Xp preinstalled.Do I need to creat disc and if so how. ple..

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

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English Pat
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More about preinstalled creat disc
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    If you mean can you create your own XP cd from the installation on your hard
    drive, the answer is no.

    "English Pat" <EnglishPat@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:44B51649-73D4-454A-9C96-9B47BB88692C@microsoft.com...
    >
    > --
    > English Pat
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    English Pat wrote:
    >
    > --
    > English Pat

    Why didn't you ACTUALLY put a question or more comments in the body of your
    message?

    Ask the people you bought the computer from. An official reseller has to
    provide you a way to restore your system to the condition it was in when you
    bought it.

    HOW they do this is up to them.

    --
    <- Shenan ->
    --
    The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
    yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately responsible
    for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are getting into before
    you jump in with both feet.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    If you happen to have a HP or Compaq computer:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?product=71013&lang=en&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en&docname=bph08097

    Please read the User's Guide that came with your PC
    for further assistance.

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User

    Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "English Pat" wrote:

    Xp preinstalled. Do I need to creat disc and if so how. please

    | --
    | English Pat
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 14:23:01 -0700, English Pat wrote:

    A disk to restore the system?

    There's a lot of different ways that OEMs will provide a means to restore
    their systems to factory state condition. Some do (but not all) provide a
    program on their systems that users will run to create a set of
    restore/recovery CDs. purposes. Check your documentation or with your OEM
    to find out if you have such a program.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore cd's have no
    facility for a repair install, for example. Also, some Home users want
    Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it from.

    "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    news:eoCg$yUuEHA.4040@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 14:23:01 -0700, English Pat wrote:
    >
    > A disk to restore the system?
    >
    > There's a lot of different ways that OEMs will provide a means to restore
    > their systems to factory state condition. Some do (but not all) provide a
    > program on their systems that users will run to create a set of
    > restore/recovery CDs. purposes. Check your documentation or with your OEM
    > to find out if you have such a program.
    >
    > --
    > Sharon F
    > MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23m2482UuEHA.868@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    Cbarnhorst <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> typed:

    > That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore
    > cd's have
    > no facility for a repair install, for example. Also, some Home
    > users
    > want Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it from.


    Although it's a convenience to have it, you don't *need* the CD
    to install it from, since you can download it from
    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/software/ntbackup.msi

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    > news:eoCg$yUuEHA.4040@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >> On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 14:23:01 -0700, English Pat wrote:
    >>
    >> A disk to restore the system?
    >>
    >> There's a lot of different ways that OEMs will provide a means
    >> to
    >> restore their systems to factory state condition. Some do (but
    >> not
    >> all) provide a program on their systems that users will run to
    >> create a set of restore/recovery CDs. purposes. Check your
    >> documentation or with your OEM to find out if you have such a
    >> program.
    >> --
    >> Sharon F
    >> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I am aware of the download, but that was just an example of what lacking an
    XP cd can mean. How would you install the rest of the components? There
    are quite a few not installed by OEM folks.

    "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    news:uq5$DOVuEHA.272@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > In news:%23m2482UuEHA.868@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    > Cbarnhorst <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> typed:
    >
    >> That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore cd's have
    >> no facility for a repair install, for example. Also, some Home users
    >> want Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it from.
    >
    >
    > Although it's a convenience to have it, you don't *need* the CD to install
    > it from, since you can download it from
    > http://www.onecomputerguy.com/software/ntbackup.msi
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    >> "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    >> news:eoCg$yUuEHA.4040@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>> On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 14:23:01 -0700, English Pat wrote:
    >>>
    >>> A disk to restore the system?
    >>>
    >>> There's a lot of different ways that OEMs will provide a means to
    >>> restore their systems to factory state condition. Some do (but not
    >>> all) provide a program on their systems that users will run to
    >>> create a set of restore/recovery CDs. purposes. Check your
    >>> documentation or with your OEM to find out if you have such a
    >>> program.
    >>> --
    >>> Sharon F
    >>> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:u3VwbnVuEHA.2808@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl,
    Cbarnhorst <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> typed:

    >I am aware of the download, but that was just an example of what
    > lacking an XP cd can mean. How would you install the rest of
    > the
    > components? There are quite a few not installed by OEM folks.


