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How to remove PC's from Domain

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May 21, 2005 9:06:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Hello,

I hope I can explain this well.

I need to reformat my server which is a domain controller and I have a few
XP boxes I want to be able to log into after I reformat the Server.

How can I get the pc's to return to a state that they were before I joined
them to the domain.

I don't want to have to reformat the XP boxes too? Way too many apps on them.

Please help
Thank you
Joe

More about : remove domain

Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:42:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Joe" <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:1D4F3E28-930B-4FD9-9A8F-B5835AC29941@microsoft.com...
> Hello,
>
> I hope I can explain this well.
>
> I need to reformat my server which is a domain controller and I have a few
> XP boxes I want to be able to log into after I reformat the Server.

If this is you only DC then you will lose your Domain unless
you have a backup and later restore it (System State backup.)

Most people who THINK they need to reformat their DC really
don't.

What is your real goal? Maybe we can help with that...

> How can I get the pc's to return to a state that they were before I
joined
> them to the domain.

You will need either another DC (another server you can promote before
destroying this one) OR you will need to backup/restore System State OR
you will need to find another way to reach your real goal (instead of doing
the format) OR you will have to recreate all of the user and computer
accounts after reformatting and creating a NEW domain.

> I don't want to have to reformat the XP boxes too? Way too many apps on
them.

That would not be the case anyway. The machines can join
a new domain without being reformatted -- so even if you
(choose) to destroy the last DC and thus the domain, you
can still join them to the "new" domain.

Unless you have a deep seated virus the reformat is seldom the
best option.

If you have that, you may not even be able to trust any new DC
you promote NOR the current machines (since the virus could
be the current Admin of your domain!)

--
Herb Martin, MCSE, MVP
Accelerated MCSE
http://www.LearnQuick.Com
[phone number on web site]
May 22, 2005 4:42:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Hello Herb,
Thank you for your reply,

Yes this is my only domain and I had terrible problems with it.
I have reformatted it already and I am just about done. However I got into
this situation from SP1.

Thank you
Joe

"Herb Martin" wrote:

> "Joe" <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:1D4F3E28-930B-4FD9-9A8F-B5835AC29941@microsoft.com...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I hope I can explain this well.
> >
> > I need to reformat my server which is a domain controller and I have a few
> > XP boxes I want to be able to log into after I reformat the Server.
>
> If this is you only DC then you will lose your Domain unless
> you have a backup and later restore it (System State backup.)
>
> Most people who THINK they need to reformat their DC really
> don't.
>
> What is your real goal? Maybe we can help with that...
>
> > How can I get the pc's to return to a state that they were before I
> joined
> > them to the domain.
>
> You will need either another DC (another server you can promote before
> destroying this one) OR you will need to backup/restore System State OR
> you will need to find another way to reach your real goal (instead of doing
> the format) OR you will have to recreate all of the user and computer
> accounts after reformatting and creating a NEW domain.
>
> > I don't want to have to reformat the XP boxes too? Way too many apps on
> them.
>
> That would not be the case anyway. The machines can join
> a new domain without being reformatted -- so even if you
> (choose) to destroy the last DC and thus the domain, you
> can still join them to the "new" domain.
>
> Unless you have a deep seated virus the reformat is seldom the
> best option.
>
> If you have that, you may not even be able to trust any new DC
> you promote NOR the current machines (since the virus could
> be the current Admin of your domain!)
>
> --
> Herb Martin, MCSE, MVP
> Accelerated MCSE
> http://www.LearnQuick.Com
> [phone number on web site]
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 3:28:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

"Joe" <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:5ACD8672-1A41-40E8-8EE2-4F6CA193E1E4@microsoft.com...
> Hello Herb,
> Thank you for your reply,
>
> Yes this is my only domain and I had terrible problems with it.

Domain CONTROLLER?

> I have reformatted it already and I am just about done. However I got into
> this situation from SP1.

SP1 of Win2000? That is pretty much worthless these days.

You really need SP4+ on it.

Also note, before 'reformatting' a DC (or most any Windows
machine) it is almost always worth doing a "Repair Install".

Even if that fails, the disk doesn't need reformatting, just
re-install if you give up on the OS.

There isn't much any other way to say this, but it sounds like
you are flailing around which is fairly common when someone
does understand the actual problem or doesn't know the repair
or troubleshooting options.

