Ink Evaporation?

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I've been happy with the printing quality of my Canon i860 deskjet, but
I'm frustrated by how often I have to replace the color inks even
though I use them so rarely. I use the printer mostly for B&W text;
only occasionally do the documents include color graphics, and I print
only a handful of photos a year. I like having a photo printer
available for those occasions, but I assumed that the elaborate, noisy
unsealing process that precedes each print job meant that the ink
containers were protected from evaporation. However, every couple of
months I'm notified that another color is running low, even when it's
barely been used. Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
evaporation? Thanks.

-- AK
21 answers Last reply
More about evaporation
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Thanks for this information. I wonder if there's a way to find out
    whether my printer (Canon i860) does what you're describing; if so,
    there's certainly no way I can see to force it to print only black.
    It's hard to believe that B&W *text* (not photos) would require this
    much yellow, for example...

    CWatters wrote:
    > "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    > news:1122043658.067036.219990@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > > Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    > > recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    > > evaporation? Thanks.
    >
    > It's not evaporation.
    >
    > When printing B&W text many printers print colour under the black to make
    > the black darker and look better. It's called "under printing".
    >
    > With some printers there is a "Black Only" box you can tick which _might_
    > force the printer to use only the black cartridge however it's not always as
    > simple as that...
    >
    > Some printers have a "Print Grey scale" or "Print in Black and White" (or
    > similar) box that works differently. With this box ticked the printer
    > converts any colour images to greyscale but it STILL uses the colour ink. It
    > uses the colour inks to make shades of grey. This allows the printer to
    > produce better quality "black and white" photos.
    >
    > What you really need is a printer with TWO buttons... One marked "Convert
    > colour images to grey scale" and one marked "Only use the black ink cart".
    >
    > Clear?
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    That thought crossed my mind, but my understanding is that I wouldn't
    be able to print photos occasionally -- or certainly not high-quality
    photos -- even with a color laser. I could use two printers, but I'd
    still have to keep replacing the ink on the inkjet periodically... Do
    you have reason to think that the ink or toner on a color laser
    wouldn't have to replaced as often?
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    > It's hard to believe that B&W *text* (not photos) would require this
    > much yellow, for example..

    The i860 has a newer version of the bj software than my printers, not
    sure if you're on v1.85 or 1.73e, but either one should have a checkbox
    for greyscale printing under the [main] tab when you hit properties.
    Granted it shouldn't need that for text as the i860 has the dedicated
    pigment black which is black enough to be black without adding color.

    Also, what is the size of photos you are printing? The bci-6(color)
    inks are only rated for 280 pages at 5% coverage... which would equal
    14 pages at 100% coverage, or 56 1/4 sized photos 100% coverage.
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122043658.067036.219990@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

    > Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    > recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    > evaporation? Thanks.

    It's not evaporation.

    When printing B&W text many printers print colour under the black to make
    the black darker and look better. It's called "under printing".

    With some printers there is a "Black Only" box you can tick which _might_
    force the printer to use only the black cartridge however it's not always as
    simple as that...

    Some printers have a "Print Grey scale" or "Print in Black and White" (or
    similar) box that works differently. With this box ticked the printer
    converts any colour images to greyscale but it STILL uses the colour ink. It
    uses the colour inks to make shades of grey. This allows the printer to
    produce better quality "black and white" photos.

    What you really need is a printer with TWO buttons... One marked "Convert
    colour images to grey scale" and one marked "Only use the black ink cart".

    Clear?
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    A.K. wrote:

    >I've been happy with the printing quality of my Canon i860 deskjet, but
    >I'm frustrated by how often I have to replace the color inks even
    >though I use them so rarely. I use the printer mostly for B&W text;
    >only occasionally do the documents include color graphics, and I print
    >only a handful of photos a year. I like having a photo printer
    >available for those occasions, but I assumed that the elaborate, noisy
    >unsealing process that precedes each print job meant that the ink
    >containers were protected from evaporation. However, every couple of
    >months I'm notified that another color is running low, even when it's
    >barely been used. Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    >recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    >evaporation? Thanks.
    >
    >-- AK
    >
    >