    Yes, I agree with you. I'm not in favor of OEM restore CDs and
    would never to choose to buy a system which only came with one. I
    was only pointing out to you (and anyone else reading who didn't
    realize it) that *that* particular disadvantage is not as severe
    as it might otherwise seem.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
    > news:uq5$DOVuEHA.272@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> In news:%23m2482UuEHA.868@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    >> Cbarnhorst <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> typed:
    >>
    >>> That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore
    >>> cd's
    >>> have no facility for a repair install, for example. Also,
    >>> some
    >>> Home users want Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it
    >>> from.
    >>
    >>
    >> Although it's a convenience to have it, you don't *need* the
    >> CD to
    >> install it from, since you can download it from
    >> http://www.onecomputerguy.com/software/ntbackup.msi
    >>
    >> --
    >> Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    >> Please reply to the newsgroup
    >>
    >>
    >>> "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    >>> news:eoCg$yUuEHA.4040@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>>> On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 14:23:01 -0700, English Pat wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> A disk to restore the system?
    >>>>
    >>>> There's a lot of different ways that OEMs will provide a
    >>>> means to
    >>>> restore their systems to factory state condition. Some do
    >>>> (but not
    >>>> all) provide a program on their systems that users will run
    >>>> to
    >>>> create a set of restore/recovery CDs. purposes. Check your
    >>>> documentation or with your OEM to find out if you have such
    >>>> a
    >>>> program.
    >>>> --
    >>>> Sharon F
    >>>> MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 16:14:54 -0600, Cbarnhorst wrote:

    > That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore cd's have no
    > facility for a repair install, for example. Also, some Home users want
    > Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it from.

    That's true and I agree with all you've said. Because of that, I build my
    own desktop systems and purchase a retail copy of the operating system.
    This means warranty service and technical support are provided by multiple
    sources instead of one (Dell, Gateway, etc) but feel that the extra bother
    is worthwhile.

    I realize not everyone is going to build their own computer and will buy a
    pre-built system with Windows already installed. In this case, it is a good
    idea to find out before purchasing exactly what is supplied for recovery
    purposes and what isn't.

    If the provided OEM solution doesn't supply the desired recovery methods
    the choice is to buy a different system with a better or more convenient
    recovery methods.

    Or one could devise their own method for protecting your data and restoring
    your system. For example, one could create an image of the system when it
    is setup exactly the way they want it. Supplement this with periodic images
    (current configuration) and regular data backups and there's not much that
    could come your way that you couldn't quickly recover from.

    In addition to a desktop PC, I regularly use a tablet PC. Imaging plus data
    backups is how I manage that system.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Sharon,

    I just went through a clean install (upgrading drives) only to have FAST
    fail to recognize its own files! Fortunately, I prepped and had data
    folders offloaded to external drives and a complete system backup at hand
    (hooray for Retrospect 6.5). Although it was like combing through a Library
    of Congress index with a lobster fork, I got 100% of the files and settings
    I wanted installed. I also have the old system drive to fall back on since
    there was nothing wrong with it, but a good recovery plan carried out is
    like a good Xanax prescription.

    On another topic, you commented favorably about Diskeeper a few days ago. I
    have been using Diskeeper 9 Home for several days and it is SPEEDY. It now
    includes a performance map tab in addition to the drive map tab. The
    difference is that the performance map shows which fragmented files impact
    performance and which don't, so now you can decide when to defrag based on
    whether or not you are going to get much performance gain. Lot's of red on
    the map means performance is being seriously impacted.

