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Questions Dealing with Windows Server 2003 DNS

Last response: in Windows 2000/NT
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Anonymous
June 11, 2005 4:54:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Hello,

Could someone help me? I have a number of questions dealing with Windows
Server 2003 DNS.

1 Why can't secondary zones be Active Directory integrated?

2 Does doing a delegation of the parent zone to a child zone just add a
name server record for the authoritative name server of the delegated child
zone to the parent zone?

3 For stub zones, if a name server's IP address changes, would the new IP
of the name server have to be changed in the stub zone too? When I attempted
to do this, I only got errors trying to transfer the new zone information.
It is my understanding that stub zones are advantageous because of the fact
that the stub zone would accept the changes made for zones to which it points.

4 To setup a caching only DNS server, a DNS server without any zones would
have to be set up. Additionally, a DNS server has to 'point' to it. What
are the procedures to have the DNS server 'point' to the caching only DNS
server?

--
Thank you for your help!
JYC

More about : questions dealing windows server 2003 dns

Anonymous
June 11, 2005 12:17:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

In news:1152C49C-590A-4CC2-BCCE-8C381834AC3D@microsoft.com,
Mr. JYC <MrJYC@discussions.microsoft.com> posted this:
> Hello,
>
> Could someone help me? I have a number of questions dealing with
> Windows Server 2003 DNS.
>
> 1 Why can't secondary zones be Active Directory integrated?

Because Active Directory integrated zones are master zones replicated
through Active Directory according to the zone's replication scope.
Secondary zones are read only copies of their masters.

>
> 2 Does doing a delegation of the parent zone to a child zone just
> add a name server record for the authoritative name server of the
> delegated
> child zone to the parent zone?

Though your question is confused, a delegated child name in the parent zone
has the NS record of the DNS server that is authoritative for the child
zone. (And only the NS record)

>
> 3 For stub zones, if a name server's IP address changes, would the
> new IP of the name server have to be changed in the stub zone too? When I
> attempted to do this, I only got errors trying to transfer the new
> zone information.
> It is my understanding that stub zones are advantageous because of
> the fact that the stub zone would accept the changes made for zones
> to which it points.

The stub zone must still have the correct IP of the master on the zone
properties, if that IP changes, you must update the zone properties with the
correct IP.

>
> 4 To setup a caching only DNS server, a DNS server without any zones
> would have to be set up. Additionally, a DNS server has to 'point'
> to it. What are the procedures to have the DNS server 'point' to the
> caching only DNS server?

There are no special procedures, keep in mind, DNS servers listed for AD
Domain members must be able to locate and resolve the AD domain name. If the
caching only DNS cannot locate the AD Domain, it cannot be used by domain
members accept as a forwarder by the AD DNS server.


--?
Best regards,
Kevin D4 Dad Goodknecht Sr. [MVP]
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Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:04:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

On Sat, 11 Jun 2005 00:54:01 -0700, "Mr. JYC"
<MrJYC@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>Could someone help me? I have a number of questions dealing with Windows
>Server 2003 DNS.
>
>1 Why can't secondary zones be Active Directory integrated?

I can do one out of four... (Man, do I need to study up on DNS
again!)

Because in AD there are no primary or secondary zones. That's a
function of AD, where each DC with DNS replicates all records as part
of the AD replication.

Jeff
Anonymous
June 11, 2005 6:15:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.dns (More info?)

Thank you all for your help!

"Mr. JYC" wrote:

> Hello,
>
> Could someone help me? I have a number of questions dealing with Windows
> Server 2003 DNS.
>
> 1 Why can't secondary zones be Active Directory integrated?
>
> 2 Does doing a delegation of the parent zone to a child zone just add a
> name server record for the authoritative name server of the delegated child
> zone to the parent zone?
>
> 3 For stub zones, if a name server's IP address changes, would the new IP
> of the name server have to be changed in the stub zone too? When I attempted
> to do this, I only got errors trying to transfer the new zone information.
> It is my understanding that stub zones are advantageous because of the fact
> that the stub zone would accept the changes made for zones to which it points.
>
> 4 To setup a caching only DNS server, a DNS server without any zones would
> have to be set up. Additionally, a DNS server has to 'point' to it. What
> are the procedures to have the DNS server 'point' to the caching only DNS
> server?
>
> --
> Thank you for your help!
> JYC
!