    YOU MAY BE BEST SERVED BY A LASER.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    A.K. wrote:
    > I've been happy with the printing quality of my Canon i860 deskjet, but
    > I'm frustrated by how often I have to replace the color inks even
    > though I use them so rarely. I use the printer mostly for B&W text;
    > only occasionally do the documents include color graphics, and I print
    > only a handful of photos a year. I like having a photo printer
    > available for those occasions, but I assumed that the elaborate, noisy
    > unsealing process that precedes each print job meant that the ink
    > containers were protected from evaporation. However, every couple of
    > months I'm notified that another color is running low, even when it's
    > barely been used. Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    > recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    > evaporation? Thanks.
    >
    > -- AK


    years and years ago, I had a Canon color inkjet and I had to replace the
    color ink cartridges continuously even though I hardly printed anything.
    I think the spong might have absorbed all those ink! I am now using an
    Okidata color laser printer for most tasks. I, however, do get an Epson
    R200 recently. The ink doesn't "evaporate," but the print head seems to
    more prone to clog. I suspect the bubblejet technology used in Canon -
    heating the ink in the printhead, unclog the head from time to time, but
    in the expense of bigger blobs and types of ink it can use.
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The other factor about ink consumption is the automatic cleaning cycles the
    printer runs through based on usage and when it is activated. A small amount
    of each ink is used when this occurs, so even if you don't print in color
    there will still be color ink consumed by the cleaning cycles. On the i860
    or iP4000, if you are printing in plain paper mode, only the BCI-3ebk is
    used for text printing, but if you have specified a different paper type,
    then the BCI-6BK is used.
    --
    Ron

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122050701.419686.186290@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > Thanks for this information. I wonder if there's a way to find out
    > whether my printer (Canon i860) does what you're describing; if so,
    > there's certainly no way I can see to force it to print only black.
    > It's hard to believe that B&W *text* (not photos) would require this
    > much yellow, for example...
    >
    > CWatters wrote:
    >> "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    >> news:1122043658.067036.219990@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >> > Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    >> > recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    >> > evaporation? Thanks.
    >>
    >> It's not evaporation.
    >>
    >> When printing B&W text many printers print colour under the black to make
    >> the black darker and look better. It's called "under printing".
    >>
    >> With some printers there is a "Black Only" box you can tick which _might_
    >> force the printer to use only the black cartridge however it's not always
    >> as
    >> simple as that...
    >>
    >> Some printers have a "Print Grey scale" or "Print in Black and White" (or
    >> similar) box that works differently. With this box ticked the printer
    >> converts any colour images to greyscale but it STILL uses the colour ink.
    >> It
    >> uses the colour inks to make shades of grey. This allows the printer to
    >> produce better quality "black and white" photos.
    >>
    >> What you really need is a printer with TWO buttons... One marked
    >> "Convert
    >> colour images to grey scale" and one marked "Only use the black ink
    >> cart".
    >>
    >> Clear?
    >
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    The problem is not evaporation. The noisy process you allude to is not
    an unsealing process as much as a cleaning process, which pumps some ink
    through the head and out into a waste ink area on the printer. The
    printer does this to all colors and therefore they all lose some ink
    with each cleaning. Over time, they empty of ink, even through none of
    it, or very little of it may end up on paper.

    Art

    A.K. wrote:

    > I've been happy with the printing quality of my Canon i860 deskjet, but
    > I'm frustrated by how often I have to replace the color inks even
    > though I use them so rarely. I use the printer mostly for B&W text;
    > only occasionally do the documents include color graphics, and I print
    > only a handful of photos a year. I like having a photo printer
    > available for those occasions, but I assumed that the elaborate, noisy
    > unsealing process that precedes each print job meant that the ink
    > containers were protected from evaporation. However, every couple of
    > months I'm notified that another color is running low, even when it's
    > barely been used. Any suggestions with this printer -- or can you
    > recommend another printer that does a better job protecting against
    > evaporation? Thanks.
    >
    > -- AK
    >
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Makes sense. The question, then, is whether any other inkjet printers
    (made by Canon or other manufacturers) do a reasonably good job but
    without this ink-draining process. Presumably such a printer would be
    more economical for someone who rarely prints in color.