We are happy to help you here (and elsewhere) but we really
need the precise symptoms, sometimes even the actual words
on the error message.

--
Herb Martin, MCSE, MVP
Accelerated MCSE
http://www.LearnQuick.Com
[phone number on web site]

>
> Thank you
> Joe
>
> "Herb Martin" wrote:
>
> > "Joe" <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:1D4F3E28-930B-4FD9-9A8F-B5835AC29941@microsoft.com...
> > > Hello,
> > >
> > > I hope I can explain this well.
> > >
> > > I need to reformat my server which is a domain controller and I have a
few
> > > XP boxes I want to be able to log into after I reformat the Server.
> >
> > If this is you only DC then you will lose your Domain unless
> > you have a backup and later restore it (System State backup.)
> >
> > Most people who THINK they need to reformat their DC really
> > don't.
> >
> > What is your real goal? Maybe we can help with that...
> >
> > > How can I get the pc's to return to a state that they were before I
> > joined
> > > them to the domain.
> >
> > You will need either another DC (another server you can promote before
> > destroying this one) OR you will need to backup/restore System State OR
> > you will need to find another way to reach your real goal (instead of
doing
> > the format) OR you will have to recreate all of the user and computer
> > accounts after reformatting and creating a NEW domain.
> >
> > > I don't want to have to reformat the XP boxes too? Way too many apps
on
> > them.
> >
> > That would not be the case anyway. The machines can join
> > a new domain without being reformatted -- so even if you
> > (choose) to destroy the last DC and thus the domain, you
> > can still join them to the "new" domain.
> >
> > Unless you have a deep seated virus the reformat is seldom the
> > best option.
> >
> > If you have that, you may not even be able to trust any new DC
> > you promote NOR the current machines (since the virus could
> > be the current Admin of your domain!)
> >
> > --
> > Herb Martin, MCSE, MVP
> > Accelerated MCSE
> > http://www.LearnQuick.Com
> > [phone number on web site]
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 7:40:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

On Sat, 21 May 2005 17:06:02 -0700, Joe
<Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I need to reformat my server which is a domain controller and I have a few
>XP boxes I want to be able to log into after I reformat the Server.

Make sure you have a local account on the system and you know the
password. Preferably the Administrator account. Log into the local
system and not the domain.

> How can I get the pc's to return to a state that they were before I joined
>them to the domain.

You may not be able to. But you can remove them from the domain.
Control Panel -> System -> Computer Name tab -> Change button. Change
them to a workgroup, when you have a new DC do the same only join the
domain.

>I don't want to have to reformat the XP boxes too? Way too many apps on them.

You don't need to remove them from the domain to accomplish this.

Jeff
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 3:43:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

>Jeff, Thanks I do appreciate the help here I have made notes on this from
>you and I did remove the PC's that way but I couldn't keep the settings as
>you indicated.
>I had a long long night with servers and PC reformating.

Couldn't keep *what* settings? The user profile will be different
when you're outside the domain, but you can copy the profile from the
local copy to the new profile you're using when you're removed from
the domain. There is (was) no need to reformat a PC in this case.

Jeff
May 24, 2005 12:39:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Well I guess I Screwed up.
I will add this to my notes.

I was reffering to the frofile when I said settings

thank you
Joe

"Jeff Cochran" wrote:

> >Jeff, Thanks I do appreciate the help here I have made notes on this from
> >you and I did remove the PC's that way but I couldn't keep the settings as
> >you indicated.
> >I had a long long night with servers and PC reformating.
>
> Couldn't keep *what* settings? The user profile will be different
> when you're outside the domain, but you can copy the profile from the
> local copy to the new profile you're using when you're removed from
> the domain. There is (was) no need to reformat a PC in this case.
>
> Jeff
>
Anonymous
May 25, 2005 3:03:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

On Mon, 23 May 2005 20:39:07 -0700, Joe
<Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>Well I guess I Screwed up.
>I will add this to my notes.

If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 

>I was reffering to the frofile when I said settings

I looked, but I don't have a decent link to dealing with user
profiles. Might want to ask in a networking or Windows admin group.
There are quite a few things that can be done to manage a user's local
and roaming profiles, depending on your environment, and keeping a
user's settings is a common issue. Think about when a system is old
and being replaced, not just when you have a domain issue like this.

