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Rate of Repair?

Last response: in Work & Education
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September 10, 2010 5:35:01 PM

Hello,
How fast do employers require a technician to fix a particular problem. I know every situation varies. A general ballpark estimate will suffice, i.e. 30 min to 1 hour? or I should say what the maximum amount of time an employer would give before starting to get upset. I'm trying to help improve myself

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September 10, 2010 6:06:40 PM

There is no specific time frame that will answer your question.

An employer who has personal knowledge of the kinds of "problems" you are dealing with, or who has experience supervising techs doing substantially the same work, will have some going-in concept of the time required. If you step outside the norm, (s)he will ask you about it and judge the credibility of your answer.

I know you are trying to improve yourself, but frankly even asking this question in this way indicates you need more experience in these types of interactions.
September 11, 2010 12:37:34 AM

Twoboxer said:
There is no specific time frame that will answer your question.

An employer who has personal knowledge of the kinds of "problems" you are dealing with, or who has experience supervising techs doing substantially the same work, will have some going-in concept of the time required. If you step outside the norm, (s)he will ask you about it and judge the credibility of your answer.

I know you are trying to improve yourself, but frankly even asking this question in this way indicates you need more experience in these types of interactions.

What type interactions do you mean?
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October 22, 2010 7:51:40 AM

Technical interactions with users. You can go into a situation that looks serious, and it's a 5 minute fix. Vs you could be looking at another issue that seems simple, and ends up being an all day job. There is not going to be a set time frame. Where I used to work at, we used a ticketing system that showed where all of your tickets where physically at. The best thing I found is try to get to where you have groups, in other words, unless you've got something really pressing, try to get to where you can do the most good in the shortest time possible. Work for efficiency.

If you can be efficient, and always striving for better efficiency, you should do well.
October 22, 2010 11:33:54 PM

Also boss-subordinate interactions. Don't ask how your boss will judge you.

Instead, think about *you* would judge *your* employee's performance?

You know, as if your life and income depended on that employee telling you the truth, acting responsibly, and doing a job worth the money you give him.
November 14, 2010 7:21:16 AM

Twoboxer said:
Also boss-subordinate interactions. Don't ask how your boss will judge you.

Instead, think about *you* would judge *your* employee's performance?

You know, as if your life and income depended on that employee telling you the truth, acting responsibly, and doing a job worth the money you give him.


that's right.
November 14, 2010 3:41:24 PM

Tech Support, unfortunately, in many outfits is more about getting the user off the phone than solving his problem. If a coworker in MoBo support takes 3 calls telling the users "Upgrade your video drivers" and hanging up, while you actually solve the problem, the evaluation is he took 3 calls to your 1. Not every outfit acts accordingly and hopefully the place you're working takes more interest in the long term and focuses on customer satisfaction rather than the short view and the weekly tally of the bottom line.

It's an ugly reality but a hard fact of the corporate world today.....however, if consumers would value "service" rather than the absolute lowest price over all other considerations perhaps this would change.
November 15, 2010 2:02:35 AM

ohiou_grad_06 said:
The best thing I found is try to get to where you have groups, in other words, unless you've got something really pressing, try to get to where you can do the most good in the shortest time possible.

That can lead to cherry picking. And too much of that and your coworkers will lynch you.
November 15, 2010 3:40:42 PM

I guess for me too, where I worked, I was responsible for the majority of hardware repairs, and with only 3 techs that covered 8 sites, you can imagine how interesting things got. That's why I was taught to do it that way, for the sake of efficiency.
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