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Fishing one network cable in wall?

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November 4, 2004 6:01:15 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

A friend in a medical office wants a network connection added. Bringing a
cable from the hub to the ceiling above the desk is a piece of cake. Getting
it inside the wall is ... well, I've never done this before.

The ceiling is suspended type with removable tiles. The wall is sheet rock
over metal studs. What is the easiest (only?) way to get a single Cat-5 cable
to its destination in this wall, a few feet off the floor?

Do these types of walls have fire blocking? Or other obstacles that would
require busting through the sheet rock to run the cable?

Thanks,
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

DaveC
me@privacy.net
This is an invalid return address
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Anonymous
November 4, 2004 10:13:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:
>A friend in a medical office wants a network connection added. Bringing a
>cable from the hub to the ceiling above the desk is a piece of cake. Getting
>it inside the wall is ... well, I've never done this before.
>
>The ceiling is suspended type with removable tiles. The wall is sheet rock
>over metal studs. What is the easiest (only?) way to get a single Cat-5 cable
>to its destination in this wall, a few feet off the floor?

In general, you should be able to drop a wire in from the top of the
wall (may have to cut a hole in the sheetrock above the suspended
ceiling), and cut out a box further down the wall. Usually, it's
drywall and stud construction, though the studs may be metal.
Electricians do this all the time, it's not rocket science, though
experience counts for a lot.
Anonymous
November 4, 2004 11:45:38 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

DaveC wrote:

> A friend in a medical office wants a network connection added. Bringing a
> cable from the hub to the ceiling above the desk is a piece of cake.
> Getting it inside the wall is ... well, I've never done this before.
>
> The ceiling is suspended type with removable tiles. The wall is sheet rock
> over metal studs. What is the easiest (only?) way to get a single Cat-5
> cable to its destination in this wall, a few feet off the floor?
>
> Do these types of walls have fire blocking? Or other obstacles that would
> require busting through the sheet rock to run the cable?

If it's standard office type construction, it's just drywall over studs.
Depending on the metal studs used, there may already be holes in it, for
feeding cables through. If not, it's not difficult to punch a hole
through. Then cut a hole in the drywall, below the hole in the top plate
and use a fish, to pull the cable through. If the desk is away from the
wall, you may want to consider a pole for bringing the cable down. There
are many types available. Another method of coming down the wall, is
conduit, that sticks to the wall, over the cable.

Lots of options, depending on the situation.

--

(This space intentionally left blank)
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Anonymous
November 5, 2004 2:57:02 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

On Thu, 4 Nov 2004 15:01:15 -0800, DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:

>A friend in a medical office wants a network connection added. Bringing a
>cable from the hub to the ceiling above the desk is a piece of cake. Getting
>it inside the wall is ... well, I've never done this before.
>
>The ceiling is suspended type with removable tiles. The wall is sheet rock
>over metal studs. What is the easiest (only?) way to get a single Cat-5 cable
>to its destination in this wall, a few feet off the floor?
>
>Do these types of walls have fire blocking? Or other obstacles that would
>require busting through the sheet rock to run the cable?

First you start by drilling a small hole above the ceiling. You need
to find out if the wall is insulated. If it's hollow, fishing is a
piece of cake :-) Fishing line, a sinker, a chain, or any other
gravity fed device will work.

If there happens to be an existing outlet for telephones, you can
remove the cover and trace the route of that cable, it's a simple
matter to hook a cable to the existing one and pull two cables down.

If the wall is insulated, you have a bigger problem. Locate the stud.
You want to drill a hole as close to the stud as possible, because you
want to make your fishtape, green sticks, tent poles or whatever hug
the stud as it goes down the wall. It's usually easier to fish from
top to bottom, because you have a 2x4 inch hole to work with below and
you don't want to make a big exit hole at the top.


HTH

Carl Navarro
Anonymous
November 5, 2004 4:25:16 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

James Knott <james.knott@rogers.com> wrote in message news:<1PWdnfFnFt7fRhfcRVn-ig@rogers.com>...

> If it's standard office type construction, it's just drywall over studs.
> Depending on the metal studs used, there may already be holes in it, for
> feeding cables through. If not, it's not difficult to punch a hole
> through. Then cut a hole in the drywall, below the hole in the top plate
> and use a fish, to pull the cable through. If the desk is away from the
> wall, you may want to consider a pole for bringing the cable down. There
> are many types available. Another method of coming down the wall, is
> conduit, that sticks to the wall, over the cable.
>
> Lots of options, depending on the situation.


Carl's suggestion from way back, of using #12 jack chain attached to
the end of the cable works well in a "typical" situation with no
insulation. Standard 4-pair CAT5e cable fits through the links on the
chain, so you don't need anything else to attach the cable to the
chain. If there is insulation, I use a 8-10' section of 3/4" tape
measure. Get it between the drywall and the insulation and push it
down... it will continue to hug the wall. Use the markings on the
tape to know when you've gone far enough. You may need to hunt for
the tape at the bottom a bit, but it works well.
November 7, 2004 2:16:44 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

All good suggestions.

But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most offices. I
know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also in an office,
it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.