Jeff



>thank you
>Joe
>
>"Jeff Cochran" wrote:
>
>> >Jeff, Thanks I do appreciate the help here I have made notes on this from
>> >you and I did remove the PC's that way but I couldn't keep the settings as
>> >you indicated.
>> >I had a long long night with servers and PC reformating.
>>
>> Couldn't keep *what* settings? The user profile will be different
>> when you're outside the domain, but you can copy the profile from the
>> local copy to the new profile you're using when you're removed from
>> the domain. There is (was) no need to reformat a PC in this case.
>>
>> Jeff
>>
May 25, 2005 3:03:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 

You are so right!

Thank you for the help I am going to look for the Profile issue.
Thank you for looking =+)

"Jeff Cochran" wrote:

> On Mon, 23 May 2005 20:39:07 -0700, Joe
> <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
>
> >Well I guess I Screwed up.
> >I will add this to my notes.
>
> If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 
>
> >I was reffering to the frofile when I said settings
>
> I looked, but I don't have a decent link to dealing with user
> profiles. Might want to ask in a networking or Windows admin group.
> There are quite a few things that can be done to manage a user's local
> and roaming profiles, depending on your environment, and keeping a
> user's settings is a common issue. Think about when a system is old
> and being replaced, not just when you have a domain issue like this.
>
> Jeff
>
>
>
> >thank you
> >Joe
> >
> >"Jeff Cochran" wrote:
> >
> >> >Jeff, Thanks I do appreciate the help here I have made notes on this from
> >> >you and I did remove the PC's that way but I couldn't keep the settings as
> >> >you indicated.
> >> >I had a long long night with servers and PC reformating.
> >>
> >> Couldn't keep *what* settings? The user profile will be different
> >> when you're outside the domain, but you can copy the profile from the
> >> local copy to the new profile you're using when you're removed from
> >> the domain. There is (was) no need to reformat a PC in this case.
> >>
> >> Jeff
> >>
>
>
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 3:56:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Joe wrote:
> If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 
>
> You are so right!
>
> Thank you for the help I am going to look for the Profile issue.
> Thank you for looking =+)
>

Not sure if Joe will check back, but as for recovering the DC, Herb's
suggestion to restore the system state from a backup on the new rebuild will
bring the DC back up without losing anything, this way the profiles won't be
toasted.

Also, as for the 1030 and 1058 errors, I had a similar prob at a client's
site. After messing around and testing it, I've found that on Win2000 PCs,
the computer account can be anywhere in the domain for a user's GPO to work,
but found out XP Pro PCs need to have the computer account in the same OU or
under it for the user GPOs to work. Don't know why, but when we moved the
PCs into the user's OU (or in a child of it), the GPOs ran and the errors
disappeared.

FYI: I was using GPMC to troubleshoot, specifically RSOP and the Modeling
wizards and reports, as well as the Event logs within it. Nice tool!

--
Regards,
Ace

Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
so all can benefit.

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
and confers no rights.

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft Windows MVP - Windows Server - Directory Services

Paramount: What's up with taking Enterprise off the air??
Infinite Diversities in Infinite Combinations.
=================================
May 31, 2005 6:12:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Ace this is awesome!

Thank you I have printed this for my notes.

I have to ask please if I could. What is the OU? I saw this before but was
unable to find out what the acronym was.

I have never used system state either any direction on this?
I wouldn't mind learning a little more here so I can refer to this later.

Thank you again
Joe

"Ace Fekay [MVP]" wrote:

> Joe wrote:
> > If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 
> >
> > You are so right!
> >
> > Thank you for the help I am going to look for the Profile issue.
> > Thank you for looking =+)
> >
>
> Not sure if Joe will check back, but as for recovering the DC, Herb's
> suggestion to restore the system state from a backup on the new rebuild will
> bring the DC back up without losing anything, this way the profiles won't be
> toasted.
>
> Also, as for the 1030 and 1058 errors, I had a similar prob at a client's
> site. After messing around and testing it, I've found that on Win2000 PCs,
> the computer account can be anywhere in the domain for a user's GPO to work,
> but found out XP Pro PCs need to have the computer account in the same OU or
> under it for the user GPOs to work. Don't know why, but when we moved the
> PCs into the user's OU (or in a child of it), the GPOs ran and the errors
> disappeared.
>
> FYI: I was using GPMC to troubleshoot, specifically RSOP and the Modeling
> wizards and reports, as well as the Event logs within it. Nice tool!
>
> --
> Regards,
> Ace
>
> Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> so all can benefit.
>
> This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> and confers no rights.
>
> Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> Microsoft Windows MVP - Windows Server - Directory Services
>
> Paramount: What's up with taking Enterprise off the air??
> Infinite Diversities in Infinite Combinations.
> =================================
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 3:18:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

> I have to ask please if I could. What is the OU? I saw this before but was
> unable to find out what the acronym was.