    -- AK
  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122134475.116440.150780@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Makes sense. The question, then, is whether any other inkjet printers
    > (made by Canon or other manufacturers) do a reasonably good job but
    > without this ink-draining process. Presumably such a printer would be
    > more economical for someone who rarely prints in color.

    Most printers with integrated ink supply and printheads do minimal servicing.
    Printers with separate ink and printheads may have to do more servicing to keep
    air out of the system. HP has recently announced a new system that
    recirculates the ink used in servicing, minimizing the loss due to servicing.
    See: http://www.photo-i.co.uk/News/July05/HP%208250.htm

    Regards,
    Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    A better solution would be to either refill your cartridges or use
    inexpensive third party cartridges. The cost will be so low that way you
    won't even notice it.
    --
    Ron

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122134475.116440.150780@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Makes sense. The question, then, is whether any other inkjet printers
    > (made by Canon or other manufacturers) do a reasonably good job but
    > without this ink-draining process. Presumably such a printer would be
    > more economical for someone who rarely prints in color.
    >
    > -- AK
    >
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Ron Cohen wrote:

    >A better solution would be to either refill your cartridges
    >

    This is a terrible solution. It increases your chance for a printhead
    clog. Canon Ink was designed for a Canon printer by Canon. I would
    think they know best. It is like putting an aftermarket automatic
    transmission in your car. I am sure it would work for a while.

    > or use
    >inexpensive third party cartridges.
    >

    This is, in many cases a worse solution since there are no aftermarket
    carts that have branded ink inside and I have never seen a vendor
    willing to disclose who makes and formulates the ink inside.

    > The cost will be so low that way you
    >won't even notice it.
    >
    >

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122134475.116440.150780@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

    >> Makes sense. The question, then, is whether any other inkjet printers
    >> (made by Canon or other manufacturers) do a reasonably good job but
    >> without this ink-draining process. Presumably such a printer would be
    >> more economical for someone who rarely prints in color.
    >>
    >> -- AK
    >>
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:

    >
    > This is, in many cases a worse solution since there are no aftermarket
    > carts that have branded ink inside and I have never seen a vendor
    > willing to disclose who makes and formulates the ink inside.

    Oh really! I don't think so. You have no idea what you're talking about
    and everyone here knows that.
    To prove otherwise why don't you post the exact chemical formulation of
    the oem inks you use, ok! I think we would all be interested in that
    little trade secret.
    Go ahead and call Canon as I'm sure they are waiting by the phone for
    your call.
    Well...
    Frank
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:

    >
    >
    > Caught you with your pants down and your balls bouncing on the
    > pavement. Tell me where they sell aftermarket carts where they disclose
    > who the mfg/formulater is. I am sure that many ng readers would be
    > interested in buying them. You are now revealing yourself to be a dumb
    > supid idiotic moronic imbecile.

    You still don't get it do you moron. Nobody will disclose trade secret
    ink formulations the very thing you keep harping about.
    You're actually dumber than I thought you were.
    Frank
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Frank wrote:

    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Caught you with your pants down and your balls bouncing on the
    >> pavement. Tell me where they sell aftermarket carts where they
    >> disclose who the mfg/formulater is. I am sure that many ng readers
    >> would be interested in buying them. You are now revealing yourself
    >> to be a dumb supid idiotic moronic imbecile.
    >
    >
    > You still don't get it do you moron. Nobody will disclose trade secret
    > ink formulations the very thing you keep harping about.
    > You're actually dumber than I thought you were.
    > Frank


