.

Then it is just a matter of getting the new address scheme out to the
clients, after which time you can remove the old addresses from the DC and
run the netdiag commands again.

Otherwise if you just change the addresses on the DCs, your Network is down
until you have changed the clients. This makes it where you can change the
address on the fly fairly easily.

--
Best regards,
Kevin D4 Dad Goodknecht Sr. [MVP]
Hope This Helps
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