Organizational Unit

An OU is a container within an Active Directory domain.

For a first understanding think of it as the collection of
users and computers in a DEPARTMENT of a company.

OU's can be used for many other things but this idea of
a department gets you close to the concept if you don't
fixate on it and overlook other opportunities to use OUs.
e.g., employee types (consultants, contractors, secretaries,)
locations (but many times we use Sites for this), mirror
former domains (from NT etc.), project teams (semi-permanent
etc.)

Remember these key points on deciding if you need an OU:

1) Delegate authority (over a portion of the domain)

2) Link Group Policy (to a subset of the domain)

Other reasons exist -- like "mirror NT domains" or "hide
objects" (so you don't have to look at them) but they
almost always come down to the two KEY points also.


--
Herb Martin, MCSE, MVP
Accelerated MCSE
http://www.LearnQuick.Com
[phone number on web site]

"Joe" <Joe@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:EA07E1C1-1402-4FF9-A1B9-5A29398201E5@microsoft.com...
> Ace this is awesome!
>
> Thank you I have printed this for my notes.
>
> I have to ask please if I could. What is the OU? I saw this before but was
> unable to find out what the acronym was.
>
> I have never used system state either any direction on this?
> I wouldn't mind learning a little more here so I can refer to this later.
>
> Thank you again
> Joe
>
> "Ace Fekay [MVP]" wrote:
>
> > Joe wrote:
> > > If you don't screw up, you never learn anything worthwhile. :) 
> > >
> > > You are so right!
> > >
> > > Thank you for the help I am going to look for the Profile issue.
> > > Thank you for looking =+)
> > >
> >
> > Not sure if Joe will check back, but as for recovering the DC, Herb's
> > suggestion to restore the system state from a backup on the new rebuild
will
> > bring the DC back up without losing anything, this way the profiles
won't be
> > toasted.
> >
> > Also, as for the 1030 and 1058 errors, I had a similar prob at a
client's
> > site. After messing around and testing it, I've found that on Win2000
PCs,
> > the computer account can be anywhere in the domain for a user's GPO to
work,
> > but found out XP Pro PCs need to have the computer account in the same
OU or
> > under it for the user GPOs to work. Don't know why, but when we moved
the
> > PCs into the user's OU (or in a child of it), the GPOs ran and the
errors
> > disappeared.
> >
> > FYI: I was using GPMC to troubleshoot, specifically RSOP and the
Modeling
> > wizards and reports, as well as the Event logs within it. Nice tool!
> >
> > --
> > Regards,
> > Ace
> >
> > Please direct all replies ONLY to the Microsoft public newsgroups
> > so all can benefit.
> >
> > This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees
> > and confers no rights.
> >
> > Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
> > Microsoft Windows MVP - Windows Server - Directory Services
> >
> > Paramount: What's up with taking Enterprise off the air??
> > Infinite Diversities in Infinite Combinations.
> > =================================
> >
> >
> >
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 2:54:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Joe wrote:
> Ace this is awesome!
>
> Thank you I have printed this for my notes.
>
> I have to ask please if I could. What is the OU? I saw this before
> but was unable to find out what the acronym was.
>
> I have never used system state either any direction on this?
> I wouldn't mind learning a little more here so I can refer to this
> later.
>
> Thank you again
> Joe

My pleasure. Herb summed up an OU.

May I suggest attending an AD class? You can learn much in a 5 day Microsoft
Official Curriculum (MOC) course. Many hands on labs so you can see exactly
how it works!

This course covers (among many other things), Windows 2003 AD, DNS, OUs,
GPOs and disaster recovery:
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/syllabi/2279Afinal.as...

The older Windows 2000 version:
http://www.microsoft.com/learning/syllabi/2154BFinal.as...

Ace
!