    "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    news:%23DgfrCWuEHA.948@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > On Sat, 23 Oct 2004 16:14:54 -0600, Cbarnhorst wrote:
    >
    >> That does not commonly solve potential needs. Some restore cd's have no
    >> facility for a repair install, for example. Also, some Home users want
    >> Backup.exe and need an XP cd to install it from.
    >
    > That's true and I agree with all you've said. Because of that, I build my
    > own desktop systems and purchase a retail copy of the operating system.
    > This means warranty service and technical support are provided by multiple
    > sources instead of one (Dell, Gateway, etc) but feel that the extra bother
    > is worthwhile.
    >
    > I realize not everyone is going to build their own computer and will buy a
    > pre-built system with Windows already installed. In this case, it is a
    > good
    > idea to find out before purchasing exactly what is supplied for recovery
    > purposes and what isn't.
    >
    > If the provided OEM solution doesn't supply the desired recovery methods
    > the choice is to buy a different system with a better or more convenient
    > recovery methods.
    >
    > Or one could devise their own method for protecting your data and
    > restoring
    > your system. For example, one could create an image of the system when it
    > is setup exactly the way they want it. Supplement this with periodic
    > images
    > (current configuration) and regular data backups and there's not much that
    > could come your way that you couldn't quickly recover from.
    >
    > In addition to a desktop PC, I regularly use a tablet PC. Imaging plus
    > data
    > backups is how I manage that system.
    >
    > --
    > Sharon F
    > MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 00:00:50 -0600, Cbarnhorst wrote:

    > I just went through a clean install (upgrading drives) only to have FAST
    > fail to recognize its own files! Fortunately, I prepped and had data
    > folders offloaded to external drives and a complete system backup at hand
    > (hooray for Retrospect 6.5). Although it was like combing through a Library
    > of Congress index with a lobster fork, I got 100% of the files and settings
    > I wanted installed. I also have the old system drive to fall back on since
    > there was nothing wrong with it, but a good recovery plan carried out is
    > like a good Xanax prescription.
    >
    > On another topic, you commented favorably about Diskeeper a few days ago. I
    > have been using Diskeeper 9 Home for several days and it is SPEEDY. It now
    > includes a performance map tab in addition to the drive map tab. The
    > difference is that the performance map shows which fragmented files impact
    > performance and which don't, so now you can decide when to defrag based on
    > whether or not you are going to get much performance gain. Lot's of red on
    > the map means performance is being seriously impacted.

    Sorry FAST gave you such trouble but am glad to hear that you had other
    backups to fall back on. And agree with your assessment of a good recovery
    plan :)

    Thanks for the info about the new developments in Diskeeper.

    --
    Sharon F
    MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    yw

    "Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
    news:e4CPUzcuEHA.3984@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 00:00:50 -0600, Cbarnhorst wrote:
    >
    >> I just went through a clean install (upgrading drives) only to have FAST
    >> fail to recognize its own files! Fortunately, I prepped and had data
    >> folders offloaded to external drives and a complete system backup at hand
    >> (hooray for Retrospect 6.5). Although it was like combing through a
    >> Library
    >> of Congress index with a lobster fork, I got 100% of the files and
    >> settings
    >> I wanted installed. I also have the old system drive to fall back on
    >> since
    >> there was nothing wrong with it, but a good recovery plan carried out is
    >> like a good Xanax prescription.
    >>
    >> On another topic, you commented favorably about Diskeeper a few days ago.
    >> I
    >> have been using Diskeeper 9 Home for several days and it is SPEEDY. It
    >> now
    >> includes a performance map tab in addition to the drive map tab. The
    >> difference is that the performance map shows which fragmented files
    >> impact
    >> performance and which don't, so now you can decide when to defrag based
    >> on
    >> whether or not you are going to get much performance gain. Lot's of red
    >> on
    >> the map means performance is being seriously impacted.
    >
    > Sorry FAST gave you such trouble but am glad to hear that you had other
    > backups to fall back on. And agree with your assessment of a good recovery
    > plan :)
    >
    > Thanks for the info about the new developments in Diskeeper.
    >
    > --
    > Sharon F
    > MS-MVP ~ Windows XP Shell/User
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