What's your experience?
--
Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn't
ask a question here if I hadn't done that already.

DaveC
me@privacy.net
This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 12:39:31 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

DaveC wrote:

> But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most
> offices. I know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also
> in an office, it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.

I've seen a lot of office drywall put up on steel studs and don't recall
much in the way of things blocking cables. Walls between units might be
another matter.

However, as I mentioned in another note, if you can't go through the wall,
you can always use surface mount conduit.
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 3:57:01 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 23:16:44 -0800, DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:

>All good suggestions.
>
>But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most offices. I
>know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also in an office,
>it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.
>
>What's your experience?


And now you want an answer that requires thought?

No, it is not an issue in most offices. Geeze, what are they going to
block it with? Buy yourself an "old work box" and a tube of fire
caulk if ti makes you feel more comfortable.

Carl
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 3:57:02 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

Carl Navarro wrote:

> On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 23:16:44 -0800, DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:
>
>>All good suggestions.
>>
>>But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most
>>offices. I know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also
>>in an office, it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.
>>
>>What's your experience?
>
>
> And now you want an answer that requires thought?
>
> No, it is not an issue in most offices. Geeze, what are they going to
> block it with? Buy yourself an "old work box" and a tube of fire
> caulk if ti makes you feel more comfortable.

He's talking about firestops, which are usually in the form of a piece of
2x4 crosswise in the stud space.

> Carl

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
Anonymous
November 7, 2004 7:16:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

On Sun, 07 Nov 2004 09:51:01 -0500, "J. Clarke"
<jclarke@nospam.invalid> wrote:

>Carl Navarro wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 23:16:44 -0800, DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:
>>
>>>All good suggestions.
>>>
>>>But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most
>>>offices. I know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also
>>>in an office, it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.
>>>
>>>What's your experience?
>>
>>
>> And now you want an answer that requires thought?
>>
>> No, it is not an issue in most offices. Geeze, what are they going to
>> block it with? Buy yourself an "old work box" and a tube of fire
>> caulk if ti makes you feel more comfortable.
>
>He's talking about firestops, which are usually in the form of a piece of
>2x4 crosswise in the stud space.

And the answer is still the same. NO.

>
>> Carl
Anonymous
November 11, 2004 12:09:34 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet (More info?)

I ran into a situation like that once. The cross piece was a metal stud
and realistically I could not drill through it due to the toughness of
the metal along with the placement of the stud. We just ran the cable
down the wall in a stick-on conduit. Sometimes you have to sacrifice
aesthetics for getting the job done. It was a commercial installation
and all the other drops were in the wall, we just explained to them that
this one was going to be different due to circumstances.

Joe

J. Clarke wrote:
> Carl Navarro wrote:
>
>
>>On Sat, 6 Nov 2004 23:16:44 -0800, DaveC <me@privacy.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>All good suggestions.
>>>
>>>But I still need to know if fire blocking will be an issue in most
>>>offices. I know in homes, blocking between studs is common. If it is also
>>>in an office, it'd be a real pain to get a cable around it, I'd think.
>>>
>>>What's your experience?
>>
>>
>>And now you want an answer that requires thought?
>>
>>No, it is not an issue in most offices. Geeze, what are they going to
>>block it with? Buy yourself an "old work box" and a tube of fire
>>caulk if ti makes you feel more comfortable.
>
>
> He's talking about firestops, which are usually in the form of a piece of
> 2x4 crosswise in the stud space.
>
>
>>Carl
>
>
Anonymous
March 19, 2005 3:20:56 PM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

On 5 Nov 2004 13:25:16 -0800, my02explorer@yahoo.com (Michael Quinlan)
wrote:

>James Knott <james.knott@rogers.com> wrote in message news:<1PWdnfFnFt7fRhfcRVn-ig@rogers.com>...
>
>> If it's standard office type construction, it's just drywall over studs.
>> Depending on the metal studs used, there may already be holes in it, for
>> feeding cables through. If not, it's not difficult to punch a hole
>> through. Then cut a hole in the drywall, below the hole in the top plate
>> and use a fish, to pull the cable through. If the desk is away from the
>> wall, you may want to consider a pole for bringing the cable down. There
>> are many types available. Another method of coming down the wall, is
>> conduit, that sticks to the wall, over the cable.
>>
>> Lots of options, depending on the situation.
>
>
>Carl's suggestion from way back, of using #12 jack chain attached to
>the end of the cable works well in a "typical" situation with no
>insulation. Standard 4-pair CAT5e cable fits through the links on the
>chain, so you don't need anything else to attach the cable to the
>chain. If there is insulation, I use a 8-10' section of 3/4" tape
>measure. Get it between the drywall and the insulation and push it
>down... it will continue to hug the wall. Use the markings on the
>tape to know when you've gone far enough. You may need to hunt for
>the tape at the bottom a bit, but it works well.

Make sure you wrap tape around the "hook" end of the tape measure to
minimize it's chances of getting snagged on something as you pull it
back up.
Anonymous
March 22, 2005 9:40:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,comp.dcom.cabling (More info?)

I'm fairly certain that after 4 and 1/2 months he has already run the
cable.
!