    Hey stupid,

    it is not a trade secret to disclose to a customer what he is buying. I
    just do not know how anybody, except for maybe Burtie Furtie Jerkie
    could be a stubbornly stupid and Frankie Wankie Crankie.
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    measekite wrote:
    >
    >
    > Frank wrote:
    >
    >> measekite wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Caught you with your pants down and your balls bouncing on the
    >>> pavement. Tell me where they sell aftermarket carts where they
    >>> disclose who the mfg/formulater is. I am sure that many ng readers
    >>> would be interested in buying them. You are now revealing yourself
    >>> to be a dumb supid idiotic moronic imbecile.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> You still don't get it do you moron. Nobody will disclose trade secret
    >> ink formulations the very thing you keep harping about.
    >> You're actually dumber than I thought you were.
    >> Frank
    >
    >
    >
    > Hey stupid,
    >
    > it is not a trade secret to disclose to a customer what he is buying. I
    > just do not know how anybody, except for maybe Burtie Furtie Jerkie
    > could be a stubbornly stupid and Frankie Wankie Crankie.

    Ok, go ahead and psot the formulation of any ink available on the market
    today, oem or otherwise.
    Well, we're waiting.
    Frank
  17. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Frank wrote:

    > measekite wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Frank wrote:
    >>
    >>> measekite wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Caught you with your pants down and your balls bouncing on the
    >>>> pavement. Tell me where they sell aftermarket carts where they
    >>>> disclose who the mfg/formulater is. I am sure that many ng readers
    >>>> would be interested in buying them. You are now revealing yourself
    >>>> to be a dumb supid idiotic moronic imbecile.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> You still don't get it do you moron. Nobody will disclose trade
    >>> secret ink formulations the very thing you keep harping about.
    >>> You're actually dumber than I thought you were.
    >>> Frank
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Hey stupid,
    >>
    >> it is not a trade secret to disclose to a customer what he is
    >> buying. I just do not know how anybody, except for maybe Burtie
    >> Furtie Jerkie could be a stubbornly stupid and Frankie Wankie Crankie.
    >
    >
    > Ok, go ahead and psot the formulation of any ink available on the
    > market today, oem or otherwise.
    > Well, we're waiting.
    > Frank

    Da lowest IQ on the NG
  18. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    A.K. wrote:

    > Makes sense. The question, then, is whether any other inkjet printers
    > (made by Canon or other manufacturers) do a reasonably good job but
    > without this ink-draining process. Presumably such a printer would be
    > more economical for someone who rarely prints in color.
    >
    > -- AK
    >

    I have seen a friend's Canon printer with color cartridges full of ink all
    year long and not consume a single drop. He left the pull tape on the top of
    his color cartridges untouched. Normally before installing a color cartridge
    (such as a BCI-6) you need to pull the tape so that the vent at the top is
    opened up. By leaving the tape as is the vent remains closed. As a result
    the ink inside is never consumed.

    Some may ask if this would cause damage to the printhead as no color ink in the
    printhead and the heaters may burn out. I have no answer to this question. When
    I pulled the tapes from those cartridges the colors printed fine in no time.
    No clog no damage no problem whatsoever. Even the cleaning cycles could not get
    any ink out of them. Guess what? The friend did not know the tape has to be
    pulled off. He thought his printer is bad and can not print colors despite the
    color cartridges are full of ink. He proceeded to use the printer to print
    black text only for over a year. When the BCI-3ebk ink ran out he had someone
    to replace it for him. The tape on the BCI-3ebk was pulled off by that person.

    Well, this may be the answer for you.
  19. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Thanks for this. Unfortunately, I want to be able to print in color
    occasionally, so unless it's possible to open and reclose the
    cartridges, I'm not sure this would work.
  20. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    You could replace the tape over the vent if you really want to do this. Why
    not just get some inexpensive cartridges and put them in? The cost would be
    minimal and you'd still be able to print in color any time you wanted to.
    --
    Ron

    "A.K." <comm2@alfiekohn.org> wrote in message
    news:1122390859.724577.320940@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > Thanks for this. Unfortunately, I want to be able to print in color
    > occasionally, so unless it's possible to open and reclose the
    > cartridges, I'm not sure this would work.
    >
  21. It is not evaporation and it may not be under printing as many printers have an option to only print with the black ink cartridge. However, even when that option is selected, most printers will still use a small amount of yellow ink to print the tracking codes.

    http://w2.eff.org/Privacy/printers/docucolor/
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/18/AR2005101801663.html
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